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Category: Internal Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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May 2010 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Last Updated: June 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for May 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Most Lumbar Disc Herniation Occurs Spontaneously

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) usually occurs without any inciting event, and when there is an inciting event, it is not associated with a more severe presentation, according to a study in the May issue of The Spine Journal.

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Less Frequent Toothbrushing Linked to Heart Disease

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Poor oral hygiene is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as higher concentrations of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen, according to research published online May 27 in BMJ.

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Use of Statins After Stroke Increasing Slowly

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of stroke patients given prescriptions for evidence-based statin treatment at hospital discharge has increased over time, but nearly one in five still leaves the hospital without a prescription, according to research published online May 27 in Stroke.

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Cardiac Event Biomarker Linked to Volume Overload

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among stable hemodialysis patients, N-terminal probrain type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) may not be associated with cardiac dysfunction but appears to be dependent on factors associated with volume overload, and may also be elevated in those with malnutrition, according to a study published online May 27 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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CRP, D-Dimer Levels Don't Affect Statin-Mortality Link

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- In peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients, statin use is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and all-cause mortality, though this association is not influenced by baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) or D-dimer levels, according to research published in the May 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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CT Contrast Agents May Cause Delayed Adverse Reactions

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed adverse reactions (DARs) occur more frequently in patients undergoing contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) than in those undergoing unenhanced CT, according to a study in the June issue of Radiology.

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Statins May Reduce Revision Risk After Hip Arthroplasty

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of revision after primary total hip arthroplasty is lower among those using statins than those not on statins, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Depression Key Consideration in Acute Coronary Syndrome

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Health care providers should address depressive symptoms in survivors of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), especially women, whose early recovery may differ from their male counterparts, according to a prospective longitudinal study published in the May issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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More Systemic Inflammation May Mean Higher CAD Risk

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- There appears to be a positive, independent and dose-dependent relation between systemic inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and homocysteine, and the estimated 10-year risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), according to research published in the May 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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In Diabetes Patients at Low CVD Risk, Aspirin Not Recommended

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is reasonable for adults with diabetes who are at increased CVD risk but should not be routinely recommended for those at low CVD risk, according to a combined statement from the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, and the American College of Cardiology Foundation, published online May 27 in Circulation, Diabetes Care, and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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CDC Outlines State Health-Care-Associated Infection Data

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention outlined state health-care-associated infection (HAI) data during a telebriefing on May 27 to coincide with a report in the May 28 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Exenatide, Rosiglitazone Combo Beneficial in Type 2 Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of exenatide and rosiglitazone to metformin in type 2 diabetes is associated with glycemic control benefits, improvements in β-cell function and insulin sensitivity, and weight loss, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

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Analysis Questions Quality of Direct-to-Consumer Ads

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) for urological medications lacks research data or references to substantiate the claims they make, pointing to room for improvement in the information offered by such advertisements, according to an analysis published in the May issue of Urology.

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Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Stem Cell Research Amended

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- The National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) have released amended voluntary guidelines for the ethical conduct of research involving human embryonic stem (hES) cells.

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Indoor Tanning Beds/Booths Increase Melanoma Risk

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Use of indoor tanning equipment substantially increases the risk of melanoma, with the highest risk found for people who use high-speed/intensity and high-pressure indoor tanning beds, according to a report published online May 26 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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FDA: Baxter Recalling Hyaluronidase Human Injection

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Baxter International Inc. has announced a voluntary recall of hyaluronidase human injection (Hylenex recombinant), as particulate matter was found in a limited number of vials during standard stability testing.

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Early Glycemic Control Vital in Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Intense glycemic control early on should be attempted for individuals with type 1 diabetes to reduce the risk of complications related to diabetes arising over time, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes.

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Antiretroviral Therapy Greatly Cuts HIV Partner Transmission

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- In heterosexual HIV-1 patients, antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce the risk of HIV transmission to sexual partners by 92 percent, according to research published online May 27 in The Lancet.

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Inflammatory Biomarker Linked to CHD in Type 2 Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- The newly recognized inflammatory biomarker lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) appears to be a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) in people with type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes.

