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Category: Nursing | Monthly Briefing

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April 2010 Briefing - Nursing

Last Updated: May 03, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for April 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

CDC: U.S. Infant Mortality Rate Declined 3 Percent in 2006

FRIDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- Between 2005 and 2006, the overall U.S. infant mortality rate declined by 3 percent. However, the rate varied widely by race and ethnicity, and very preterm infants accounted for more than half of all infant deaths, according to a new report -- Infant Mortality Statistics From the 2006 Period Linked Birth Infant Death Data Set -- released April 30 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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2009/2010 Flu Vaccination Rates Up Sharply for Children

FRIDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- National influenza vaccination coverage for the 2009/2010 flu season increased substantially for children, and moderately for younger adults without high-risk conditions, according to a report in the April 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Many Obstetricians Support Short Interpregnancy Intervals

FRIDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the fact that interpregnancy intervals of less than six months are associated with poorer outcomes, a majority of obstetricians support interpregnancy intervals of this length for parents who are bereaved by perinatal death, according to a study in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Visits When Doctor Is Seated Seem Longer to Patients

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients perceive brief bedside visits from a physician to be longer if the physician is seated rather than standing, according to research from the University of Kansas.

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Surveillance Feasible for Small Testicular Masses

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- In men with incidental testicular masses less than 1 cm in size, ultrasound surveillance may be a safe alternative to immediate surgical removal, according to a study published in the April issue of The Journal of Urology.

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IV Narcotics Safe in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Use of intravenous narcotics (IVN) is common in different scenarios for patients with different types of acute coronary syndromes, and it does not appear to have an adverse effect on outcomes, according to research published in the April 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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In VBAC, Epidural Doses Linked to Uterine Rupture Risk

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Frequent epidural anesthesia doses needed by women who attempt vaginal delivery after cesarean delivery (VBAC) may indicate an increased risk for uterine rupture, according to research published in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Dieting May Raise Cortisol Levels, Leading to Weight Gain

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Monitoring and cutting calories may result in psychological and biological stresses in women, along with an increase in cortisol production and related weight gain, which should be considered before clinicians recommend dieting, according to a study published online April 5 in Psychosomatic Medicine.

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BMI Often Fails to ID Obesity in Women of Reproductive-Age

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Using cutoff values for body mass index (BMI) that are recommended by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) may fail to identify obesity in reproductive-aged women in certain ethnic or racial populations who meet the criteria for obesity by percent body fat, according to research published in the May issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Statin Use May Lower Risk of Prostate Cancer Recurrence

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- In men treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer, statin use is associated with significant improvements in clinical outcomes, including a higher likelihood of relapse-free survival, according to research published online April 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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FDA Warns of Faulty Parts in 14 Defibrillator Models

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning about external defibrillators manufactured by Cardiac Science Corp. that may malfunction when being used to rescue people in cardiac arrest.

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Risk Factors for Physician Misconduct Identified

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who are male, are from lower socioeconomic groups or had academic difficulties in medical school may be at increased risk of professional misconduct, according to a study published online April 27 in BMJ.

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ALA Report Finds Good, Bad News on Air Pollution

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Despite reductions in particle and ozone pollution in recent years, unhealthy air remains a threat to about 58 percent of Americans, according to the American Lung Association's State of the Air 2010 report.

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Head-Mounted Device May Be Helpful for Anesthesiologists

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a head-mounted display (HMD) that shows patients' vital signs in anesthesiologists' field of vision during a procedure is associated with more time spent monitoring the patient and surgical field, according to research published in the April issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Rates, Costs of Imaging in Medicare Patients Have Risen

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- The use of diagnostic imaging in Medicare patients with cancer has increased, as have imaging costs, which are outpacing the rate of the increase in total costs among Medicare recipients who have cancer, according to research published in the April 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Changes Medical Device Advisory Committee Process

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Because of the increasing number of medical device advisory panel meetings in recent years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is changing the way expert panels review and discuss information during public hearings on devices that are being reviewed for premarket approval.

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Some Tracheostomy Tubes Made by Covidien Recalled

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Covidien and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have initiated a voluntary recall of certain lots of cuffed Shiley tracheostomy tubes and custom/specialty tracheostomy tubes because pilot balloon inflation assembly leaks result in the cuffs not holding air.

