Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Infections | AIDS | Oncology | Research | News

Back to Health News

Stem Cell Technology May Help Rejuvenate Immune Cells

Last Updated: January 03, 2013.

 

Manipulation of aging T-cells might help them defend against diseases such as HIV and cancer, researchers say

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Manipulation of aging T-cells might help them defend against diseases such as HIV and cancer, researchers say.

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cell technology may one day give new life to tired immune cells so they can battle diseases such as HIV and cancer more effectively, two new studies suggest.

Scientists in Japan used old immune T-cells and regenerated them into T-cells that multiplied in greater numbers, had longer lifespans and showed a greater ability to target diseased cells. The finding could lead to more effective immune therapies, the researchers said.

Both reports were published in the Jan. 4 issue of the journal Cell Stem Cell.

"The system we established provides 'young and active' T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy against viral infection or cancers," study senior author Dr. Hiromitsu Nakauchi, of the University of Tokyo, said in a journal news release.

In one study, researchers transformed mature T-cells from an HIV-infected patient into pluripotent stem cells, a type of stem cell that has the ability to differentiate into nearly any type of cell in the body. In a second study, researchers used T-cells from a patient with melanoma, a particularly deadly type of skin cancer. In both cases, the researchers helped the pluripotent stem cells differentiate back into T-cells.

The good news was that these "rejuvenated" immune cells were an improvement on the original T-cells, the researchers noted.

The HIV patient's T-cells had an unlimited lifespan and long caps on the ends of their chromosomes, which protected them from aging.

Meanwhile, the T-cells from the patient with melanoma were able to recognize the protein commonly expressed in this type of cancer.

"The next step we are going to do is examine whether these regenerated T-cells can selectively kill tumor cells but not other healthy tissues. If such cells are developed, these cells might be directly applied to patients," study senior author Dr. Hiroshi Kawamoto, of the RIKEN Research Center for Allergy and Immunology in Yokohama City, Japan, said in the news release. "This could be realized in the not-so-distant future."

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has more on the immune system.

SOURCE: Cell Press, news release, Jan. 3, 2013

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Married Women More Likely to Have Positive Pregnancies: Study Next: People Underestimate How Much They Might Change in the Future: Study

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.