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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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July 2010 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: August 02, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for July 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Higher Pediatric Mortality Marked 2009/2010 Flu Season

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Since April 2009, influenza activity in the United States has been characterized by much higher pediatric mortality and higher rates of hospitalization in children and young adults than seen in previous years, according a report published in the July 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Flu Vaccine for Upcoming Season Approved

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The annual flu vaccine for the 2010-2011 influenza season has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the agency said Friday.

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Population-Based Survey Reveals Work Injury Rates

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- A module added to the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey by 10 states found that the proportion of workers work-injured in the previous year ranged from 4.0 to 6.9 per 100 employed individuals, and that the proportion of these cases paid for by workers' compensation ranged from 47 to 77 percent, according to a report published in the July 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Fecal Occult Blood Testing May Be Most Efficient Choice

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Although colonoscopy is a more accurate colorectal cancer screening method, fecal occult blood testing is likely to result in more individuals getting screened and more life-years gained, suggesting it may be the best approach for programs with limited budgets, according to a study published online July 29 in Health Affairs.

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FDA: Evamist Tied to Adverse Effects in Children, Pets

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned that unintentional exposure to estradiol transdermal spray (Evamist) through skin contact with patients using the spray may cause adverse effects in children and pets.

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Combination Weight Loss Drugs Appear Effective for Obesity

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with two obesity drugs, naltrexone and bupropion, plus lifestyle modification appears effective in helping people lose 5 percent or more of their excess body weight, according to research published online July 30 in The Lancet.

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Exercise Adherence Helps Osteoarthritis Patients

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Greater adherence to home exercise and more physical activity in general appear to enhance the long-term effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee, according to research published in the August issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Black Youths May Benefit From Higher Vitamin D Dose

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Black youths on 2000 IU/day of vitamin D achieve higher vitamin D levels more quickly and have significantly less arterial stiffness than those on 400 IU/day, according to research published online July 21 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Calcium Supplements May Increase Heart Attack Risk

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Calcium supplementation is associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction, according to a meta-analysis published online July 29 in BMJ.

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Specialties See Modest Compensation Increases in '09

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Most medical specialties saw modest compensation increases in 2009, but many provider organizations are still operating at a substantial loss, according to the findings of the American Medical Group Association's (AMGA) 2010 Medical Group Compensation and Financial Survey.

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FDA: Daptomycin May Increase Eosinophilic Pneumonia Risk

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has requested that the manufacturer of daptomycin (Cubicin) add information to its drug label regarding a possible increased risk of eosinophilic pneumonia in patients receiving the drug.

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Cuvposa Approved for Chronic Drooling in Children

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Cuvposa (glycopyrrolate) Oral Solution has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat chronic drooling in children aged 3 to 16.

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Many Visit Emergency Room in Year Prior to Suicide

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Many mental health patients who later commit suicide visit the emergency department in the year prior to their death, with some individuals visiting frequently, according to a study published online July 26 in the Emergency Medical Journal.

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Early Puberty More Likely in Obese, Overweight Girls

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese girls are likely to reach puberty earlier than their normal-weight counterparts, and are also at risk for the long-term health consequences related to obesity, according to a review published online July 29 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Thiazolidinediones May Up Fracture Risk in Older Women

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- In type 2 diabetes patients, thiazolidinedione (TZD) exposure is associated with an increased risk of fracture in women age 50 and older -- especially in higher doses -- and in men who are concurrently exposed to loop diuretics, according to research published online July 14 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Consistent Web Tool Use Linked to Weight Loss Maintenance

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who actively engage with a Web-based interactive weight maintenance tool may be more likely to maintain weight loss in the long term, according to research published in the July to September issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

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Physicians Not Good Judges of Patients' Health Beliefs

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians do not appear to be good judges of their patients' health beliefs, but they have a stronger understanding of patients' beliefs when patients take a more active role in the office visit, according to a study published online July 23 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Two Studies Offer Support for Compression-Only CPR

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Instructions from emergency dispatchers to give cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with chest compressions only or compressions with rescue breathing are associated with similar survival rates, according to two studies published in the July 29 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Scoliosis Patients May Have Worse Perceived Health Status

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- People with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) may have perceived mental and physical health that is moderately, albeit significantly, worse than those without the condition, according to twin-based research published in the August issue of Spine.