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Selenium Inversely Linked to Gastric, Esophageal Cancers

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Selenium status appears to be inversely associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA), and there may also be an inverse association between esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and selenium status in certain subgroups, according to a study published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

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FDA Changes Label on Weight-Loss Drug Orlistat

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted health care providers and consumers regarding a label change to the weight-loss drug orlistat, marketed by prescription by F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. as Xenical (orlistat 120 mg) and over-the-counter (OTC) without a prescription by GSK Consumer Healthcare as Alli (orlistat 60 mg), due to the potential but rare risk of severe liver injury.

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Stents, Endarterectomy Equally Effective at Preventing Stroke

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Carotid-artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy are equally effective in preventing stroke in the long term, according to a study published online May 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with its presentation at the European Stroke Conference, held from May 25 to 28 in Barcelona, Spain.

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Laser Balloon Succeeds at Pulmonary Vein Isolation

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Acute pulmonary vein isolation can be achieved in pulmonary veins by using a compliant, variable diameter, visually-guided laser balloon with point-by-point ablative capability, according to research published online May 26 in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

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New Tramadol Label Warns of Suicide, Overdose Risks

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Ortho-McNeil-Janssen have alerted health care professionals of changes to the prescribing information warnings section for tramadol, a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic used to manage moderate to moderately severe chronic pain.

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Single Lens Distance Glasses May Reduce Falls

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Older individuals who wear multifocal glasses and take part in regular outdoor activity may prevent falls by using single lens distance glasses for outside use; however, this intervention may be harmful in those who wear multifocal glasses and take part in limited outdoor activity, according to a study published online May 25 in BMJ.

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Insulin Use May Lower Cancer Risk in Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- In Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes, the use of insulin appears protective against the development of cancer, though hyperglycemia may increase cancer risk, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes.

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Benefit Seen From High-Protein Diet, Resistance Exercise

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight individuals with type 2 diabetes, a high-protein, restricted-energy diet in combination with resistance exercise training is associated with particular improvements in body weight and composition when compared with other approaches, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

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FDA: Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted consumers and health care providers regarding the potential increased risk of hip, wrist and spine fractures associated with high doses or long-term use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs).

FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting Program
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Early Antibiotics in COPD Hospitalizations Beneficial

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients hospitalized for exacerbations of their illness who receive antibiotic treatment within the first two days of their hospitalization fare better than those who do not, according to research published in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hypertension Control Hits Healthy People 2010 Goal

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of hypertensive patients with control of the condition has reached a Healthy People 2010 goal, though rates of hypertension have remained unchanged during the past decade, according to research published in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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New Rule Reduces Low-Yield Outpatient Imaging Exams

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- A rule that prevents medical support staff from completing computerized orders for outpatient imaging exams that have a high likelihood of being negative results in fewer low-yield examinations and an increased percentage of tests ordered by clinicians themselves, according to a study in the June issue of Radiology.

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Lumizyme Approved for Non-Infantile Pompe Disease

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Lumizyme (alglucosidase alfa) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat late-onset Pompe disease, a genetic disorder that often leads to fatal respiratory failure.

Pompe Disease

Increasing Exercise Linked to Decreasing Obesity in Women

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- In adult women, there is a crude, graded inverse dose-response relationship between total volume of leisure-time physical activity and obesity, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Moderate Drinkers' Health Better Than Non-Drinkers'

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate drinkers have a better health status than non-drinkers or heavy drinkers, but moderate alcohol consumption may be a marker, rather than a cause, of this status, according to research published May 19 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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H1N1 in Pregnant Women Is Serious Threat to Fetuses

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women admitted to the hospital with pandemic novel influenza A(H1N1) are at increased risk for abdominal and gastrointestinal symptoms, fetal distress and mortality, emergency cesarean delivery, and premature births, according to research published in the May 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Survivors of Childhood Cancer Less Healthy as Adults

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Adult survivors of childhood cancers appear to suffer worse health outcomes and more job limitations than people who never had cancer, according to research published online May 24 in Cancer.

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Frequent Doctor Visits Benefit Hypertensive Diabetes Patients

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- In hypertensive patients with diabetes, shorter intervals between encounters with physicians are associated with a faster decrease in blood pressure and earlier blood pressure normalization -- particularly intervals shorter than those currently recommended, according to a study published online May 24 in Hypertension.

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β-Blockers May Be Beneficial in Treating COPD

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients taking β-blockers may have a decreased risk of exacerbations, as well as a decreased mortality risk, according to research published in the May 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Sugar-Sweetened Beverages May Affect Blood Pressure

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) has a significant association with decreased blood pressure, according to research published online May 24 in Circulation.

