Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Neurology | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Radiology | Medical Students | News

Back to Health News

Anxiety Disorder Patients Process Emotions Differently

Last Updated: February 18, 2010.

 

MRI scans show abnormal brain activity, researchers say

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
MRI scans show abnormal brain activity, researchers say.

THURSDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For those with the common mental illness known as generalized anxiety disorder, a new study has found that the brain processes emotions in abnormal ways.

The study authors say the research could provide new insight into better treatments for people suffering from debilitating anxiety.

"Patients experience anxiety and worry and respond excessively to emotionally negative stimuli, but it's never been clear really why," Dr. Amit Etkin, acting assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University and first author of the study, said in a news release.

In the study, researchers gave MRI brain scans to 17 people with generalized anxiety disorder and 24 healthy people. The researchers wanted to understand what happened in participants' brains as they felt various emotions.

The study authors found that the brains of the participants reacted differently in some situations. The findings suggest that the prefrontal cortex is abnormal in people with generalized anxiety disorder, and the researchers think that knowledge could lead to better diagnosis and treatment.

Senior study author Dr. Alan Schatzberg, chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University, said in the news release that the findings, published in the February online issue of American Journal of Psychiatry, could lead to greater understanding of the biology of psychopathology and how people respond to psychotherapy.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has information on anxiety disorders.

SOURCE: Stanford University, news release, Feb. 10, 2010

Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Health Tip: Looking for Early Signs of Dyslexia Next: Tired Teens Prone to Car Crashes

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.