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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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April 2010 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: May 03, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for April 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

CBT Rapid Responders More Likely Maintain Gains in IBS

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Many irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients who undergo cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) experience a positive response within four weeks, and these rapid responders are more likely to maintain their treatment gains than those who do not have a rapid response, according to a study in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Dieting May Raise Cortisol Levels, Leading to Weight Gain

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Monitoring and cutting calories may result in psychological and biological stresses in women, along with an increase in cortisol production and related weight gain, which should be considered before clinicians recommend dieting, according to a study published online April 5 in Psychosomatic Medicine.

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Risk Factors for Physician Misconduct Identified

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who are male, are from lower socioeconomic groups or had academic difficulties in medical school may be at increased risk of professional misconduct, according to a study published online April 27 in BMJ.

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Studies Find Genetic Factors in Smoking-Related Behaviors

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic variants appear to play a role in several aspects of smoking behavior, according to three articles published online April 25 in Nature Genetics.

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FDA Changes Medical Device Advisory Committee Process

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Because of the increasing number of medical device advisory panel meetings in recent years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is changing the way expert panels review and discuss information during public hearings on devices that are being reviewed for premarket approval.

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Therapeutic Swings May Cause Eye Injury in Autistic Children

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians from two different medical centers recently identified therapeutic home swings, used for vestibular stimulation in patients with autism-spectrum disorders, as the common culprit in recurrent corneal metallic foreign bodies in two of their patients, according to an article published in the Journal of AAPOS, the official periodical of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus.

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Financial Ties Negatively Affect Perceptions of Research Quality

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Disclosure of financial ties to industry influences patients', physicians', and research participants' beliefs about the quality of research evidence, according to a review published in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Depression Linked to Increased Chocolate Consumption

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- People who are depressed really do appear to eat more chocolate than those who are not depressed, though it is unclear whether there is a causal link, according to a study in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Report Addresses Intimate Partner Violence

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- It is important for pediatricians to be familiar with the signs of intimate partner violence (IPV), to identify abused caregivers, and to be able to evaluate and treat children from homes where family violence may occur, according to a clinical report published online April 26 in Pediatrics.

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Most Doctors Not Knowledgeable About Herbals

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians are not knowledgeable about herbal medicines and believe the general public is poorly informed as well, according to the results of a survey published in the April issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

DTB Survey on Herbal Medicines

Stress Hormones May Promote Ovarian Cancer Metastasis

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with ovarian cancer, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) modulation by stress hormones -- especially norepinephrine and epinephrine -- may contribute to tumor progression, according to research published online April 12 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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In Utero Methadone Exposure Linked to Vision Problems

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born to women who misused drugs and were prescribed methadone during pregnancy are at risk for a range of vision problems, and those with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) severe enough to receive pharmaceutical treatment may especially be at risk for developing nystagmus, according to a report published online April 21 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Taped Consult Boosts Patient Knowledge, Sense of Control

WEDNESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Audiotaping a cardiac surgery patient's pre-surgical consultation, and providing the patient with the tape to review, substantially increases his or her knowledge and sense of control, while reducing anxiety and depression, according to a study in the April issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Video Games Before Bed Affect Teens' Sleep Only Slightly

WEDNESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Playing stimulating video games prior to bedtime has only a slight effect on the sleep of older male teens, according to a study in the April 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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Indoor Tanning Addiction Observed in College Students

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Many college students meet the criteria for addiction to indoor tanning, which is also associated with an increased likelihood of anxiety and substance use, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Val Allele Linked to Protective Effect on Cognitive Function

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, the Val variant of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is associated with a protective effect on cognitive function, according to research published in the April 20 issue of Neurology.

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Surgery Helps Improve Sex Life in Lumbar Disc Herniation

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with lumbar disc herniation may experience impairment to their sex lives, and while surgery can help improve sexual desire and activities, women may take longer than men to resume sexual activities, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of Spine.

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In Men With ED, Statins Linked to Hypogonadism

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Observations of men with erectile dysfunction suggest that statin therapy may lead to overt primary hypogonadism, which should be considered when evaluating testosterone levels in these patients, according to research published in the April issue of the Journal of Sex Medicine.

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CYP2D6 Inhibitors Not Linked to Breast Cancer Recurrence

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a strong biologic rationale, there may be no association between concomitant usage of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) inhibitors such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and breast cancer recurrence in patients with early-stage disease who are treated with adjuvant tamoxifen, though there is an association between poor tamoxifen adherence and increased risk of breast cancer events, according to a study published online April 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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CDC: Adults With Depression More Likely to Smoke

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with depression are more likely to smoke and be heavier smokers, and are less likely to quit smoking, compared to those without depression, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Mothers Influence Daughters' Uptake of HPV Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Even when young women are old enough to get vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) without parental consent, mother-daughter communication about sex and daughters' perception of their mothers' approval of the vaccination are important predictors of vaccination, according to research published online April 12 in Pediatrics.

