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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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June 2010 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: July 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for June 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Children's Language Skills Tied to Later Psychosocial Effects

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Early receptive language skills have a significant association with adult mental health and psychosocial adjustment, according to a study published online June 29 in Pediatrics.

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Generic Effexor XR Approved

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic version of Effexor extended release capsules (venlafaxine hydrochloride) to treat major depressive disorder has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

National Library of Medicine

Maternal Smoking May Impact Child's Mental Health

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal smoking may have an intrauterine effect on child conduct and externalizing problems, and there may be a biologically mediated association between paternal smoking and increased childhood body mass index (BMI), according to two studies published online June 29 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Brion
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Abstract - Kwok
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Collegial Atmosphere Promotes Effective Child Protection Team

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital-based child protection teams (CPT) are most effective when working within a collegial, multidisciplinary environment, according to research published online June 29 in Pediatrics.

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14 Percent of Cancer Survivors Live With Minor Children

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Nationwide, an estimated 1.58 million cancer survivors live with their minor children, representing a large number of families who confront special challenges and may need additional support, according to research published online June 28 in Cancer.

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Editorial

Teen Girls More Likely to View Drug, Alcohol Use Positively

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Teenage girls are more likely than their male counterparts to perceive potential benefits -- including "self-medicating" benefits -- from drug and alcohol use, according to survey data released by the Partnership for a Drug-Free America and the MetLife Foundation.

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Hepatic Encephalopathy Linked to Chronic Cognitive Effects

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with cirrhosis, episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) may be associated with lingering and cumulative problems with learning, working memory, and response inhibition, according to research published in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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ER Visits for Prescription Drug Misuse Climbing

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- From 2004 to 2008, emergency department visits involving the non-medical use of prescription drugs increased substantially in the United States, according to research published in the June 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Sites Contain Graphic Material to Promote Eating Disorders

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Pro-eating disorder Web sites are easy to access and contain content that encourages and motivates users to continue their efforts with anorexia and bulimia, though many include recovery-oriented messages as well, according to research published online June 17 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
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Alzheimer's Risk May Be Decreased by Protective Diet

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- A dietary pattern (DP) with higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, salad dressing, nuts, fish, and poultry, and lower intakes of items including red meat and high-fat dairy products may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease by almost 40 percent, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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More Older Adults Being Treated for Substance Abuse

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of Americans 50 years of age or older being treated for abuse of illicit substances substantially increased from 1992 to 2008, according to a study sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Obesity Has Negative Impacts on Sexual Health, Behavior

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity has negative impacts on sexual health in both men and women, and young obese women are less likely to use contraceptive health care services and more likely to have unplanned pregnancies, according to a study published June 15 in BMJ.

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Scant Evidence Links Any Factor to Alzheimer's Prevention

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- There is scant evidence that any one factor -- such as exercising or following a Mediterranean diet -- is protective of cognitive decline, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), in older adults, according to a review presented at a National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science Conference and a subsequent conference statement, both published online June 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Plassman
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NIH State-of-the-Science Statement

Mental Activity May Protect Brain in Multiple Sclerosis

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of intellectual enrichment may negate the negative impact of brain atrophy in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to research published in the June 15 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Preventive Intervention for Premature Infants Effective

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- A home preventive care program for very premature infants and their caregivers results in improved behavioral and emotional regulation at age 2, as well as less depression and anxiety among caregivers, according to research published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Young Adults Focus on Health Behaviors Over Genetics

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, young adults tend to favor health behaviors over genetics as the cause of common preventable diseases, but those with more behavioral risk factors were more likely to lean toward genetic explanations, according to research published online June 8 in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

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Music Decreases Pain, Anxiety During Bone Marrow Biopsy

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Listening to music during bone marrow biopsy and aspiration can reduce both anxiety and pain intensity during the procedure, according to research published in the June issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
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Suppressed Anger in CAD Linked to Adverse Cardiac Events

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), suppressing anger is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiac events, according to research published in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Alcohol Dependence Treatment Tied to Social Cost Savings

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment for alcohol dependence may result in reduced median social costs associated with arrests, vehicle accidents and health care, according to a study in the May issue of Medical Care.

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Stress Reduction Aids Survival in Recurrent Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with recurrent breast cancer who had psychological intervention for stress reduction during their initial disease deal better with the stress of disease recurrence and even improve their odds for survival over the long term, according to a study published online June 8 in Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Secondhand Smoke Linked to Psychological Distress

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among healthy adults is associated with psychological distress and risk of future psychiatric illness, according to a cross-sectional and longitudinal study published online June 7 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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One-Third of Veterans May Experience PTSD, Depression

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Up to a third of veterans returning from combat may experience depression or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often along with alcohol misuse or aggressive behavior comorbidity, and the risk of developing dementia is nearly twice as high in veterans with PTSD as in those without, according to the results of two studies published in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Thomas
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Abstract - Yaffe
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Fatal Medication Errors Rise in July at Teaching Hospitals

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- In July there is a significant increase in fatal medication errors at medical institutions, and this spike is at least partly due to the arrival of new medical residents, according to a study published online May 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Several Factors Tied to Higher Depression Risk in Internship

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Several individual, internship and genetic factors are associated with the marked increase in depressive symptoms experienced by medical interns, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Genetics Implicated in Disordered Gambling in Women

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic factors contribute to the etiology of disordered gambling (DG) among women, as they do among men, and susceptibility genes that contribute to variation in liability for DG probably greatly overlap between the two sexes, according to a study in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Negative Effects of Having Premature Baby Seldom Last

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- The negative impacts on mothers and families of having an extremely low birth weight (ELBW) child appear to be minimal by the time the child reaches young adulthood, except for an ongoing negative effect on parents' jobs, according to research published online June 7 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Young Men With the Lowest IQs at Higher Risk of Suicide

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Lower intelligence quotient (IQ) scores in young men are associated with a higher risk of future suicide, but the relationship does not hold true for men who are identified as having psychosis, according to research published June 3 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Non-Married at Greater Risk of Hospitalization for Sepsis

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Single, separated, and widowed adults have a higher risk of hospitalization for sepsis than do their married peers, and some face higher mortality rates as well, according to research published in the June issue of Chest.

Abstract
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CDC: Many U.S. Teens Have Abused Prescription Drugs

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- One in five students high school students in the United States has abused prescription drugs at some point, according to the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, released June 3 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Caregiving Stress May Impair Endothelial Function

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- The stress of caring for a spouse with Alzheimer's disease may increase the risk of cardiovascular events due to impaired endothelial functioning, according to research published in the June 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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RA Patients and Physicians Differ on Disease Severity

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-third of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients assess the severity of their disease differently than their rheumatologists do, with the disparity most pronounced for patients with higher depressive symptoms, according to a study in the June issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
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Antidepressants May Increase Cataract Risk in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Older people who take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be at increased risk for developing cataracts, according to research published in Ophthalmology.

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Antidepressants Associated With Miscarriage

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Use of antidepressants during pregnancy, particularly paroxetine, venlafaxine, or a combination of different antidepressant classes, may increase the risk of miscarriage by 68 percent, according to research published online May 31 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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