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Category: Pulmonology | Monthly Briefing

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April 2010 Briefing - Pulmonology

Last Updated: May 03, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for April 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Lung Cancer Mortality Higher in England Than Norway, Sweden

FRIDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- Despite similar national health care expenditures, the mortality rate among lung cancer patients in England is higher than in Norway or Sweden, with most of the difference in excess risk occurring shortly after diagnosis, according to a study in the May issue of Thorax.

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C-Reactive Protein Linked to Increased Lung Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated levels of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, suggesting that chronic inflammation may play a role in lung carcinogenesis, according to a study published online April 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Risk Factors for Physician Misconduct Identified

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who are male, are from lower socioeconomic groups or had academic difficulties in medical school may be at increased risk of professional misconduct, according to a study published online April 27 in BMJ.

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Radiofrequency Device Approved for Severe Chronic Asthma

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- The first device that uses radiofrequency energy to help control lung inflammation in adults with severe chronic asthma has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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ALA Report Finds Good, Bad News on Air Pollution

WEDNESDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Despite reductions in particle and ozone pollution in recent years, unhealthy air remains a threat to about 58 percent of Americans, according to the American Lung Association's State of the Air 2010 report.

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FDA Changes Medical Device Advisory Committee Process

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Because of the increasing number of medical device advisory panel meetings in recent years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is changing the way expert panels review and discuss information during public hearings on devices that are being reviewed for premarket approval.

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Some Tracheostomy Tubes Made by Covidien Recalled

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Covidien and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have initiated a voluntary recall of certain lots of cuffed Shiley tracheostomy tubes and custom/specialty tracheostomy tubes because pilot balloon inflation assembly leaks result in the cuffs not holding air.

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Interruptions Increase Medication Errors by Nurses

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses who are interrupted in the process of preparing and administering medications are more likely to make an error, with error severity increasing with the number of interruptions, according to a study in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Continuous Smoking Found to Accelerate Arterial Stiffening

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Continuous heavy smoking may speed up the age-associated progression of structural stiffening of large- to mid-sized arteries, and there is a dose-response relationship between consumption of cigarettes and accelerated arterial stiffening, according to a study in the May 4 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Financial Ties Negatively Affect Perceptions of Research Quality

TUESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Disclosure of financial ties to industry influences patients', physicians', and research participants' beliefs about the quality of research evidence, according to a review published in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Most Doctors Not Knowledgeable About Herbals

MONDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians are not knowledgeable about herbal medicines and believe the general public is poorly informed as well, according to the results of a survey published in the April issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

DTB Survey on Herbal Medicines

More Lung Cancers Detected With Full Field of View

FRIDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of lung cancer detected at cardiac computed tomography (CT) is 0.31 percent, with most of the malignancies at resectable stages; however, when a limited field of view (FOV) is used at cardiac scanning, a large majority of lung cancers detected at full thoracic scanning are missed, according to research published in the May issue of Radiology.

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Low-Dose CT Linked to High False-Positive Rates

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- The risks for false-positive results on lung cancer screening tests are substantial after two yearly examinations, especially with low-dose computed tomography (CT), according to a study in the April 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Switching Beta-Blockers Tied to Airway Function Changes

TUESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Switching between the nonselective beta-blocker carvedilol and the β1-selective beta-blockers metoprolol succinate and bisoprolol is well tolerated but leads to changes in airway function in patients with chronic heart failure, particularly those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in the April 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Review Finds Surprisingly High Death Rate for Kids' Choking

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital admissions for airway foreign body and esophageal foreign body airway obstruction in pediatric patients occur infrequently, but are associated with a surprisingly high mortality rate, according to a review published in the April issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Secondhand Smoke Linked to Chronic Rhinosinusitis

MONDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is common in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and many cases of CRS may be directly attributable to the SHS exposure, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Early AMD, Lung Function Not Linked in Mixed-Race Cohort

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- In a mixed racial/ethnic cohort, early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and lung function were not associated, except among the subset of subjects who had ever smoked, according to a study in the April issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Quality Improvement Process Benefits ICU Patients

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute respiratory failure who are in intensive care, implementation of a quality improvement process involving a multidisciplinary team is associated with significant improvements in intensive care unit delirium, physical rehabilitation and functional mobility, and a decreased length of stay, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

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Respiratory Syncytial Virus Exacts Global Toll in Children

FRIDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) may be responsible for acute lower-respiratory infections (ALRIs) that kill nearly 200,000 children younger than 5 worldwide each year, according to a review published online April 16 in The Lancet.

