Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Nursing | Pharmacy | AIDS | Preventive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

More Americans Get Effective HIV Treatment, Study Says

Last Updated: September 05, 2012.

 

And they appear to be less infectious

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
And they appear to be less infectious.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of HIV-infected people in the United States receiving highly active retroviral therapy has increased since 2000, according to a new study.

The researchers also found that people with HIV appear to be less infectious and have healthier immune systems at death.

Researchers looked at national data on 45,000 people receiving clinical care for infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Between 2000 and 2008, the proportion of HIV-infected people prescribed highly active retroviral therapy increased nine percentage points to 83 percent.

During that time, there was an increase in viral load suppression among HIV patients. Suppression of viral load reduces the likelihood of transmitting HIV to others. Among patients taking highly active retroviral therapy, the proportion with suppressed viral load increased from 54 percent to 81 percent between 2000 and 2008.

The researchers also found an increase in median CD4 immune cell count among patients who died from HIV. A higher CD4 count suggests a healthier immune system.

The study, published in the Sept. 4 issue of the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, was led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, in Baltimore.

The findings are "good news for the HIV epidemic in the U.S., but there is room for improvement," lead author Keri Althoff, an assistant professor in the Bloomberg School's department of epidemiology, said in a school news release. "We need to continue to focus on linking HIV-infected adults into care and effective treatment, not only for the individual's health, but to reduce the likelihood of transmission to others."

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has more about HIV/AIDS.

SOURCE: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, news release, Sept. 3, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Poor Sleep Among Preschoolers May Be Tied to Special Ed Needs Later Next: Treated Vaginal Ring Prevents HIV in Monkeys

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.