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Alfalfa Sprouts Recalled Due to Salmonella Outbreak

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Caldwell Fresh Foods has issued a recall of raw alfalfa sprouts due to a Salmonella Newport outbreak in 10 states, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Visceral Fat, Total Brain Volume Inversely Associated

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged adults, abdominal fat -- especially visceral fat -- is inversely associated with total brain volume, according to research published online May 20 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Recent Outbreak of Dengue in Key West Raises Concern

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- A recent outbreak of 28 dengue cases in Key West, Fla., should prompt clinicians to consider dengue in diagnosing patients who live in or have recently traveled to subtropical parts of the United States, according to a report published in the May 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Many Women Age 40 and Older Avoid Follow-Up Eye Care

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Despite self-reported diagnoses of diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), many women aged 40 and older do not receive eye care in the recommended follow-up period due to cost, lack of insurance coverage, or believing there is no reason for follow-up care, according to a report published in the May 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Major Pool Code Violations Common in United States

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Swimming pool operation violations are relatively common in the United States, with almost one out of eight inspections resulting in immediate pool closure because of serious code violations, according to a report published in the May 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Low Phosphorus Linked to Early Death in HIV Therapy

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Low blood phosphorus levels are associated with high death rates among HIV-infected patients beginning antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa, according to a study published online May 18 in PLoS ONE.

Abstract
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Most Uninsured Young Adults May Gain Health Insurance

FRIDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, there are 13.7 million uninsured young adults, and most of them could gain health insurance coverage under the recently passed Affordable Care Act, according to a report released today by the Commonwealth Fund.

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Metformin Associated With Decreased B-12

FRIDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients being treated with metformin to control their diabetes may have a higher risk of decreased levels of vitamin B-12 and increased homocysteine levels, according to research published in the May 20 online edition of the BMJ.

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Statins Have Wide Range of Unintended Adverse Effects

FRIDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Statins appear to have no significant association with a large number of diseases, but they may have a wide range of unintended adverse effects, according to data published in the May 20 online edition of the BMJ.

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Article Addresses Suicide Risks for Seniors in Residential Homes

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly residents of communal living facilities are at risk of suicidal behaviors that may be due to their underlying reasons for moving into the residential homes, and public health systems and residential communities should take steps to counter these behaviors, according to an article published online May 18 in PLoS Medicine.

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Self-Reported Peanut, Tree Nut Allergies in Children on the Rise

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Although the number of adults allergic to peanuts, tree nuts and sesame seems to have remained relatively stable since 1997, the prevalence of self-reported peanut and tree nut allergies in children has climbed substantially, according to research published online May 12 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Abstract
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Faster Weight Loss Appears to Yield Better Results

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- People who lose greater amounts of weight initially in weight-loss attempts may experience better weight loss and maintenance results than those who lose weight gradually, according to research published in the June issue of the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

Abstract
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Muscle Fatigue Linked to Decreased Postural Stability

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with no low back pain who have had inspiratory muscles fatigue (IMF) use a postural control strategy similar to that of patients with low back pain, resulting in decreased postural stability and suggesting that IMF might have a role in the high recurrence rate of low back pain (LBP), according to research published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Vitamin D Insufficiency Common in Young Women

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. women of childbearing age have vitamin D insufficiency, and the current recommended dosage for prenatal vitamin D supplementation may need to be increased to reach recommended levels, according to a study in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Botox Injections Resolve Chronic Cough

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Injection with botulinum toxin type A (BtxA) can resolve chronic cough caused by laryngeal hypertonicity and neuroplastic changes, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Long-Term Aneursym Repair Survival Rates Similar

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Survival rates are similar six years after open or endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms, though secondary interventions are more common after endovascular treatment, according to research published in the May 20 New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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With Intermediate Risk of CAD, CTCA Valuable First Test

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- As a tool for predicting the need for invasive coronary angiography (ICA), computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) appears to be most useful for patients at intermediate risk of coronary artery disease and may be more useful than stress testing in that population, according to research published May 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Maternal Measles Antibodies Wane by 6 Months of Age

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal measles antibodies wane quickly after birth, with nearly all babies losing maternal antibody protection by age 6 months, according to research published online May 18 in the BMJ.

