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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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July 2010 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: August 02, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for July 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Specialties See Modest Compensation Increases in '09

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Most medical specialties saw modest compensation increases in 2009, but many provider organizations are still operating at a substantial loss, according to the findings of the American Medical Group Association's (AMGA) 2010 Medical Group Compensation and Financial Survey.

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Many Visit Emergency Room in Year Prior to Suicide

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Many mental health patients who later commit suicide visit the emergency department in the year prior to their death, with some individuals visiting frequently, according to a study published online July 26 in the Emergency Medical Journal.

Abstract
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Cosmetic Dermatology Patients More Likely to Have BDD

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is relatively common in dermatology patients, and it is more common in those seeking cosmetic treatments than in other dermatology patients, according to research published in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Scoliosis Patients May Have Worse Perceived Health Status

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- People with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) may have perceived mental and physical health that is moderately, albeit significantly, worse than those without the condition, according to twin-based research published in the August issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Social Relationships Linked to Improved Survival

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Having stronger social relationships is associated with an increased likelihood of survival, with a magnitude of effect that's comparable to quitting smoking, according to research published online July 27 in PLoS Medicine.

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Risk of Poor Outcomes Up for Seniors With Delirium in Hospital

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who experience delirium during hospitalization are at elevated risk for death, eventual institutionalization, and dementia, according to a meta-analysis published in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Maternal Affection in Infancy Predicts Distress in Adulthood

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of maternal affection during infancy are associated with lower levels of emotional distress in adulthood, according to a study published online July 26 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Some Epilepsy Drugs Linked to Self-Harm, Suicidal Behavior

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that are associated with a high risk of depression may have an elevated risk of self-harm or suicidal behavior, but other groups of AEDs do not appear to carry this risk, according to research published in the July 27 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Depression May Compromise Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Symptoms of major depression in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are often missed during routine clinical interviews, and the presence of depression hinders treatment outcomes; in addition, HCV is associated with greater absence from work, lower productivity, and higher health care costs, according to two articles published in the August issue of Hepatology.

Abstract - Leutscher
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Abstract - Su
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Self-Care Program May Help Nurses Manage Stress

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- A psycho-educational self-care program that helps nurses develop stress management plans may be useful in improving emotional exhaustion levels, according to a study in the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Abstract
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Ecstasy May Help Relieve Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- The drug ±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as ecstasy, appears to be effective in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) without evidence of harming patients, according to research published online July 19 in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

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Prenatal Anxiety in Moms Tied to Higher Infant Illness Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Babies whose mothers experience prenatal stress and anxiety appear to be at higher risk for illnesses and require more antibiotics in their first year of life, according to research published online July 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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5.2 Percent of Residency Applicant Essays Plagiarized

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- About 5 percent of the application essays to residency programs -- often referred to as the personal statement -- contain plagiarized material, according to research published in the July 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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More Homeless Finish Advance Directives With Intervention

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Counselor-assisted end-of-life planning for homeless people significantly increases the rate of completion of advance directives in this population, according to research published in the July issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Study Notes Eating Issues in Children With ASD

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) appear to have feeding-related issues starting in infancy, and eat a less-varied diet starting at a young age, although their growth and energy intake are not impaired compared with children without ASD, according to research published online July 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Depression Linked to Erectile Dysfunction May Raise CV Risk

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Depressive symptoms in men with erectile dysfunction (ED) constitute an independent risk factor for the incidence of a major cardiovascular event (MACE), according to a study published online July 13 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
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Stress in Pregnancy May Contribute to Preterm Birth

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience severe life events stress during the first or second trimester of pregnancy may be at increased risk for delivering preterm babies and infants with low birth weight, according to research published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Admissions for Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse Rising

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Substance abuse admissions involving prescription pain reliever abuse increased from 2.2 to 9.8 percent between 1998 and 2008 in those aged 12 and older, according to a recent study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Pain and Depression Dim Work Expectations After Whiplash

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Among people who suffer whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) resulting from a car accident, those in the most pain and those with depression symptoms appear to have the lowest expectations of returning to work, according to a study in the July 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Children's Mental Health Affected by 9/11 Attack

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Preschool children exposed to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City were found to be at increased risk of having behavioral and psychological problems if their mothers suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, according to a study in the July/August issue of Child Development. According to a related study in the same journal, direct exposure to the attacks was also associated with depression and PTSD in adolescents and their mothers.

Abstract - Chemtob
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Abstract - Gershoff
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Alzheimer's Patients Have Diminished Emotional Response

THURSDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- People with Alzheimer's disease appear to experience emotions less intensely than those without the disease, according to a study of a small group of Alzheimer's disease patients published in the Spring issue of the Journal of Neuropsychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences.

