Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Gynecology | Obstetrics | Reproductive Medicine | AIDS | News

Back to Health News

Treated Vaginal Ring Prevents HIV in Monkeys

Last Updated: September 05, 2012.

 

Experts hope the technique might one day curb transmission in humans

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Experts hope the technique might one day curb transmission in humans.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A vaginal ring that releases an anti-HIV drug protected laboratory monkeys against infection, a new study says.

The study shows that delivery of a microbicide from a vaginal ring can be effective, and suggests potential for the success of such rings in women, according to the researchers at the Population Council, an international nonprofit group.

However, research conducted with animals doesn't always produce the same results in humans.

Microbicides are substances that can be applied inside the vagina or rectum to protect against HIV, which is the AIDS-causing virus, and other sexually transmitted infections.

In this study, council scientists placed vaginal rings treated with either a microbicide or a placebo in macaque monkeys. The animals were then exposed to a single dose of SHIV, a virus that combines genes from HIV and SIV, the monkey version of HIV.

Two of 17 macaques with the microbicide vaginal rings became infected, compared with 11 of 16 macaques with the placebo vaginal rings. That means that the microbicide vaginal rings were 83 percent effective in protecting against the virus.

"This proof-of-concept study confirms that the investment in vaginal rings as a delivery system for HIV prevention is paying off," Naomi Rutenberg, vice president and director of the Population Council's HIV and AIDS Program, said in a council news release. "Our findings show that rings can deliver an anti-HIV drug to prevent infection."

An effective vaginal ring with microbicides would solve a common problem with microbicides in gel form, which is the risk that users will forget to use them or apply them improperly.

The Population Council wants to develop a vaginal ring that women can insert and leave in place for up to three months. Current models, used to prevent pregnancy, are treated with the hormones estrogen and progestin and placed in the vagina once a month.

More information

The U.S. Office on Women's Health has more about women and HIV/AIDS.

SOURCE: Population Council, news release, Sept. 5, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: More Americans Get Effective HIV Treatment, Study Says Next: Scientists Inch Closer to Genetic Blueprint of Diseases

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.