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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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July 2010 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: August 02, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for July 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Specialties See Modest Compensation Increases in '09

FRIDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Most medical specialties saw modest compensation increases in 2009, but many provider organizations are still operating at a substantial loss, according to the findings of the American Medical Group Association's (AMGA) 2010 Medical Group Compensation and Financial Survey.

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Cuvposa Approved for Chronic Drooling in Children

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Cuvposa (glycopyrrolate) Oral Solution has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat chronic drooling in children aged 3 to 16.

FDA

Differences in Brain Structure Seen in Females With IBS

THURSDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Females with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have structural gray matter brain alterations in areas involved in evaluative and cognitive functions, according to research published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Sleep Problem May Precede Brain Disorders by Decades

WEDNESDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and dementia with Lewy bodies may have preclinical periods lasting for decades in some cases, with the initial manifestation being idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), according to research published online July 28 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Risk of Poor Outcomes Up for Seniors With Delirium in Hospital

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who experience delirium during hospitalization are at elevated risk for death, eventual institutionalization, and dementia, according to a meta-analysis published in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Iron Deficiency Anemia Affects Infants' Cognitive Function

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy appears to affect areas of cognitive function, and these effects seem to be stronger in infants with socioemotional deficits, according to research published online July 26 in Pediatrics.

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Alteplase Remains Safe Up to 4.5 Hours After Acute Stroke

TUESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Extending the treatment window for administration of alteplase from three hours to 4.5 hours in patients who experience an acute ischemic stroke is safe and does not result in delayed treatment of patients, according to a study published online July 27 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Some Epilepsy Drugs Linked to Self-Harm, Suicidal Behavior

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that are associated with a high risk of depression may have an elevated risk of self-harm or suicidal behavior, but other groups of AEDs do not appear to carry this risk, according to research published in the July 27 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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EEG Protocol Results Found Similar in Epilepsy Diagnosis

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- For diagnosing epilepsy in children with new-onset seizures, early electroencephalography (EEG) or later sleep-deprived EEG (SD-EEG) provide similar results and diagnostic utility, according to a study published online July 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Postconcussion Syndrome in Children Often Lasts Months

MONDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial number of children who experience mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are still symptomatic for postconcussion syndrome (PCS) three months after injury, apparently independent of trauma, maternal psychological adjustment, or family dysfunction, according to research published online July 26 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Automated Audio Method Can Help ID Children With Autism

WEDNESDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- A method of conducting day-long audio recordings, and processing them with automated analysis, can predict children's ages and identify those with language delay or autism, according to research published online July 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
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5.2 Percent of Residency Applicant Essays Plagiarized

TUESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- About 5 percent of the application essays to residency programs -- often referred to as the personal statement -- contain plagiarized material, according to research published in the July 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Post-Traumatic Epilepsy Can Occur Years After Brain Injury

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Some soldiers who suffered penetrating head injuries (PHIs) in the Vietnam War developed post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) more than 14 years after receiving their injuries, and the location, size, and type of lesion all predict PTE, according to the latest phase of the decades-long Vietnam Head Injury Study (VHIS) reported in the July 20 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Study Notes Eating Issues in Children With ASD

MONDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) appear to have feeding-related issues starting in infancy, and eat a less-varied diet starting at a young age, although their growth and energy intake are not impaired compared with children without ASD, according to research published online July 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Stroke Risk Doubled One Hour After Drinking Alcohol

THURSDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of stroke is more than doubled in the hour after ingestion of alcohol, according to the results of a study published online July 15 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Alzheimer's Patients Have Diminished Emotional Response

THURSDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- People with Alzheimer's disease appear to experience emotions less intensely than those without the disease, according to a study of a small group of Alzheimer's disease patients published in the Spring issue of the Journal of Neuropsychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences.

Abstract
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BMI Linked to Poorer Cognitive Function in Older Women

THURSDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among postmenopausal women, higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with poorer cognitive function in those with a smaller waist-to-hip ratio, according to research published online July 14 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
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Blister Packs of Coumadin Recalled

THURSDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Bristol-Myers Squibb has initiated a voluntary recall of physician sample blister packs and hospital unit dose (HUD) blister packs of Coumadin, a medication used to treat or prevent blood clots.