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Antibiotic Resistance May Persist Months After Treatment

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- After a course of antibiotics for respiratory or urinary tract infection, an individual is likely to develop resistance to the antibiotic that may persist for up to 12 months, according to research published online May 18 in the BMJ.

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Physician's Cost-Profile Differs by Insurer's Rules

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- The cost-profiling done by health plans varies substantially in methodology and can affect which cost category physicians are placed in, depending on which cost-attribution rules are used, according to research published May 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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TB Global Fight Still Has a Way to Go

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Even though 36 million people worldwide were cured of tuberculosis and 6 million lives were saved between 1995 and 2008, the disease still takes a substantial toll and long-term goals for its eradication may not be met, according to a paper published online May 19 in The Lancet, the first in a series of papers on tuberculosis.

Abstract
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Sagent Announces Recall of Metronidazole Injection

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Sagent Pharmaceuticals Inc. has announced a nationwide voluntary recall of all lots of metronidazole injection, USP 500 mg/100 mL, distributed by the company and manufactured by Claris Lifesciences, due to non-sterility in two lots of the product, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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Major Depression Prevalent After Traumatic Brain Injury

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Within the first year after traumatic brain injury (TBI), more than half of patients meet criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD), which independently predicts poorer health-related quality of life, according to research published in the May 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Learning/Management Model Effective for Anxiety Treatment

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- A blended intervention approach to anxiety treatment is superior to usual care for patients treated in primary care clinics, according to research published May 18 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fathers Show Risk of Prenatal, Postpartum Depression

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial number of expecting and new fathers have prenatal and postpartum depression, and paternal depression is moderately correlated with maternal depression, according to research published in the May 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Kidney Function Measures Predict Risk of Death

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- In the general population, a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and a high urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) are independent predictors of mortality, according to an analysis published online May 18 in The Lancet.

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In Prostate Cancer, Selective Alendronate Use Cost-Effective

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- A bone mineral density test followed by selective use of alendronate for fracture prevention in men beginning androgen deprivation therapy for localized prostate cancer is cost-effective, according to research published in the May 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Age Affects Benefits of Cochlear Implants

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients can benefit significantly from cochlear implants, though not as much as younger patients on some measures, according to a study in the May issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery. According to another study in the same journal, the substantial increase in endoscopic surgery for chronic sinus problems in the Medicare population is of uncertain value.

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Cerebral Vasoreactivity Related to Gait, Possibly Falls, in Elderly

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Impaired regulation of cerebral blood flow is associated with slowed gait and may be related to increased falls in the elderly, according to research published in the May 18 issue of the journal Neurology.

Abstract
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Vitamin A Analogues Not Linked to Fracture Risk

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- The use of vitamin A analogues such as isotretinoin and acitretin, even at high doses, is not associated with an increased risk of fractures, according to a study published in the May issue of Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Racial Disparities Reduced in Quality Monitoring Program

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals enrolled in a national quality monitoring and improvement program showed improvements in adherence to evidence-based guidelines for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), as well as reductions or elimination of racial/ethnic care disparities, according to research published May 17 in the journal Circulation.

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Many Have Low Distress During Prostate Cancer Surveillance

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Men with low-risk prostate cancer on active surveillance generally have favorably low anxiety and distress in the first nine months of surveillance, according to research published in the May issue of The Journal of Urology. Another article in the same issue examines how health status and life expectancy influenced selection of men age 75 and older for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screenings before the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended against screening them.

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A Few Preventive Health Services Could Save Many Lives

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Increased use of a few proven clinical preventive services, especially those aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease, could result in substantial improvements in health on a population-wide level, according to a study published online May 4 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Sprix Approved for Moderate-to-Severe Pain

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Roxro Pharma's Sprix (ketorolac tromethamine) nasal spray has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the short-term treatment of moderate to moderately severe pain, the manufacturer said Monday in a news release.

pain relievers

Obesity, Diabetes Associated With Low Free Testosterone

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Among obese men older than 45 years of age, 40 percent of those without diabetes and half of those with diabetes have below-normal free testosterone (FT) concentrations, according to research published online in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Common Diagnostic Tests for UTI Miss Many Infections

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Commonly used tests for diagnosing lower urinary tract infections in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms but no dysuria lack sensitivity and should be abandoned, according to research published in the May issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Patterns Changing in Substance Use Admissions

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Some patterns of substance use treatment admissions changed substantially from 1998 to 2008, according to a study published in April by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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Pernicious Anemia Patients at Higher Risk for Hip Fractures

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Even after years of vitamin B-12 therapy, people with pernicious anemia are still at increased risk for hip fractures, which suggests a mechanism other than B-12 deficiency could be driving their vulnerability, according to research published in the April issue of Gastroenterology.