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More Leisure Time Sitting Linked to Higher Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- People who sit for six or more hours in their leisure time daily face a higher risk of mortality, with time spent sitting associated with mortality regardless of physical activity level, according to research published online July 22 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Nerve Stimulation Helps Control Overactive Bladder in Kids

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PTENS) appears effective for treating overactive bladder in children, according to research published in the August issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Predictors for Long-Term Back Pain and Disability Evaluated

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who miss work with low back pain (LBP), persistent disability and pain one year after treatment are associated with baseline pain intensity and degree of disability, diffuse tenderness, health anxiety and fear avoidance, little or moderate exercise, and having made a compensation claim, according to a study in the August issue of The Spine Journal.

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Drinking Alcohol May Thwart Rheumatoid Arthritis

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking alcohol appears to be protective against the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to be associated with less severe symptoms in those who have the condition, according to research published online July 28 in Rheumatology.

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Social Relationships Linked to Improved Survival

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Having stronger social relationships is associated with an increased likelihood of survival, with a magnitude of effect that's comparable to quitting smoking, according to research published online July 27 in PLoS Medicine.

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Actinic Keratosis Photodynamic Treatment More Painful on Face

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pain from treatment of actinic keratoses with photosensitizers varies significantly depending on the location treated, and pain decreases significantly after eight hours, according to research published in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Late Preterm Babies Still at Risk for Respiratory Morbidity

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Late preterm babies -- those born at 34 to 37 weeks' gestation -- are more likely than full-term babies to suffer respiratory distress syndrome and other respiratory morbidity, though the risk decreases with each additional week of gestation, according to research in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Risk of Poor Outcomes Up for Seniors With Delirium in Hospital

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who experience delirium during hospitalization are at elevated risk for death, eventual institutionalization, and dementia, according to a meta-analysis published in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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HIV Care Quality in VA Hospitals Generally High

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- National performance rates for quality-of-care measures for HIV patients receiving care through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) are generally high, though there is variation from facility to facility, according to a study in the July 26 Archives of Internal Medicine. Another study in the same issue suggests that some HIV drugs increase the risk of heart attack in HIV-infected patients.

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Iron Deficiency Anemia Affects Infants' Cognitive Function

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy appears to affect areas of cognitive function, and these effects seem to be stronger in infants with socioemotional deficits, according to research published online July 26 in Pediatrics.

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Maternal Affection in Infancy Predicts Distress in Adulthood

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of maternal affection during infancy are associated with lower levels of emotional distress in adulthood, according to a study published online July 26 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Orientation Can Start Med Students Off on Right Foot

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- A well-planned and -implemented orientation for medical students who are entering a new learning environment provides benefits for both the institution and the students, according to an article published online July 26 in Pediatrics.

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Younger Children Have Longer H1N1 Viral Shedding Period

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children under 13 years of age shed the 2009 H1N1 virus longer than other age groups, posing a higher risk for spreading the virus; yet, closing schools during a flu pandemic has limited effectiveness for isolating children, according to two studies published in the August issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Women's BP Measurements Higher When Taken by Doctors

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Female patients with normal blood pressure (BP) may have significantly higher systolic and diastolic readings when their BP is taken by a physician rather than a nurse or automated device, according to research published in the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Alteplase Remains Safe Up to 4.5 Hours After Acute Stroke

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Extending the treatment window for administration of alteplase from three hours to 4.5 hours in patients who experience an acute ischemic stroke is safe and does not result in delayed treatment of patients, according to a study published online July 27 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Cardiac Function Poor in Many Childhood Cancer Survivors

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Decreased cardiac function occurs in 27 percent of five-year childhood cancer survivors (CCSs), and higher cumulative anthracycline dose, radiation to the thorax, and younger age at diagnosis are all associated with left ventricular shortening fraction (LVSF) in these patients, according to a study in the July 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Some Epilepsy Drugs Linked to Self-Harm, Suicidal Behavior

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that are associated with a high risk of depression may have an elevated risk of self-harm or suicidal behavior, but other groups of AEDs do not appear to carry this risk, according to research published in the July 27 issue of Neurology.