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Self-Hypnosis, Video Training Help Tourette Patients

WEDNESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- In children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome, adding videotape training to self-hypnosis instruction is associated with improvements in tic control after very few sessions, according to a case series reported in the July/August issue of the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics.

Abstract
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High Vitamin D Levels Tied to Lower Parkinson's Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- People with higher serum levels of vitamin D are at reduced risk for developing Parkinson's disease compared to those with lower serum levels of the vitamin, according to a study in the July issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Vitamins E, D Linked to Cognitive Benefits in Later Life

TUESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intake of vitamin E appears to lower risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, while older individuals with low vitamin D levels appear more likely to experience cognitive decline, according to two studies published in the July Archives of Neurology and the July 12 Archives of Internal Medicine, respectively.

Abstract - Devore
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Abstract - Llewellyn
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Review Calls for Evidence-Based Approach to Phenylketonuria

TUESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- While there is agreement that early dietary management of phenylketonuria (PKU) is essential for optimal cognitive development, there is little consensus on the aims of management of the disease after childhood or in use of new therapies, according to a review published online July 12 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Larger Head Size Tied to Less Decline in Alzheimer's Patients

MONDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Greater head circumference appears to be protective against cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the July 13 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Superior for Stroke Diagnosis

MONDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is accurate and appears to be more useful than noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing acute ischemic stroke within 12 hours after symptoms appear; however, there is not enough evidence to support or refute the efficacy of perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) in diagnosing acute ischemic stroke, according to an analysis published in the July 13 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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FDA: Off-Label Use of Malaria Drug Tied to Serious Effects

FRIDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- In response to continued reports of serious side effects in patients using quinine sulfate (Qualaquin) off-label for the treatment or prevention of nocturnal leg cramps, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) to educate practitioners and patients about the potential for serious side effects associated with such unapproved uses.

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Blood Protein Reflects Severity and Progression in Alzheimer's

THURSDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated plasma concentration of clusterin is associated with Alzheimer's disease pathology, severity, and rate of clinical progression, according to research published in the July issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Pre-Diabetes Symptoms Not Linked to Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- In older people with no history of diabetes, insulin resistance and elevated fasting glucose levels have no association with impaired cognitive function, according to research published in the July issue of Diabetes.

Abstract
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Many Doctors in Specialties Other Than Their Early Choices

WEDNESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Ten years after graduation, approximately one-fourth of doctors work in a specialty other than the one they chose in their third year post-graduation, according to research published online July 6 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial

Children With Migraine Do Not Have More Psychiatric Problems

WEDNESDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Children with migraine do not, as previously thought, have more psychiatric and social problems than healthy children, according to a review article published online July 5 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Depression Linked to Higher Risk of Alzheimer's, Dementia

TUESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is associated with a higher risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in older people over long-term follow-up, according to research published in the July 6 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease Rate Lowest Since '01

FRIDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- There were 386 cases of West Nile virus (WNV) neuroinvasive disease reported in the United States in 2009, for an incidence of 0.13 cases per 100,000 population, the lowest incidence since 2001, according to a report published in the July 2 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Early Stroke Complications Rob Patients of Healthy Years

THURSDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Early complications following ischemic stroke cost patients about two years' worth of optimal health, in addition to the loss of optimal health due to the stroke itself, and a higher number of complications is linked to a larger loss of healthy life-years, according to research published online July 1 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Report Addresses Physician Financial Conflicts in Care

THURSDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) urges U.S. teaching hospitals to establish policies that ensure financial relationships between physicians and industry do not result in conflicts of interest that influence patient care.

Press Release
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In Women, Early Life Activity Cuts Cognitive Impairment Risk

THURSDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have been physically active at any point in their lives -- but especially during the teenage years -- are at lower risk of developing cognitive impairment in late life than women who have been inactive, according to research published online June 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
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