Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Neurology | News

Back to Health News

Stroke Drug Might Be a Memory-Booster

Last Updated: February 02, 2009.

 

Fasudil improved the recall of middle-aged rats, scientists say

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Fasudil improved the recall of middle-aged rats, scientists say.

MONDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Fasudil, a drug used for a decade to safely treat people with vascular problems in the brain, appears to improve some learning and memory abilities in middle-aged rats, a new study says.

The findings, published in the February issue of Behavioral Neuroscience, give researchers hope of finding a way to combat the normal decrease in cognitive function experienced by humans as they age.

Rats injected with hydroxyfasudil, the active ingredient in Fasudil, performed better on a maze that tested their spatial learning and working memory than those given a placebo. The rodents given higher doses of the drug did better than those given a lower dose.

"Fasudil shows great promise as a cognitive enhancer during aging," study co-author Heather Bimonte-Nelson, of Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium and Arizona State University, said in a news release issued by the journal's publisher. "The effects in our aging animal model were robust, showing enhancements in both learning and two measures of memory. The possibility that these findings may translate to benefits to human brain health and function is very exciting."

Fasudil is often prescribed to help stroke victims recover by treating vascular problems in the brain. The drug dilates blood vessels to help blood flow.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about healthy aging.

SOURCE: American Psychological Association, news release, Feb. 2, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Health Tip: Caring for a Deep Cut Next: Inflammation May Play Role in Sleep Duration

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Commenting is not available in this channel entry.
advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.