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Many Youths With Respiratory Conditions Use Inhalants

THURSDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- More than 4 percent of adolescents ages 12 to 17 have used an inhalant in the past year, including many with a respiratory condition such as pneumonia, bronchitis, asthma or sinusitis, according to The National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

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Mouth Breathing May Lead to Medical, Other Problems

THURSDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Health care professionals may be unaware of the physical, medical and social problems associated with mouth breathing, but it is important for the entire health care community -- including dentists -- to screen for and diagnose the condition to prevent these problems, according to an article in the January/February issue of General Dentistry.

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Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Progression to Active TB

THURSDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Low vitamin D levels are associated with progression to active tuberculosis in healthy household contacts of tuberculosis patients, according to a study published online April 14 in Emerging Infectious Diseases. Another study in the same journal found a high prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among drug users, female sex workers, and homeless individuals in Tijuana, Mexico.

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CDC: Adults With Depression More Likely to Smoke

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with depression are more likely to smoke and be heavier smokers, and are less likely to quit smoking, compared to those without depression, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Prostate Cancer Linked to Thromboembolism

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate cancer patients -- especially those receiving endocrine therapy -- have an increased risk of thromboembolism, according to a study published online April 14 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Seven Metered-Dose Inhalers to Be Phased Out

WEDNESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Seven metered-dose inhalers that contain ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons will be gradually removed from the U.S. marketplace, according to an April 13 announcement by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Report Addresses Lung Cancer Rate in African-Americans

TUESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- African-Americans are more likely to develop lung cancer -- and to die from it -- than any other population group in the United States, and a new report by the American Lung Association provides information to help stakeholders understand and address the issue.

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Floppy Eyelid Syndrome Linked to Keratoconus, Sleep Apnea

FRIDAY, April 9 (HealthDay News) -- Floppy eyelid syndrome (FES) seems to be strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and keratoconus, and both medial canthal and lateral canthal plication and upper lid lateral tarsal strip provide better survival outcomes for FES patients than full-thickness wedge excision, according to two studies published in the April issue of Ophthalmology.

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14 States, D.C. Increased Cigarette Excise Taxes in 2009

FRIDAY, April 9 (HealthDay News) -- Several states and the District of Columbia increased their cigarette excise taxes in 2009, and half of states now have minimum price laws for cigarettes, though new revenue is not being dedicated to tobacco control, according to two reports published in the April 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Even Mild Sleep Apnea May Raise Risk of Stroke in Men

FRIDAY, April 9 (HealthDay News) -- While severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is linked with increased risk of stroke in men and women, men with even mild to moderate OSA may also be at increased risk, according to research published online March 25 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Pathway Can Identify Smokers Most at Risk for Lung Cancer

THURSDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Biochemical signals in the lungs of current and former smokers may help identify those most likely to develop lung cancer, and this sequence of chemical reactions can be reversed before cancer starts by a potential lung cancer drug, according to a study in the April 7 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Prototype of 'Electronic Nose' Successfully Diagnoses Asthma

WEDNESDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- The prototype of an "electronic nose," a device that analyzes exhaled breath for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), is able to diagnose asthma better than standard lung function tests and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), and its diagnostic performance can be increased when it is combined with FENO, according to a study in the April issue of Chest.

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Oral Immunotherapy Shows Promise in Treating COPD

TUESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with the non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae oral immunotherapeutic HI-164OV may reduce the number and severity of exacerbations in people with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in the April issue of Chest.

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Elderly on Antipsychotics at Higher Risk for Pneumonia

TUESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients taking antipsychotic medication are at a dose-dependent increased risk of developing community-acquired pneumonia, according to a study published in the April 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Influenza Vaccination Coverage Remains Inadequate

THURSDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- While 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) or seasonal influenza vaccination was higher among health care personnel (HCP) than previous seasons, a wide variation in 2009 H1N1 state-specific vaccination rates suggests improvement opportunities in upcoming seasons, according to interim results of two reports published in the April 2 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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