or underweight had worst outlook” />

Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Oncology | Nutrition | News

Back to Health News

Body Fat May Affect Death Risk Among Breast Cancer Patients

Last Updated: October 29, 2012.

 

Study found that those who were obese or underweight had worst outlook

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Study found that those who were obese or underweight had worst outlook.

MONDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Having a very high or low body-mass index or high waist-to-hip ratio raises the risk of death among breast cancer patients, but this association varies some by race and ethnicity, a new study suggests.

Body-mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio are both measures of body fat, and both affect overall and breast-cancer-specific risk of death, according to the researchers.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 12,000 white, black, Hispanic and Asian-American patients in the California Breast Cancer Survivorship Consortium.

"Overall, we found that patients with breast cancer who were underweight, extremely obese or had high levels of abdominal body fat had the worst survival," Marilyn Kwan, a research scientist in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research, said in an American Association for Cancer Research news release.

Compared to normal-weight women, underweight women had a 47 percent increased overall risk of death and extremely obese women had a 43 percent increased risk. Compared to those with the lowest waist-to-hip ratio, women with the highest waist-to-hip ratio (highest level of abdominal fat) had a 30 percent increased overall risk of death and a 36 percent increased risk for breast-cancer-related death.

Further investigation revealed that the association between weight and death risk differed by race and ethnicity. Although this study found an association between the two, it did not prove a cause-and-effect link.

"Among non-Latina white women, being underweight and morbidly obese at breast cancer diagnosis was associated with worse survival, yet this relationship was not found in the other racial/ethnic groups," Kwan said. "Instead, African-American women and Asian-American women with larger waist-to-hip ratios had poorer survival, an observation not seen in non-Latina white women and Latina women."

The findings, scheduled to be presented Monday at a meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, in San Diego, support the common recommendation to maintain a healthy weight throughout life, Kwan said. She noted, however, that the long-term impact of weight on survival after breast cancer might not be the same in all patients.

Research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about breast cancer.

SOURCE: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, Oct. 28, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Mothers' Weight-Loss Surgery Linked to Kids' Heart Health Next: 'Hercules' Star Kevin Sorbo Knows Stroke Strikes the Young

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.