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Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

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May 2010 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: June 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for May 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Selenium Inversely Linked to Gastric, Esophageal Cancers

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Selenium status appears to be inversely associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA), and there may also be an inverse association between esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and selenium status in certain subgroups, according to a study published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

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Hepatitis B Carrier Status Tied to Increased Liver Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with inactive hepatitis B virus (HBV) have a substantially higher risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver-related death than those not infected with the virus, according to a study in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

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Women With IBD at Lower Risk for Colorectal Cancer Than Men

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) than men with the disease, according to a study published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

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FDA: Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted consumers and health care providers regarding the potential increased risk of hip, wrist and spine fractures associated with high doses or long-term use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs).

FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting Program
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Alfalfa Sprouts Recalled Due to Salmonella Outbreak

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Caldwell Fresh Foods has issued a recall of raw alfalfa sprouts due to a Salmonella Newport outbreak in 10 states, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Cesarean Delivery and Celiac Disease Significantly Associated

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- There is a significant association between cesarean delivery and celiac disease but not Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, according to research published online May 17 in Pediatrics.

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NSAIDs Reduce Risks for Gastric Cancer in Ulcer Patients

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with peptic ulcer disease who take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are at reduced risk for the future development of gastric cancer, especially if the ulcer is associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, according to a study published online May 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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FDA Clears Use of Rotavirus Vaccine, Rotarix

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of the RotaTeq (RV5) vaccine is associated with a reduction in hospitalizations for acute gastroenteritis in children under 5, according to research published in the June 1 Journal of Infectious Diseases. And the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced that health care professionals can resume using the vaccine Rotarix, and continue using RotaTeq, to prevent rotavirus in children.

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Pernicious Anemia Patients at Higher Risk for Hip Fractures

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Even after years of vitamin B-12 therapy, people with pernicious anemia are still at increased risk for hip fractures, which suggests a mechanism other than B-12 deficiency could be driving their vulnerability, according to research published in the April issue of Gastroenterology.

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Many General Internists Leave Field by Mid-Career

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Roughly one out of six general internists are leaving internal medicine by mid-career, a substantially higher proportion compared to internal medicine subspecialists, according to survey results published April 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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FDA Warns of Safety Concern Related to Eltrombopag

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and GlaxoSmithKline have alerted health care professionals of a new safety concern in patients with thrombocytopenia resulting from chronic liver disease treated with eltrombopag (Promacta).

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Interval Colorectal Cancer Risk Linked to Colonoscopy Quality

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) in the interval between screening colonoscopy and follow-up surveillance colonoscopy is greater for patients whose endoscopists have lower adenoma detection rates, according to research published in the May 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New FDA Program Targets Misleading Drug Advertising

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced the launch of a new program to educate health care providers regarding their role in making certain that advertisements and promotions for prescription drugs are truthful and not misleading.

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Benefits Found Lacking for High-Dose Proton Pump Inhibitors

TUESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with high doses of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is not associated with reduced rates of rebleeding, surgical intervention, or death in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers compared to non-high-dose PPI treatment, according to a meta-analysis published in the May 10 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine alongside several other studies that explore the side effects associated with PPIs.

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CDC: California Increases HBV Vaccination in At-Risk Adults

FRIDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- In California, a public health project initiative has increased hepatitis B vaccinations among at-risk adults. However, in the United States there is an increasing incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma -- which often results from hepatitis B infection, according to two reports published in the May 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Participation of Fellow in Colonoscopies Boosts Detection

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- When gastrointestinal (GI) fellows -- especially third-year fellows -- are involved in the performance of routine screening colonoscopies, the detection rates for adenomas and polyps are increased, according to a study in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Noncardia Gastric Cancer Rate Up in Young White Adults

TUESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of noncardia gastric cancer has declined overall in America since the late 1970s but increased among whites aged 25 to 39, and the use of adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer is associated with lower mortality risk compared to surgery alone, according to two studies in the May 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Anderson
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Abstract - Paoletti
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Anti-Reflux Surgery Not Seen to Prevent Esophageal Cancers

MONDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to arguments supporting the theory that anti-reflux surgery prevents the subsequent development of esophageal and cardia cancers, it does not appear to have any such preventive benefit, according to research published in the April issue of Gastroenterology.

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