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Category: Endocrinology | Monthly Briefing

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April 2010 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

Last Updated: May 03, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for April 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Newer Diabetes Drugs May Confer Substantial Costs

FRIDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- Newer medications for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, such as exenatide and sitagliptin, may be associated with substantial costs, suggesting that the health benefits they confer need to be considerable in order for them to provide economic value to health care systems and patients, according to research published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

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Many Obese Diabetes Patients Have Abnormal Stress Tests

FRIDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- More than 20 percent of overweight or obese individuals with type 2 diabetes may experience abnormal graded exercise test (GXT) results, with higher age being the most consistent predictor of abnormal results, according to research published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

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Hepatitis C May Have Causal Role in Insulin Resistance

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Suppression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with improved insulin resistance (IR), suggesting that the virus may play a causal role in IR, according to research published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Dieting May Raise Cortisol Levels, Leading to Weight Gain

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Monitoring and cutting calories may result in psychological and biological stresses in women, along with an increase in cortisol production and related weight gain, which should be considered before clinicians recommend dieting, according to a study published online April 5 in Psychosomatic Medicine.

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Benefit Seen in Recurrent Moderate Hypoglycemia

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Recurrent moderate hypoglycemia appears to precondition the brain to limit the amount of neuronal damage and subsequent cognitive dysfunction associated with severe hypoglycemia, according to the results of an animal study published in the April issue of Diabetes.

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ECE: Testosterone, ED Tied to Higher Cardiac Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Low testosterone levels in men with erectile dysfunction (ED) are associated with an increased risk of dying of cardiovascular disease, according to a study presented at the European Congress of Endocrinology, held from April 24 to 28 in Prague, Czech Republic. A study by the same researchers also presented at the meeting found that impaired penile blood flow is linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in obese men with ED more than in leaner men with the condition.

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Excess Mortality in ACCORD Study Not Due to Low A1C

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- A post hoc analysis of mortality data from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study has determined that rapid glucose lowering and maintenance of lower A1C levels through intensive control -- as opposed to a standard strategy -- was not the cause of increased death rates in that arm of the study, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

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Risk Factors for Physician Misconduct Identified

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who are male, are from lower socioeconomic groups or had academic difficulties in medical school may be at increased risk of professional misconduct, according to a study published online April 27 in BMJ.

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Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use May Up Heart Failure Risk

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term users of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) may have more severe cardiac dysfunction than previously suspected, possibly putting them at higher risk of heart failure, according to research published online April 27 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Vitamin B Therapy May Be Unsafe in Diabetic Nephropathy

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetic nephropathy who take high doses of vitamin B may experience a greater decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) than those on placebo, as well as an increase in vascular events, according to research published in the April 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Changes Medical Device Advisory Committee Process

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Because of the increasing number of medical device advisory panel meetings in recent years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is changing the way expert panels review and discuss information during public hearings on devices that are being reviewed for premarket approval.

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Nearly Half of Adults Have at Least One Cardiac Risk Factor

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all U.S. adults have either high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or some combination of the three, according to a new report on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999 to 2006, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Interruptions Increase Medication Errors by Nurses

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses who are interrupted in the process of preparing and administering medications are more likely to make an error, with error severity increasing with the number of interruptions, according to a study in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Women With PCOS Exhibit Different Insulin Reactions

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can develop impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and combined glucose intolerance (CGI) despite having hyperinsulinemia, and their insulin response patterns vary though they have similar insulin resistance, according to research published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

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Financial Ties Negatively Affect Perceptions of Research Quality

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Disclosure of financial ties to industry influences patients', physicians', and research participants' beliefs about the quality of research evidence, according to a review published in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Poor Health Behaviors Combo Has Major Effect on Mortality

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- The combined ill effects of several negative health behaviors -- ranging from suboptimal fruit and vegetable intake to smoking -- result in major increases in mortality, according to a study in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Most Doctors Not Knowledgeable About Herbals

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians are not knowledgeable about herbal medicines and believe the general public is poorly informed as well, according to the results of a survey published in the April issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

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In Diabetes Patients, Modifiable Factors Up Risk of Cesarean

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- Nulliparous women with type 1 diabetes mellitus have a high rate of cesarean delivery, and their potentially modifiable risk factors for cesarean delivery include pre-pregnancy body weight, gestational weight gain, and accuracy of the prediction of fetal macrosomia, according to a study published in the May issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Liraglutide Found Superior to Sitagliptin for Glycemic Control

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- In type 2 diabetes patients who have inadequate glycemic control on metformin therapy, liraglutide injections are well tolerated and are more effective than oral sitagliptin in reducing HbA1C, according to a study in the April 24 issue of The Lancet.