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Device Found as Effective as Heparin for Clot Prevention

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a mobile compression device for the prevention of thromboembolic disease after total hip arthroplasty is likely just as effective as low-molecular-weight heparin treatment but safer, according to a study in the March issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Nearly Half of Adults Have at Least One Cardiac Risk Factor

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all U.S. adults have either high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or some combination of the three, according to a new report on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999 to 2006, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Interruptions Increase Medication Errors by Nurses

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses who are interrupted in the process of preparing and administering medications are more likely to make an error, with error severity increasing with the number of interruptions, according to a study in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Therapeutic Swings May Cause Eye Injury in Autistic Children

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians from two different medical centers recently identified therapeutic home swings, used for vestibular stimulation in patients with autism-spectrum disorders, as the common culprit in recurrent corneal metallic foreign bodies in two of their patients, according to an article published in the Journal of AAPOS, the official periodical of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus.

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Survival in Extreme Preterm Infants Unchanged Since 1993

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1993, more infants born at less than 24 weeks' gestation have lived more hours or even days thanks to active resuscitation, but overall survival has not improved, according to a report published online April 22 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal & Neonatal Edition.

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Financial Ties Negatively Affect Perceptions of Research Quality

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Disclosure of financial ties to industry influences patients', physicians', and research participants' beliefs about the quality of research evidence, according to a review published in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Depression Linked to Increased Chocolate Consumption

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- People who are depressed really do appear to eat more chocolate than those who are not depressed, though it is unclear whether there is a causal link, according to a study in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Poor Health Behaviors Combo Has Major Effect on Mortality

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- The combined ill effects of several negative health behaviors -- ranging from suboptimal fruit and vegetable intake to smoking -- result in major increases in mortality, according to a study in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Recall Issued for LIFEPAK 15 Monitor/Defibrillator

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted health care professionals of a Class I recall of Physio-Control Inc.'s LIFEPAK 15 Monitor/Defibrillator, distributed between March 26 and December 15, 2009, as the device may have issues with powering on and off.

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Selecting High Risk Patients for Cardio Screening Cost-Effective

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Using routine data for cardiovascular risk stratification before inviting high risk individuals to be screened may be just as effective, and less costly, for preventing cardiovascular disease than the U.K. government's recommended national strategy to screen everyone aged 40 to 74 for cardiovascular risk, according to research published April 25 in BMJ.

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FDA Addresses External Infusion Pump Safety Issues

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced a new initiative to address safety issues related to external infusion pumps, which are commonly used in hospitals, other clinical settings, and patient's homes.

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Report Addresses Intimate Partner Violence

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- It is important for pediatricians to be familiar with the signs of intimate partner violence (IPV), to identify abused caregivers, and to be able to evaluate and treat children from homes where family violence may occur, according to a clinical report published online April 26 in Pediatrics.

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Daily Chest Radiography in ICU May Be Unnecessary

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Daily routine chest radiography in adults in intensive care units (ICUs) could likely be eliminated without a subsequent increase in adverse outcomes, according to research published in the May issue of Radiology.

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Panel Warns of Risks Posed by Female Genital Cutting

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Immigrants from areas where female genital cutting (FGC) in infants, children and adolescents is common may request physicians in the United States to perform such procedures, but the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) opposes all types of FGC that pose physical or psychological risk, and counsels its members not to perform such procedures, according to a policy statement published online April 26 in Pediatrics.

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Most Doctors Not Knowledgeable About Herbals

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians are not knowledgeable about herbal medicines and believe the general public is poorly informed as well, according to the results of a survey published in the April issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

DTB Survey on Herbal Medicines

Policy Statement Addresses DNAR Requests in Schools

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians have a critical role to play in working with school nurses and officials to ensure the do-not-attempt-resuscitation (DNAR) requests of the families of children and adolescents with complex chronic conditions are honored, according to a policy statement published online April 26 in Pediatrics.

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Study Assesses Knowledge of Health Care Costs, Utilization

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who have more knowledge about their copayments for visits to the doctor and the emergency department appear to behave in a more cost-efficient manner, with fewer emergency department visits and more office visits, according to research published in the April issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

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Soldiers Treated for Neck Pain Unlikely to Return to Duty

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- The treatment of medically evacuated soldiers with neck pain at a military treatment facility is associated with low return-to-unit rates, according to a study in the April 1 issue of Spine.

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Younger Workers Often at High Risk for Occupational Injury

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- Younger workers (15 to 24 years of age) are often employed in jobs that place them at high risk for injury, and employers should ensure that they can safely perform their jobs by identifying and mitigating safety hazards, according to a report published in the April 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Liraglutide Found Superior to Sitagliptin for Glycemic Control

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- In type 2 diabetes patients who have inadequate glycemic control on metformin therapy, liraglutide injections are well tolerated and are more effective than oral sitagliptin in reducing HbA1C, according to a study in the April 24 issue of The Lancet.