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Some Anticonvulsants Linked to Higher Suicide Risk

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with topiramate use, the use of gabapentin, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and tiagabine may be associated with a higher risk of suicidal acts or violent death, according to research published in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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In Alzheimer's, Reduced Lean Mass Tied to Brain Atrophy

MONDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Lean mass is reduced in people with early Alzheimer's disease compared with individuals without dementia, and this reduction is associated with brain atrophy and cognitive performance, according to a study in the April issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Diet May Help Prevent Development of Alzheimer's

MONDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- A diet high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), vitamin E and folate, and low in saturated fatty acids (SFAs), may help prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published online April 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Spanking 3-Year-Olds Ups Risk of Increased Aggression Later

MONDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- When mothers employ even mild corporal punishment, such as spanking, to discipline their 3-year-olds, those children are more likely to display more aggressive behavior by the age of 5, even when confounding factors are accounted for, according to research published online April 12 in Pediatrics.

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Suicide Risk Seen With Mental, Physical Conditions in Youths

MONDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Youths with chronic physical conditions have a slightly higher risk of self-harm, suicidal thinking and attempted suicide than healthy peers, and a suicide risk assessment training module using standardized patients is more effective in teaching pediatric interns than lecture alone, according to research published online April 12 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Barnes
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Couples Who Lose a Pregnancy More Likely to Break Up

FRIDAY, April 9 (HealthDay News) -- Married or cohabitating couples are at a higher risk for breaking up after experiencing a stillbirth or miscarriage than those who experience a live birth, according to research published online April 5 in Pediatrics.

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Child's Post-Anesthesia Crying Unaffected by Parent Presence

WEDNESDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Young children coming out of anesthesia postoperatively in a post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) may cry whether or not their parents are present, though parental presence is associated with decreased negative behavior change two weeks later, according to a study in the April issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Increased Depression Among Medical Interns Assessed

WEDNESDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- There is a marked increase in depressive symptoms among medical interns, and there are specific genetic, individual and internship factors associated with this increase, according to research published online April 5 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Combination of Risk Alleles in NTRK2 Tied to Suicide Attempt

WEDNESDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of several independent risk alleles within the neurotrophic receptor-encoding gene NTRK2 may be associated with suicide attempts among depressed patients, according to research published in the April issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Environment Affects Quality of Life in Adolescent Scoliosis

WEDNESDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Living environment may influence assessment results of the quality of life after surgery in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients, according to a study in the March 15 issue of Spine.

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Median Duration of Bipolar I Mood Episodes Is 13 Weeks

WEDNESDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- The median duration for bipolar I episodes is 13 weeks, and the probability of recovery is affected by the severity of onset and other factors, according to a study in the April issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Social Network Affects Individuals' Drinking Behavior

TUESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in alcohol consumption behavior within a person's social network affect that individual's own alcohol consumption behavior, which supports the role of group-level interventions in addressing problem drinking, according to research published in the April 6 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Elderly on Antipsychotics at Higher Risk for Pneumonia

TUESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients taking antipsychotic medication are at a dose-dependent increased risk of developing community-acquired pneumonia, according to a study published in the April 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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'Brazilian Diet Pills' May Create Dangerous Dependence

MONDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- Amphetamine-based weight loss pills from Brazil, known as "Brazilian diet pills," are potentially addictive and can cause a variety of medical symptoms, as demonstrated by a case study published online April 2 in the American Journal on Addictions.

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Perceived Depression Stigma Among Latinos Can Hinder Care

FRIDAY, April 2 (HealthDay News) -- Latinos who suffer from depression and who perceive a stigma associated with the condition are less likely to take medications, manage symptoms or show up for doctor appointments, according to a study in March/April issue of General Hospital Psychiatry.

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Atrial Fibrillation Linked to Increased Dementia Risk

FRIDAY, April 2 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with atrial fibrillation -- especially those under 70 -- may have an increased risk of developing dementia, along with an increased risk of death after a dementia diagnosis, according to a study published in the April issue of Heart Rhythm.

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Acupuncture May Help Relieve Dental Anxiety

THURSDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with anxiety related to dental treatment, acupuncture may be an effective management strategy, according to research published in the March issue of Acupuncture in Medicine.

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