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FDA Adds Boxed Warning to Propylthiouracil Label

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has added a boxed warning to the label of propylthiouracil due to the risk of serious liver injury -- which in some cases may be fatal -- in adult and pediatric patients.

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Nanoparticles May Have Role Against Autoimmune Diseases

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Nanoparticles coated with peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC-NP) can successfully reverse diabetes in a mouse model of the disease, with research suggesting that this approach could be used against other autoimmune diseases, according to a study published online April 8 in Immunity.

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Non-β-Cells in Pancreas Can Become Insulin Producers

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- When β-cells, which make and release insulin in the pancreas, are destroyed, non-insulin-producing α-cells can convert into β-cells, according to a mouse study published April 4 in Nature.

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Disease Predictor for Relatives of Diabetes Patients Identified

THURSDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- In relatives of type 1 diabetes patients, who are at high risk for developing the disease, impaired β-cell glucose sensitivity is a strong predictor of disease progression, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes.

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Pancreaze Approved for Pancreatic Enzyme Deficiency

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Pancreaze delayed release capsules have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the estimated 200,000 or more people in the United States whose bodies do not produce enough pancreatic enzymes, the agency said in a news release.

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High Glycemic Load Linked to CHD Risk in Women

MONDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- In women in an Italian cohort, high dietary glycemic load and carbohydrate intake from high glycemic index foods are associated with a higher overall risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but this association is not seen in men, according to research published in the April 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Surreptitious Administration of Insulin Seen in Case Studies

MONDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Unexplained hypoglycemia in children can be perplexing, and surreptitious administration of insulin -- whether by children themselves or their caregivers -- may need to be considered as a cause, according to three case studies published online April 12 in two different articles in Pediatrics.

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Heavier Patients Not Found to Receive Inferior Care

TUESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Obese and overweight patients don't appear to receive inferior care compared with normal-weight patients across a variety of performance measures, although being overweight or obese is associated with a slightly higher rate of recommended care on some measures, according to research published in the April 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Exercise Mitigates Effect of Obesity Gene in Adolescents

TUESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with the minor A allele of the fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO) rs9939609 polymorphism are at high risk of obesity, but that risk can be overcome by an hour or more of daily exercise, according to a study in the April issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Recommendations Issued for Individualized Diabetes Care

TUESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Expanded analysis of existing data sources and the development of new research studies that include a greater focus on identifying type 2 diabetes subtypes and their responses to different therapies are important to help individualize therapies for the disease, according to a review published in the April issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Exercise in Late Pregnancy May Lower Offspring Birth Weight

MONDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- Regular aerobic exercise in the second half of pregnancy may lead to a reduction in offspring birth weight and reduced cord concentrations of growth-related peptides without an effect on maternal insulin sensitivity, according to a study published online March 24 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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BPA Exposure Not Linked to Greater Size in Adult Mice

FRIDAY, April 2 (HealthDay News) -- Mice exposed to bisphenol-A (BPA) during gestation and lactation may be heavier or longer than unexposed mice when they are very young but not in adulthood, even when raised on a high-fat diet, according to research published online March 29 in Endocrinology.

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Study Examines How High-Fat Diet Affects Injected Insulin

FRIDAY, April 2 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin resistance that is induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) prevents injected insulin from appearing in the interstitial space, leading to reduced binding to skeletal muscle cells and glucose uptake, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes.

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Hyperthyroidism Linked to Stroke Risk in Young Adults

FRIDAY, April 2 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with hyperthyroidism are at higher risk of suffering ischemic stroke than those in their age group without the condition, according to a study published online April 1 in Stroke.

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Spironolactone Shows Benefit in Diet With High Fat, Fructose

THURSDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Benefits linked to spironolactone in mice suggest a role for mineralocorticoid receptor inhibition in addressing diet-induced metabolic syndrome and fatty liver, according to research published online March 8 in Endocrinology.

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