Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Pediatrics | Sports Medicine | Nutrition | News

Back to Health News

Exercise Does Boost Teens’ Health, Study Finds

Last Updated: September 10, 2012.

 

Benefits include reductions in waist size, blood pressure, body mass

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Benefits include reductions in waist size, blood pressure, body mass.

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Vigorous physical activity helps reduce adolescents' risk of heart and metabolic problems, according to a new study.

Canadian researchers looked at more than 600 youths with an average age of about 12 years to assess how levels of physical activity affected cardiometabolic risk factors such as body-mass index (a measurement of body fat based on height and weight), waist circumference, systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) and heart and lung (cardiorespiratory) fitness.

Twenty-six percent of the children were overweight or obese at the study's start.

The researchers found that with vigorous exercise, BMI, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure decreased, and that cardiorespiratory fitness and maximal oxygen consumption increased.

Doing more than seven minutes of vigorous exercise a day was associated with reduced chances of being overweight and of having elevated systolic blood pressure.

Light or moderate exercise did not lead to any significant changes in cardiometabolic risk factors.

The study was published online Sept. 10 in the journal Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

The findings show that vigorous physical activity is superior to light and moderate exercise for reducing cardiometabolic risk factors in youth, concluded Jacqueline Hay, of the Manitoba Institute of Child Health in Canada, and colleagues.

The results strongly support the inclusion of vigorous exercise targets within current physical-activity guidelines for youth, they added.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about physical activity and young people.

SOURCE: Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, news release, Sept. 10, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Curbing Suicide Now a National Priority, U.S. Says Next: U.S. Panel Rejects Ovarian Cancer Screens for Low-Risk Women

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.