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Many With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Get Aggressive Therapy

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer who have a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) threshold below 4.0 ng/mL undergo aggressive local therapy despite having low-risk disease, according to research published in the July 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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MODS Culture Method Beneficial in TB Diagnosis

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- The microscopic-observation drug-susceptibility (MODS) culture method, using duplicate gastric-aspirate specimens, may be the best diagnostic test for pulmonary tuberculosis in high-risk children in a resource-poor setting, according to research published online July 26 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Physician Advice Ups Dental Visits for Young Children

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Young children who receive a recommendation for dental care from their physician are more likely to receive dental care than children with physicians who do not address the issue, according to research published online July 26 in Pediatrics.

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Postconcussion Syndrome in Children Often Lasts Months

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial number of children who experience mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are still symptomatic for postconcussion syndrome (PCS) three months after injury, apparently independent of trauma, maternal psychological adjustment, or family dysfunction, according to research published online July 26 in Pediatrics.

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Depression May Compromise Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Symptoms of major depression in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are often missed during routine clinical interviews, and the presence of depression hinders treatment outcomes; in addition, HCV is associated with greater absence from work, lower productivity, and higher health care costs, according to two articles published in the August issue of Hepatology.

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FDA Panels Vote Against Plan to Reduce Opioid Abuse

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- On July 23, two U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panels voted against the FDA's plan for reducing abuse of long-acting and extended-release opioid drugs.

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Medical Device-Related Injuries High in Pediatric Population

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- In a recent two-year period, nearly 150,000 children visited an emergency department for treatment of medical device-associated adverse events (MDAEs), suggesting a need for more intensive efforts to prevent such injuries, according to research published online July 26 in Pediatrics.

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Back Pain Diagnostic Blocks Delay Pain Relief, Add Cost

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Performing one or more temporary diagnostic nerve blocks to establish arthritis as the cause of back pain before treatment with radiofrequency denervation results in unnecessary tests, delayed pain relief, and added cost, according to a study in the August issue of Anesthesiology.

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Seat Belts Protect Pregnant Drivers During Collisions

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Wearing a seat belt protects pregnant drivers by reducing the risk of abdominal pressure or contact with the steering wheel during frontal and rear collisions, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Malicious Use of Drugs Affects Dozens of Children Annually

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- About 160 young children are victims of deliberate, malicious exposure to drugs and alcohol each year in the United States, according to research published online July 21 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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Pelvic Radiation in Girls Tied to Higher Stillbirth Risk

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Female survivors of childhood cancer treated with pelvic radiation have a much higher risk of stillbirth and neonatal death in their offspring than do females who did not get radiation, but there is no increased risk for male survivors who received gonadal radiation, according to research published online July 23 in the The Lancet.

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Automated Phone Outreach Doesn't Improve Testing Rates

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Automated telephone outreach with speech recognition (ATO-SR) does not improve rates of diabetes-related testing compared with usual care, according to research published in the July issue of Diabetes Care.

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New Standardized Method Determines Causes of Stillbirth

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new standardized method may help assign cause of death in stillbirth based on data collected during prenatal care and assessment of fetal death, according to a study published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Modest Weight Loss Linked to Urinary Incontinence Benefits

FRIDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight and obese women, modest weight loss can result in significant urinary incontinence benefits, according to a study in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Folate-Related Genes Plus Lifestyle Tied to Heart Defects

THURSDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms in folate-related genes as well as lifestyle factors that may alter folate metabolism appear to be at increased risk of having a fetus with a congenital heart defect (CHD), according to a study published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Phone Intervention Helps Heart Failure Patients Long Term

THURSDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- A telephone intervention aimed at improving education and compliance in heart failure patients can lead to fewer heart failure hospitalizations and a lower death rate than no intervention up to three years after the program ends, according to a study in the July 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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ACOG: Cervical Cytology Not Recommended for Adolescents

THURSDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although prior recommendations of major societies advised cervical cytology screening in adolescents based on onset of vaginal intercourse, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists now recommends that screening begin at age 21, regardless of sexual activity, due to the rarity of cervical cancer in women under 21. These recommendations have been published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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When LDL After Statin is Very Low, HDL Not a Risk Factor

THURSDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels are associated with increased cardiovascular risk in patients untreated by statins, but in treated patients who achieve very low low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, HDL level is no longer associated with level of risk, according to research published online July 22 in The Lancet.

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FDA Places Partial Clinical Hold on Avandia Trial

THURSDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has informed GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), the manufacturer of rosiglitazone (Avandia), that the Thiazolidinedione Intervention With Vitamin D Evaluation (TIDE) trial has been placed on partial clinical hold, one week after an FDA advisory panel recommended that the diabetes drug remain on the market with tightened controls or restricted sales due to cardiovascular safety concerns.