Abstract
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Lower Alcohol Use Rate Seen in American Indians, Alaska Natives

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of alcohol use in the past month among American Indians and Alaska Natives is lower than the national average, but these groups have higher-than-average rates of binge drinking, according to a report published June 24 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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BMI Linked to Poorer Cognitive Function in Older Women

THURSDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among postmenopausal women, higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with poorer cognitive function in those with a smaller waist-to-hip ratio, according to research published online July 14 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
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Self-Hypnosis, Video Training Help Tourette Patients

WEDNESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- In children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome, adding videotape training to self-hypnosis instruction is associated with improvements in tic control after very few sessions, according to a case series reported in the July/August issue of the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Phone Therapy Reduces PTSD After Stem Cell Transplant

WEDNESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- A series of telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions can significantly improve symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and general distress after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT), according to research published online July 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Attempted Method Predicts Later Successful Suicide

WEDNESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- The method a person chooses to attempt suicide appears to be predictive of whether they will attempt suicide again and succeed, with attempts involving hanging, firearms or explosives, drowning, gassing, or jumping from a height at least moderately associated with later successful suicide, according to research published July 13 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Physicians Don't Report Incompetent Colleagues

TUESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- While physicians generally acknowledge their responsibility to report an impaired or incompetent colleague to authorities, many do not actually report incompetent colleagues when faced with this situation, according to the results of a survey published in the July 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Telecare Management Lowers Pain, Depression in Cancer

TUESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- A centralized telephone-based care management approach combined with automated symptom monitoring can improve pain and depression in patients with cancer, according to a study published in the July 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Vitamins E, D Linked to Cognitive Benefits in Later Life

TUESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intake of vitamin E appears to lower risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, while older individuals with low vitamin D levels appear more likely to experience cognitive decline, according to two studies published in the July Archives of Neurology and the July 12 Archives of Internal Medicine, respectively.

Abstract - Devore
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Abstract - Llewellyn
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Massage, Humor Do Not Help Stem Cell Transplant Patients

MONDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Complementary interventions, including massage, humor therapy, and relaxation/imagery, for children undergoing stem cell transplants and their parents aren't associated with significant benefits for the children, according to a study published online July 12 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Infant Heart Defects Linked to Pregnancy Bupropion Use

MONDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal use of bupropion during early pregnancy appears to have a modest positive association with left outflow tract heart defects in infants, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Personalized Video May Be Useful Anti-Smoking Tool

FRIDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- A personalized video that simulates the impact of a myocardial infarction for smokers could be useful as a smoking cessation tool, according to research published in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Youths With Diabetes Have Higher Psychiatric Morbidity

FRIDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Young people with type 1 diabetes report levels of psychosocial well-being at diagnosis similar to those of their peers without diabetes, but over time they are more likely to experience higher rates of psychiatric morbidity and lower rates of school completion, and there may be an association between mental/emotional distress and poor metabolic control, according to research published in the July issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Blood Protein Reflects Severity and Progression in Alzheimer's

THURSDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated plasma concentration of clusterin is associated with Alzheimer's disease pathology, severity, and rate of clinical progression, according to research published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Many Doctors in Specialties Other Than Their Early Choices

WEDNESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Ten years after graduation, approximately one-fourth of doctors work in a specialty other than the one they chose in their third year post-graduation, according to research published online July 6 in BMJ.

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Editorial

Bridge Barrier Fails to Lower Toronto's Suicide Rate

WEDNESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- The construction of a barrier to prevent suicide on a Toronto bridge that had the world's second-highest rate of suicide by jumping prevented suicides at that specific location, but the overall rate of suicide by jumping in Toronto remained the same, according to research published online July 6 in BMJ.

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Editorial

Children With Migraine Do Not Have More Psychiatric Problems

WEDNESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Children with migraine do not, as previously thought, have more psychiatric and social problems than healthy children, according to a review article published online July 5 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Generalized Anxiety Linked to Poor Cardiac Outcomes in CHD

WEDNESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD), and disease severity does not explain this association, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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'Cyberbullying' Linked to Teen Psychiatric, Social Issues

TUESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Being a "cyberbully" (bullying others via electronic means) or a "cybervictim" (being the target of cyberbullying) -- and especially being both -- is associated with psychiatric and psychosomatic problems among adolescents, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Later Start at High School Linked to Student Benefits

TUESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Delaying school start time from 8 to 8:30 a.m. is associated with improvements in mood, alertness, and health among high-school students, according to research published in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression Linked to Higher Risk of Alzheimer's, Dementia

TUESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is associated with a higher risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in older people over long-term follow-up, according to research published in the July 6 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Older Adults Watch More TV Than Younger Individuals

MONDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults watch more television than young and middle-aged adults, but they enjoy it less than younger individuals, according to research published online June 29 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Underage Drinking Emergency Room Visits Rise Over Holiday

FRIDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department visits for underage drinking almost doubled during the Fourth of July weekend in 2008, according to a new study from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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In Mentally Ill, Premature Mortality Significantly Higher

FRIDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with the general population, people who have serious mental illness lose significantly more years of potential life, and differences in cause of death do not explain this disparity, according to research published in the July issue of Psychiatric Services.

Abstract
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Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis May Temporarily Up Depression Risk

FRIDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although awareness of a type 2 diabetes diagnosis may temporarily increase the risk of depressive symptoms, it is unlikely that awareness of the diagnosis will have a lasting effect on depression risk, according to research published in the July issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Report Addresses Physician Financial Conflicts in Care

THURSDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) urges U.S. teaching hospitals to establish policies that ensure financial relationships between physicians and industry do not result in conflicts of interest that influence patient care.

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In Women, Early Life Activity Cuts Cognitive Impairment Risk

THURSDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have been physically active at any point in their lives -- but especially during the teenage years -- are at lower risk of developing cognitive impairment in late life than women who have been inactive, according to research published online June 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
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Patterns in Substance Abuse Admits for Pregnant Teens Shift

THURSDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Between 1992 and 2007, there was a substantial increase in the proportion of pregnant teens admitted for treatment of marijuana and methamphetamine abuse -- though the proportion of admissions for alcohol abuse declined over that time period; and admissions are up among Hispanic pregnant teens and down among black and non-Hispanic white pregnant teens, according to a report issued June 28 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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