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First-Trimester Vaginal Bleeding Tied to Complications

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- First-trimester vaginal bleeding during a woman's first pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of complications later in the pregnancy and with a recurrence of bleeding and other complications in a later pregnancy, according to a study in the May issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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New P. Falciparum Malaria Drug as Effective as Standard

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- Pyronaridine-artesunate, a new anti-malarial drug that can be given once a day, is as effective as the current standard Plasmodium falciparum malaria treatment, artemether-lumefantrine, which requires twice-daily dosing, according to a study in the April 24 issue of The Lancet.

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Urologist Presence Linked to Less Urologic Cancer Mortality

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of a urologist in a county is linked to lower mortality for prostate, bladder and kidney cancer, though increasing urologist density beyond two urologists per 100,000 people does not result in further improvements, according to research published online April 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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BRCA Risk Often Missed in Ovarian Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although there has been improvement over time, interpretation of risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer patients, and subsequent referral for genetic counseling, remains poor, with half of substantial-risk patients being missed in 2007, according to research published in the May issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Scientific Panel Upholds Lyme Disease Treatment Guidelines

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- After more than a year of hearings and deliberations, a special review panel has unanimously concluded that no changes are warranted to the Infectious Diseases Society of America's (IDSA) 2006 Lyme disease treatment guidelines, which have been the subject of an antitrust investigation by Connecticut's attorney general, Richard Blumenthal.

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Acupuncture Shows Benefit After Cancer Neck Dissection

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture could play a role in treating problems such as pain, dysfunction and xerostomia following neck dissection for cancer, according to research published online April 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Lactose-Intolerant Can Tolerate Cup of Milk Daily

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Most people with presumed lactose intolerance or malabsorption can tolerate about a cup of milk daily, according to research published online April 19 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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T. Tonsurans Rate High in Black Children in Kansas City

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Of Kansas City schoolchildren tested for Trichophyton tonsurans infection, 6.6 percent exhibited positive cultures, and black children had the highest prevalence of infection, according to a study published online April 19 in Pediatrics.

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Delaying CABG Surgery Does Not Benefit NSTEMI Patients

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although most non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients undergo late coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery after arriving at a hospital, they do not have improved outcomes compared with patients who undergo early CABG, despite having higher-risk clinical characteristics, according to research published in the April issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Women at Risk of Periviable Birth, Providers ID Priorities

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients and health care providers agree that information provision and emotional support are fundamentally important for women at risk of periviable delivery, but there are pitfalls that can impair the provider-patient relationship if not avoided, according to a study in the May issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Serious Infection in Children With Fever Often Missed

WEDNESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department physicians tend to underestimate the likelihood of serious bacterial infection in young children presenting with fever, pointing to the need for improved diagnostic protocols, according to research published online April 20 in BMJ.

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Taped Consult Boosts Patient Knowledge, Sense of Control

WEDNESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Audiotaping a cardiac surgery patient's pre-surgical consultation, and providing the patient with the tape to review, substantially increases his or her knowledge and sense of control, while reducing anxiety and depression, according to a study in the April issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Non-Teaching Hospitals Found Superior for Colon Resection

WEDNESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- For colon resections across the spectrum of disease -- including benign disease -- the volume-outcome relationship favors non-teaching hospitals over teaching hospitals, according to research published in the April issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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E-visits for Acne Patient Follow-Up Found Effective

WEDNESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Follow-up care for acne patients delivered via online visits, or "e-visits," results in an equivalent outcome clinically compared with conventional office visits, according to a study in the April issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Children's Hospitals Often Do Little to Offset High Occupancy

WEDNESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Among children's hospitals, there is a low rate of acute response to high occupancy, and the magnitude of response is small in those that do respond, according to research published online April 19 in Pediatrics.

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IOM: FDA Should Regulate Salt Content in Food

WEDNESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- New federal standards are needed to regulate the amount of salt that food manufacturers, restaurants, and food service companies can add to their products, according to an Institute of Medicine report -- Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States -- published April 21 by the National Academies Press.

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Delaying Clopidogrel After Stent Placement May Be Deadly

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have had a drug-eluting stent (DES) inserted delay filling a prescription for clopidogrel after discharge from the hospital, and, as a result, they face nearly double the risk of heart attack or death, according to research published online April 20 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Early Antivirals Decrease H1N1 Mortality in Pregnant Women

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with influenza A(H1N1) have a high risk of mortality, although early antiviral treatment is associated with fewer intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and lower mortality, according to research published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cochlear Implants Help Young Children More Than Expected

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children who undergo cochlear implantation before age 5 may have greater spoken-language learning improvements than predicted, according to research published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Added Sugars Linked to Measures of Dyslipidemia

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Greater consumption of added sugars in foods is associated with cardiovascular risk factors including lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and higher triglyceride levels, according to research published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low-Dose CT Linked to High False-Positive Rates

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- The risks for false-positive results on lung cancer screening tests are substantial after two yearly examinations, especially with low-dose computed tomography (CT), according to a study in the April 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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ASCO, CAP Release Guideline for Breast Cancer Testing

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- A guideline from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) has been issued with the intention of improving the accuracy of immunohistochemical testing for estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer. The guideline was published online April 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine.