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Miscarriage, Preterm Birth Not Tied to Modest Caffeine Intake

THURSDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate caffeine intake -- defined as less than 200 mg of caffeine, which equates to about 12 ounces of coffee -- does not appear to be linked to miscarriage or preterm birth, according to a new committee opinion published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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ACOG Guidelines Call for More Vaginal Births After Cesarean

THURSDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is a safe option for most women who have had one prior cesarean delivery and for some who have had two prior cesarean deliveries, according to new guidelines released by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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HPV Vaccine Demonstrates Sustained Protection

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine appears to provide strong and sustained protection against low-grade lesions attributable to HPV, according to research published July 20 in BMJ.

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Method Estimates Complexity of Ambulatory Encounters

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- A method of estimating the relative complexity of ambulatory clinical encounters could be useful in making comparisons between specialties, and the Guided Care approach may provide benefits for primary care physicians who work with chronically ill older patients, according to two studies published in the July/August Annals of Family Medicine.

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Birth Timing Not Tied to Low Birth Weight Infants' Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Timing of birth in very low birth weight infants appears to have very little effect on the incidence of morbidity and mortality, according to a study published online July 19 in Pediatrics.

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Regular High-Heel Use Linked to Lower Leg Differences

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Wearing high-heeled shoes over the long term leads to shortening of muscle fascicles in the calf as well as increased stiffness of Achilles' tendons, according to research published online July 16 in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

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Prenatal Anxiety in Moms Tied to Higher Infant Illness Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Babies whose mothers experience prenatal stress and anxiety appear to be at higher risk for illnesses and require more antibiotics in their first year of life, according to research published online July 19 in Pediatrics.

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Automated Audio Method Can Help ID Children With Autism

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- A method of conducting day-long audio recordings, and processing them with automated analysis, can predict children's ages and identify those with language delay or autism, according to research published online July 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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PCB Exposure May Raise Risk for Hypertension

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) appears to be associated with rates of hypertension, and may have an effect on blood pressure control, according to research published online July 16 in the Journal of Hypertension.

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Overweight, Obese Mothers at Higher Risk for Preterm Birth

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese women appear to be at greater risk of delivering preterm babies, and, after publication bias is taken into account, maternal overweight and obesity do not have beneficial effects on low infant birth weight, according to research published July 20 in BMJ.

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Melanoma Excision Depth Varies by Physician Specialty

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma specialists who are not dermatologists tend to excise thin invasive melanomas to a deeper level than do dermatologist specialists and non-specialists, according to research published online July 19 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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CHD Risk Factors Common in Young Men and Women

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) are common among young adults, but they don't seem to alter rates of screening for high cholesterol, according to research published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Intervention Ups Vaccination Rate in Health Care Workers

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- An educational intervention program can increase low influenza vaccination rates in primary health care workers, according to research published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Physicians May Ignore Patients' Contextual Red Flags

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians often ignore contextual red flags presented during patient encounters, which may ultimately lead to medical errors, according to research published in the July 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Electronic Health Records Boost Medical Office Efficiency

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- The implementation of electronic health records (EHRs) can improve medical office efficiency and time management without impairing patients' strong sense of trust in the physician-patient relationship, according to a study in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Study Looks at Pediatric Pneumonia Complication Rates

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of systemic complications associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) fell only in children under the age of 1 following the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in 2000, but local complications related to CAP have increased among all pediatric age groups, according to research published online July 19 in Pediatrics.

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5.2 Percent of Residency Applicant Essays Plagiarized

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- About 5 percent of the application essays to residency programs -- often referred to as the personal statement -- contain plagiarized material, according to research published in the July 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Painters Found to Have Increased Bladder Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Occupational exposures in painters are associated with an elevated risk for bladder cancer, a risk that increases with years on the job, according to research published in the August issue of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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CRC Screening Disparities Persist for Seniors on Medicare

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Despite expanding coverage for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in the Medicare population, disparities persist based on differences in usual place of health care, education level, and insurance coverage type, according to research published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Cochlear Implantation Odds Not Lower With Medicaid

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children with Medicaid coverage have the same odds of receiving an initial cochlear implant as those with private insurance, but are less likely to receive a sequential bilateral implant, and they have higher complication rates and worse follow-up compliance, according to research published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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More Homeless Finish Advance Directives With Intervention

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Counselor-assisted end-of-life planning for homeless people significantly increases the rate of completion of advance directives in this population, according to research published in the July issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Melanoma Rate for Black Women, Hispanic Men Higher in Fla.

