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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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August 2010 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: September 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for August 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Neonatal Mortality Risk Higher at Unspecialized Hospitals

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Very low-birth-weight (VLBW) and very preterm (VPT) infants born at hospitals without specialized neonatal care have higher mortality risks than those born at specialized level III hospitals, according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Gestation Linked to Cerebral Palsy Risk Even in Term Births

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- An increased risk of cerebral palsy is seen in individuals who were delivered at 37 or 38 weeks of gestation or at 42 weeks or later, compared to 40 weeks, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Non-Physiologic Factors Sway Growth Hormone Decisions

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' decisions to initiate growth hormone (GH) therapy in children with idiopathic short stature are mostly consistent with established guidelines, but their recommendations regarding GH continuation are more strongly influenced by contextual and attitudinal factors than by growth response to therapy, according to research published online Aug. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Pediatricians Can Often Manage Gynecologic Issues

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Among pediatric patients, most medical gynecologic issues can be managed in the primary care office setting, usually without a pelvic examination; although, when a pelvic exam is required, the primary care office may be the best setting, according to a clinical report published online Aug. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Screening Guidelines Offered for Urinary Tract Conditions

MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The American Urological Association (AUA) has published new guidelines for the screening of siblings and offspring of index patients with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and infants with prenatal hydronephrosis (PNH) in the September issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Pediatricians, Parents Urged to Address Sexuality in the Media

MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians and parents have the opportunity to help address unhealthy messages related to sexuality that young people receive from the media, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics published online Aug. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Recommendations Updated

MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics' Committee on Infectious Diseases has updated its recommendations on the routine use of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine as well as antiviral medications for the prevention and treatment of influenza among children; the recommendations are part of a policy statement published online Aug. 30 in Pediatrics.

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Sports-Related Concussions Often Occur in Younger Kids

MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children ages 8 to 13 account for a considerable portion of sports-related concussions (SRCs) that occur among young people, according to research published online Aug. 30 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Bakhos
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Accompanying Clinical Report

Vaccination Coverage Estimate Shrinks With New Method

FRIDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- As the result of a recent change to the method for measuring Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) vaccination coverage, the proportion of children aged 19 to 35 months considered fully vaccinated has dropped by nearly a third, according to an article published in the Aug. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Youth Tobacco Use Down Since 2000; No Drop Since 2006

FRIDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The use of cigarettes and tobacco products by youths has declined substantially over the past decade -- though not from 2006 to 2009 -- but nearly one in four high school students still used tobacco products in 2009, according to a report in the Aug. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC's Revised Influenza Death Estimates Show Wide Variation

FRIDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- From 1976 through 2007, the number of annual influenza-related deaths in the United States ranged from 3,349 to 48,614, according to a report published in the Aug. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Alleles Tied to BMI in Children

THURSDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In children who were born large for gestational age, certain type 2 diabetes susceptibility alleles are linked to low body mass index (BMI) at age 8, according to research published in the August issue of Diabetes.

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Parents of Children With Autism More Likely to Divorce

THURSDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to divorce than parents of children who do not have the disorder, and the risk of divorce stays high as the child advances through childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood, according to research published in the August issue of the Journal of Family Psychology.

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Underinsured Children More Prevalent Than Uninsured

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, there are more underinsured children than uninsured children, and both groups have suboptimal health care quality and access, according to research published in the Aug. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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ACOG Makes Recommendations for Use of HPV Vaccination

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Girls should be routinely vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) at the age of 11 or 12, though vaccination may be advisable in girls as young as 9, according to recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Most Low Weight Infants at 24 Weeks Gestational Age Live

TUESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of low birth weight infants with a gestational age (GA) of 24 or more weeks survive, but this population continues to have high rates of morbidity, according to a report published online Aug. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Rotavirus Vaccine Effective in Preventing Hospitalizations

TUESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- High three-dose coverage with a universal infant pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) is effective in preventing rotavirus and non-rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (AGE) hospitalizations in vaccinated children and older individuals who are unvaccinated, according to a study published online Aug. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Adult Victims of Violence More Likely to Spank Children

MONDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Corporal punishment (CP) is still a prevalent form of child discipline in the United States, and it appears to be meted out more often by adult victims of intimate partner aggression or violence (IPAV), according to research published online Aug. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Thousands of Children Treated for Sledding Injuries Yearly

MONDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- From 1997 to 2007, an average of more than 20,000 children and adolescents per year were treated in U.S. emergency departments for sledding-related injuries, according to research published online Aug. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Surgery for Undescended Testes Often Occurs After Age 2

MONDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical guidelines recommend orchidopexy by age 1 for treatment of congenital undescended testes, but a substantial number of boys do not undergo the surgery even by age 2, according to research published online Aug. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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More HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants Have Group B Strep

MONDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants may be more susceptible to invasive group B streptococcal (GBS) infections in terms of incidence and severity than babies born to HIV-uninfected mothers, according to research published online Aug. 23 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Tobacco Depictions in Popular Movies Down Since 2005

MONDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The number of onscreen smoking incidents depicted in top-grossing U.S. movies has decreased substantially since 2005, though nearly half still contain tobacco imagery, according to research published in the Aug. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Thousands of Heat Illnesses Occur in Teen Athletes Yearly

FRIDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- On average, high school athletes in the United States have an estimated 9,237 time-loss heat illnesses annually, and the highest rate is among football players, according to a report in the Aug. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Recommended Vaccinations Up Among U.S. Teens

FRIDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination rates in U.S. adolescents for the vaccines recommended by the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices have increased since 2008, but there is still room for improvement, according to research published in the Aug. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Immediate In-Brace Correction Influences Scoliosis Outcomes

FRIDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Prior analyses of the effect of bracing on long-term outcomes for correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis identified immediate in-brace correction as influential; a new study confirming these analyses and giving insight into the biomechanics of bracing has been published in the Aug. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Pesticide Exposure in Womb May Derail Attention Later

THURSDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- It remains to be determined what impact paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genotypes have on the influence of in utero organophosphate exposure on subsequent childhood mental and motor development, but such exposure does appear to affect attention levels in children, according to two studies published online Aug. 19 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract - Eskenazi
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Urinary Incontinence Common in Women, Men, Children

THURSDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Urinary incontinence (UI) is common -- more so in women than in men -- but exact prevalence is difficult to pinpoint due to variables in study methodology, definitions of UI, and populations studied, according to research published in the August issue of Urology.