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Long-Term Effects of Sucrose in Infants Unclear

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Little is known about the potential long-term developmental effects of early dietary exposure to sugar, and physicians should be conservative in their use of sucrose to ameliorate pain in preterm and critically ill infants, according to research published online April 19 in Pediatrics.

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Shared Appointments Improve Census, Profit in Dermatology

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- In dermatology practices, shared medical appointments (SMAs) can increase patient access and productivity and be financially profitable, according to research published in the April issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Review Finds Surprisingly High Death Rate for Kids' Choking

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital admissions for airway foreign body and esophageal foreign body airway obstruction in pediatric patients occur infrequently, but are associated with a surprisingly high mortality rate, according to a review published in the April issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Secondhand Smoke Linked to Chronic Rhinosinusitis

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is common in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and many cases of CRS may be directly attributable to the SHS exposure, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Many Physicians Ignore Interim Guidelines for Hib Vaccine

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Most primary care physicians who administer Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine are aware of interim recommendations for vaccine shortages -- including deferral of the vaccine booster for healthy 12- to 15-month-olds -- but many do not adhere to the recommendations, according to research published online April 19 in Pediatrics.

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Study Examines Tobacco Ingestion in Young Children

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 14,000 cases of tobacco-product ingestion in children were reported in 2006 to 2008, many of which involved smokeless tobacco products, according to a study published online April 19 in Pediatrics. An analysis in the same issue determined that the National Poison Data System is an important tool for monitoring inhalant abuse in children.

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Many Child Care Directors Unnecessarily Exclude Children

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Even though Wisconsin endorses American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and American Public Health Association (APHA) national guidelines on exclusion of children from child care centers, the state has high rates of unnecessary exclusions by child care directors, according to research published online April 19 in Pediatrics.

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Evidence for Nursing Handoff Effectiveness Lacking

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Although the negative consequences of inadequate nursing handoffs are well understood, very little research has been done to identify best practices, according to a systematic review published in the April issue of the American Journal of Nursing.

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Books Read to Baby Helpful Teaching Tools for New Mothers

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Books that new mothers read to infants may be effective in providing anticipatory guidance to the women, according to research published online April 12 in Pediatrics.

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Surgery Helps Improve Sex Life in Lumbar Disc Herniation

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with lumbar disc herniation may experience impairment to their sex lives, and while surgery can help improve sexual desire and activities, women may take longer than men to resume sexual activities, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of Spine.

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Quality Improvement Process Benefits ICU Patients

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute respiratory failure who are in intensive care, implementation of a quality improvement process involving a multidisciplinary team is associated with significant improvements in intensive care unit delirium, physical rehabilitation and functional mobility, and a decreased length of stay, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

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Chagas Disease Linked to Increased Risk of Stroke

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Chagas disease -- which affects 18 million people worldwide -- is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although cardioembolism is the main cause, cryptogenic stroke and small vessel stroke also often occur in indeterminate Chagas disease and in patients with mild chronic heart disease related to Chagas disease, according to a review published in the May issue of The Lancet Neurology.

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Respiratory Syncytial Virus Exacts Global Toll in Children

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) may be responsible for acute lower-respiratory infections (ALRIs) that kill nearly 200,000 children younger than 5 worldwide each year, according to a review published online April 16 in The Lancet.

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Many Delay Seeking Care Following TIA, Minor Stroke

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial portion of individuals with a minor stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) don't seek medical care within 24 hours, and most do not correctly recognize the cause of their symptoms, according to research published online April 15 in Stroke.

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Weekend Admission Affects Mortality in Acute Kidney Injury

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Being admitted to the hospital on a Saturday or Sunday with acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality compared to being admitted on a weekday, according to a study published online April 15 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Cardiovascular Benefits Seen With Folate, B6 in Japanese

THURSDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among middle-aged and older Japanese, high dietary intake of folate and vitamin B6 is linked to lower risk of mortality from stroke, coronary heart disease, and heart failure, according to research published in the April 15 issue of Stroke.