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic males and non-Hispanic black females residing in Florida have substantially higher incidence rates of melanoma than those same subgroups residing in the United States as a whole, according to research published in the July issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Long-Term Mobile Phone Use May Raise Tinnitus Risk

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who have used a mobile phone for at least four years appear to be at increased risk for tinnitus, according to research published online June 23 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Zinc Nasal Gel May Lead to Loss of Sense of Smell

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Use of over-the-counter homeopathic nasal zinc gluconate gel may result in loss of the sense of smell, according to a report in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Post-Traumatic Epilepsy Can Occur Years After Brain Injury

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Some soldiers who suffered penetrating head injuries (PHIs) in the Vietnam War developed post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) more than 14 years after receiving their injuries, and the location, size, and type of lesion all predict PTE, according to the latest phase of the decades-long Vietnam Head Injury Study (VHIS) reported in the July 20 issue of Neurology.

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BMI at Age 18 Found to Predict Psoriatic Arthritis Risk

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Psoriasis patients with a higher body mass index (BMI) at age 18 have an increased risk of developing psoriatic arthritis (PsA) than those with a lower BMI at that age, according to research published in the July issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Study Notes Eating Issues in Children With ASD

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) appear to have feeding-related issues starting in infancy, and eat a less-varied diet starting at a young age, although their growth and energy intake are not impaired compared with children without ASD, according to research published online July 19 in Pediatrics.

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In Vitro Fertilization Linked to Children's Cancer Risk

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Children conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) may have a moderately increased risk of cancer, according to research published online July 19 in Pediatrics.

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Depression Linked to Erectile Dysfunction May Raise CV Risk

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Depressive symptoms in men with erectile dysfunction (ED) constitute an independent risk factor for the incidence of a major cardiovascular event (MACE), according to a study published online July 13 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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FDA Warns Public Regarding Stolen Advair Diskus Inhalers

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning to consumers, pharmacists, and wholesalers that certain lots of Advair Diskus (fluticasone propionate and salmeterol inhalation powder) inhalers were stolen from a GlaxoSmithKline distribution warehouse near Richmond, Virginia, in August 2009 and have recently been found in some pharmacies.

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Stress in Pregnancy May Contribute to Preterm Birth

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience severe life events stress during the first or second trimester of pregnancy may be at increased risk for delivering preterm babies and infants with low birth weight, according to research published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Admissions for Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse Rising

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Substance abuse admissions involving prescription pain reliever abuse increased from 2.2 to 9.8 percent between 1998 and 2008 in those aged 12 and older, according to a recent study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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High Acupuncture Expectations Not Linked to Outcomes

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic low back pain, having a positive predisposition toward acupuncture doesn't predict better outcomes, according to research published in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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Quality of Internet Info on Sports Med Diagnoses Variable

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- The quality of content and financial transparency of Internet health information related to orthopedic sports medicine diagnoses is highly variable, but Web sites displaying the HONcode seal are significantly more likely to score higher in both of these areas, according to research published in the July 7 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Pain and Depression Dim Work Expectations After Whiplash

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Among people who suffer whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) resulting from a car accident, those in the most pain and those with depression symptoms appear to have the lowest expectations of returning to work, according to a study in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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Children's Mental Health Affected by 9/11 Attack

FRIDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Preschool children exposed to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City were found to be at increased risk of having behavioral and psychological problems if their mothers suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, according to a study in the July/August issue of Child Development. According to a related study in the same journal, direct exposure to the attacks was also associated with depression and PTSD in adolescents and their mothers.

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Stroke Risk Doubled One Hour After Drinking Alcohol

THURSDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of stroke is more than doubled in the hour after ingestion of alcohol, according to the results of a study published online July 15 in Stroke.

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Many Toddlers Watch at Least Two Hours of Television Daily

THURSDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- In 2001, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended that children's television viewing be limited to no more than two hours of "quality programming" daily, but about one-fifth of Oregon's 2-year-olds watch two hours or more on a typical day, according to research published in the July 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Repor

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