Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Moderate Drinking Linked to Lower Mortality Risk in Seniors

Last Updated: August 25, 2010.

 

Moderate drinkers found to have lower mortality risk than abstainers and heavy drinkers

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
In older adults, moderate drinking is associated with lower mortality risk than abstention, heavy drinking, and perhaps even light drinking, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, moderate drinking is associated with lower mortality risk than abstention, heavy drinking, and perhaps even light drinking, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

Charles J. Holahan, Ph.D., of the University of Texas at Austin, and colleagues followed 1,824 current or former drinkers (1,142 men and 682 women), aged 55 to 65 years, for 20 years. The researchers surveyed the groups to determine demographics, daily alcohol consumption, former problem-drinking status, health, and social/behavioral factors. Deaths in the cohort were determined through death certificates.

Controlling for gender and age, the researchers estimated that, compared to moderate drinkers, abstainers had more than double the mortality risk, while heavy drinkers and light drinkers had 70 and 23 percent increased mortality risk, respectively. Using a model that also included former problem drinking status, health problems, sociodemographics, and social/behavioral factors, abstainers and heavy drinkers still showed higher mortality risks -- of 51 and 45 percent, respectively -- compared to moderate drinkers. The increased mortality risk for light drinkers was not considered significant.

"Current abstainers in this sample included many former problem drinkers, individuals with more health problems, and individuals characterized by both sociodemographic and social/behavioral factors associated with higher mortality. However, even after taking account of all of these traditional and nontraditional covariates, moderate alcohol consumption continued to show a significant, though attenuated, association with lower mortality risk," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: World Cancer Congress, Aug. 18-21, 2010 Next: ACOG Recommends Antibiotics Before Cesarean Delivery

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.