Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Gynecology | Reproductive Medicine | News

Back to Health News

Women, Young Adults Misinterpret Chest Pain: Study

Last Updated: November 06, 2012.

 

Females also less likely to be told they might have heart disease

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Females also less likely to be told they might have heart disease.

TUESDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Women with chest pain are more likely than men to wait more than a day to seek care, a new study finds.

And, not surprisingly, young adults are less likely than older adults to think that their chest pain may be related to heart problems, the researchers said.

Both women and men sought care because their symptoms persisted, but women were less likely than men to seek care because they suspected heart disease, study author Judith Lichtman of the Yale University School of Public Health and colleagues pointed out in a news release from the American Heart Association.

For the study, the researchers interviewed nearly 3,000 people, aged 18 to 55, who were hospitalized for heart attack in 104 U.S. hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Ninety percent of the men and 87 percent of the women had experienced chest pain, pressure, tightness or discomfort with their heart attack.

The investigators also found that:

  • Symptoms led nearly one-third of women and 20 percent of men to visit their doctor before their heart attack.
  • Women were less likely to recall discussing heart disease with their doctors, or to be told by health-care providers that their symptoms might be related to their heart.
  • Nearly 60 percent of the men and women did not think their symptoms were heart-related. Many women said they believed indigestion, stress or anxiety was the cause, while men cited indigestion or muscle pain.

The study was scheduled for presentation Monday at the American Heart Association's annual scientific meeting in Los Angeles.

The data and conclusions of research presented at meetings are typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about heart attack.

SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, Nov. 5, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Health Tip: Protect Your Child From Abduction Next: Brain Anatomy May Play Role in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     
net

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.