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Many Youths With Respiratory Conditions Use Inhalants

THURSDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- More than 4 percent of adolescents ages 12 to 17 have used an inhalant in the past year, including many with a respiratory condition such as pneumonia, bronchitis, asthma or sinusitis, according to The National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

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Many Physicians Using Inappropriate FOBT Methods

THURSDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians who use the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) for colorectal cancer screening administer the test in-office rather than using home-based tests, which are recommended by national guidelines, according to research published online April 10 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Mouth Breathing May Lead to Medical, Other Problems

THURSDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Health care professionals may be unaware of the physical, medical and social problems associated with mouth breathing, but it is important for the entire health care community -- including dentists -- to screen for and diagnose the condition to prevent these problems, according to an article in the January/February issue of General Dentistry.

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Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Progression to Active TB

THURSDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Low vitamin D levels are associated with progression to active tuberculosis in healthy household contacts of tuberculosis patients, according to a study published online April 14 in Emerging Infectious Diseases. Another study in the same journal found a high prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among drug users, female sex workers, and homeless individuals in Tijuana, Mexico.

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CDC: Adults With Depression More Likely to Smoke

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with depression are more likely to smoke and be heavier smokers, and are less likely to quit smoking, compared to those without depression, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Deficiencies in Colorectal Cancer Screening Addressed

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal cancer screening rates fall short of desirable levels, according to two early-release articles published online April 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. One article urges targeted initiatives to improve screening rates and reduce disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups. The other article confirms that important problems exist regarding the underuse, overuse and misuse of screening, and also urges system- and policy-level interventions.

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Bariatric Surgery Linked to Lower Risk of Pregnancy Complications

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women who undergo bariatric surgery before having a baby have a lower risk of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy than obese women who have a baby before undergoing bariatric surgery, according to a retrospective cohort study published online April 13 in BMJ.

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Mothers Influence Daughters' Uptake of HPV Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Even when young women are old enough to get vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) without parental consent, mother-daughter communication about sex and daughters' perception of their mothers' approval of the vaccination are important predictors of vaccination, according to research published online April 12 in Pediatrics.

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Seven Metered-Dose Inhalers to Be Phased Out

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Seven metered-dose inhalers that contain ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons will be gradually removed from the U.S. marketplace, according to an April 13 announcement by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Early Defibrillation Boosts Survival in Cardiac Arrest

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- People who have out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and are resuscitated with an automatic external defibrillator (AED) prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) personnel have nearly twice the survival rate of those who don't get AED resuscitation, according to a study in the April 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Malpractice Fears May Lead to Unneeded Heart Tests

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Among cardiologists, variability in the propensity to test and treat partly contributes to regional variation in the utilization of general health and cardiology services, but the factor most closely associated with this propensity is fear of malpractice suits, according to a study published online April 13 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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H1N1 Seroconversion Rates Varied in Singapore Cohorts

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- After the June to September 2009 wave of 2009 influenza A(H1N1) in Singapore, serologically determined infection rates varied widely by cohorts and age groups, suggesting that the context-specific risks of infection need to be considered, and interventions need to be tailored to the at-risk population, according to a study published in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Financial Worries, Lack of Insurance Tied to MI Care Delays

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who don't have insurance, or who have insurance but have financial concerns related to accessing care, are more likely to delay seeking emergency care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to research published in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Women Unaware of Increased Fracture Risk

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of women with risk factors for osteoporotic-associated fractures are unaware of their increased risk, according to a study published online April 1 in Osteoporosis International.

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Report Addresses Lung Cancer Rate in African-Americans

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- African-Americans are more likely to develop lung cancer -- and to die from it -- than any other population group in the United States, and a new report by the American Lung Association provides information to help stakeholders understand and address the issue.

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New Clinical Algorithms Guide Gastrointestinal Diagnosis

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- "Diagnostic Algorithms for Common Gastrointestinal Symptoms," a new comprehensive set of clinical algorithms to help primary care physicians and gastroenterologists accurately and cost-effectively diagnose frequent gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of functional GI disorders that are often difficult to diagnose, has been published in the April issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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Advanced Age Affects Mortality Risk After Device Implantation

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- In-hospital mortality is significantly higher for elderly patients who receive implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) compared with younger patients, according to a study in the April 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Cotrimoxazole Tied to Bleeding in Older Patients on Warfarin

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- In older patients treated with warfarin, the use of cotrimoxazole is associated with a higher risk of upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage than other common antibiotics, according to research published in the April 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Migraine Care Often Subpar for Uninsured, Medicaid Patients

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Uninsured people and those on Medicaid who suffer from migraines are more likely to receive substandard therapy than privately insured patients, at least partly because they receive more care in the emergency department instead of a physician's office, according to research published in the April 13 issue of Neurology.

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