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Many General Internists Leave Field by Mid-Career

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Roughly one out of six general internists are leaving internal medicine by mid-career, a substantially higher proportion compared to internal medicine subspecialists, according to survey results published April 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Interrupted Doctors Spend Less Time on Clinical Tasks

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department doctors who are interrupted may decrease the time they spend on clinical tasks and even delay or fail to return to some tasks, which could have a negative impact on patient safety, according to a study published online May 12 in Quality and Safety in Health Care.

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Neuropathic Pain Increases Related Medical Costs

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Common types of neuropathic pain, such as that associated with herpes zoster or diabetes, can add substantially to health care costs related to those conditions, according to a study reported in the April issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Stroke Sign Awareness Doesn't Translate to Calling 911

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Most adults cannot correctly identify stroke warning signs, and even those who can may not respond to them by calling 911, according to research published online May 13 in Stroke.

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Mental Health Disorders Stable Among U.K. Military Personnel

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- From 2003 to 2009, the prevalence of mental health disorders, such as anxiety and depression, among military personnel from the United Kingdom remained stable, although those deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan have an increased risk of alcohol misuse compared with those who have not been deployed, according to a study published online May 13 in The Lancet.

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FDA Warns of Safety Concern Related to Eltrombopag

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and GlaxoSmithKline have alerted health care professionals of a new safety concern in patients with thrombocytopenia resulting from chronic liver disease treated with eltrombopag (Promacta).

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Steps Per Day Linked to Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Although public health recommendations have tended to focus on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, an active lifestyle as measured by steps per day is associated with a reduced prevalence of both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, according to research published online May 4 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Environmental Exposures Can Affect Puberty in Young Girls

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Environmental exposure to the chemical classes known as phenols, phthalates and phytoestrogens may affect young girls' pubertal development, putting them at risk for health complications later in life, according to a study published online in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Excessive Antioxidants May Increase Genetic Abnormalities

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Taking excessive amounts of antioxidants, such as high-dose supplements of vitamin C and E, can increase genetic abnormalities in cells, which may raise the risk for developing cancer, according to a study published online May 4 in Stem Cells.

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Variables Help Guide Active Surveillance in Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Variables that are available at prostate cancer diagnosis and first surveillance biopsy during active surveillance can be used to inform men of the probability of an unfavorable biopsy, according to research published in the May issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Long Work Hours May Adversely Affect Heart Health

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Working overtime could be bad for heart health, as it is associated with an increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), according to research published online May 11 in the European Heart Journal.

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FDA Warns Consumers Against Swallowing Topical Benadryl

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted consumers regarding potentially serious side effects associated with mistakenly swallowing Benadryl Extra Strength Itch Stopping Gel, an over-the-counter (OTC) product intended only for topical use.

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Interval Colorectal Cancer Risk Linked to Colonoscopy Quality

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) in the interval between screening colonoscopy and follow-up surveillance colonoscopy is greater for patients whose endoscopists have lower adenoma detection rates, according to research published in the May 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Regional Disparities Seen for Diagnoses, Medicare Spending

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- There are substantial differences in diagnostic practices across U.S. regions, and policymakers looking to control Medicare costs first must understand the sources of the substantial regional differences in Medicare spending, according to a pair of studies published online May 12 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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IOM Proposes Framework for Evaluating Health Claims

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration should evaluate claims of foods' and nutritional supplements' health benefits with the same rigor it uses in evaluating approvals of medicines and medical technology, according to a new report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

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New Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Tested Effectively

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) with leads that can be implanted subcutaneously, rather than transvenously as with conventional ICDs, has successfully detected and converted ventricular fibrillation in a series of evaluation trials, according to a report published online May 12 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Removing Financial Incentives May Reduce Performance

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The focus of clinicians may change and their performance levels could drop when previously established financial incentives are removed, according to research published May 11 in BMJ.

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