Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Pediatrics | Nutrition | News

Back to Health News

Cholesterol Screening Shouldn’t Rely on Kids’ Weight

Last Updated: August 07, 2009.

 

Guidelines focusing on heavier children may miss the target, study finds

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Guidelines focusing on heavier children may miss the target, study finds.

FRIDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. cholesterol testing guidelines for children may have to be revised, say researchers who found that measuring body fat isn't an effective indicator of high cholesterol in kids.

In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued revised cholesterol screening guidelines that recommended a cholesterol check for children at increased risk of heart disease, mainly those who are overweight or obese.

Since then, a University of Michigan team have examined the relationship between body mass index and total and low-density ("bad") lipoprotein cholesterol. They found that screening all overweight or obese children would identify only about 50 percent of children with abnormal cholesterol levels. It would also result in unnecessary testing for up to 30 percent of children.

The results show that "using body mass index to find kids with high cholesterol does not work well. There were many overweight and obese kids who had normal cholesterol, and there were a fair number of healthy-weight kids who had high cholesterol," study co-leader Dr. Joyce Lee, a member of the Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit in the U-M Division of General Pediatrics, and assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Disease at U-M Medical School, said in a news release from the university.

The study was published in the Aug. 3 issue of the journal Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

"Our results indicate that the AAP guidelines for cholesterol screening in kids may need to be revised. Otherwise, we may be missing high cholesterol in some kids and unnecessarily testing others," Lee added.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children and cholesterol.

SOURCE: University of Michigan Health System, news release, Aug. 3, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Signs of Depression Noted in Second Graders Next: If Baby Is Breech, Technology Might Help

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.