Abstract
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Lifestyle Choices Affect Headache Frequency in Teens

THURSDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Low physical activity, smoking, and being overweight all significantly increase the odds of recurrent headache in adolescents, according to research published online Aug. 18 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Genetic Link With Advanced Fatty Liver Disease Confirmed

THURSDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Carriers of an allele of the PNPLA3 gene who have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may be at increased risk for advanced disease; the allele is also associated with earlier presentation in pediatric patients, according to two studies published online May 14, ahead of the print issue of Hepatology.

Abstract - Speliotes
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Abstract - Rotman
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Steroid Doses in Tonsillectomy Compared for Bleeding Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Giving the steroid dexamethasone to children undergoing tonsillectomy is not associated with a dose-dependent increased risk of postoperative hemorrhage, according to a review in the August issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Prevalence of Hearing Loss Up in U.S. Adolescents

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of hearing loss in U.S. adolescents rose significantly between 1988 to 1994 and 2005 to 2006, and adolescents from impoverished households appear to be at higher risk of hearing loss, according to research published in the Aug. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Lactobacillus Reuteri Is Safe, Effective for Colicky Infants

MONDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri) appears to be a safe and effective treatment for infantile colic in breast-fed infants, and gut microbiota changes induced by this probiotic may play a role in symptom improvements, according to research published online Aug. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Racial Disparities Seen in Obesity Prevalence in Children

MONDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Among children in California, the prevalence of high body mass index (BMI) has declined among some groups, but ethnic/racial disparities exist, according to research published online Aug. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Fish, Fatty Acid Intake Tied to Lower Depression Risk in Boys

MONDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of fish and fatty acid consumption may protect against adolescent depression in boys but not in girls, according to research published online Aug. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Shoulder Height Markings Aid in Car Seat Decisions

MONDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Shoulder height markings on restraints significantly increase the odds of parents selecting an appropriately-sized child's car seat, according to research published online Aug. 16 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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FDA: Aseptic Meningitis Risk Related to Lamictal Use

FRIDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a drug safety communication to warn that the seizure and bipolar disorder medication Lamictal (lamotrigine) can cause aseptic meningitis. The FDA is revising the Warnings and Precautions section of the drug label as well as the patient Medication Guide to include this information.

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CDC: Expand Food Fortification to Prevent Birth Defects

FRIDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- New opportunities for folic acid fortification in foods may be highly effective in preventing neural tube defects (NTDs), as food fortification makes folic acid accessible to women of childbearing age in a safe, cost-effective manner, according to a report published in the Aug. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Cell Phones Offer New Tool in Infectious Disease Surveillance

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A survey invitation sent to hundreds of thousands of cell phone subscribers in Mexico during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic demonstrates a new model for enlisting new technology for surveillance during outbreaks of infectious disease, according to a letter published in the September issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Most Useful Marfan Syndrome Diagnostic Criteria Identified

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- While features of Marfan syndrome can be found in the general population, clinicians should be alert for craniofacial, thumb and wrist, and other indicators that are highly specific to the condition, according to a study in the Aug. 4 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Disparities Exist for Ear Infections Among Children

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Disparities exist across racial/ethnic and socioeconomic groups in the prevalence of childhood frequent ear infections, with white children and those living below the poverty line more likely to report such infections, according to research published in the August issue of Laryngoscope.

Abstract
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Specialist Retrieval Teams May Increase Pediatric Survival

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The use of specialist retrieval teams to move children from one hospital to another with a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) may result in reduced mortality for those children, according to research published online Aug. 12 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Bone Marrow Transplant May Treat Blistering Disease

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation may help children with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa by increasing the deposition of type VII collagen (C7), the lack of which characterizes the disease, according to research published in the Aug. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Earlier Weaning of Preterm Infants From Incubator Is Safe

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Transitioning moderately preterm infants from incubators to open cribs when the infants weigh as little as 1,600 g is safe and associated with earlier hospital discharge, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Research Confirms Violence Linked to Shaking Infants

TUESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Cases of infants referred for abusive head trauma (AHT) are usually, if not always, associated with extremely violent shaking, and shaking is repeated in more than half of cases, according to research published online Aug. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Upgraded Child Restraint Law Cuts Traffic Injury Rate

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- After the implementation of a 2005 New York State law requiring 4- to 6-year-old children to use a booster seat or restraint system, traffic injuries in the age group fell by 18 percent, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Tongue Piercing Linked to Orthodontic Issue

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A pierced tongue has the potential to lead to a midline diastema in patients with previously well-aligned teeth, according to a case report published in the July issue of the Journal of Clinical Orthodontics.

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Girls Reaching Puberty Earlier Than 10 to 30 Years Ago

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of girls who experience breast development at ages 7 and 8 years is greater in girls today than in those born 10 to 30 years earlier, particularly among white females; and, maternal prenatal characteristics as well as weight and body mass index (BMI) gain during infancy influence various puberty outcomes, according to research published online Aug. 9 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Biro
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Abstract - Maisonet
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Dry Pet Food May Be Contaminated With Salmonella

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Household use of dry dog and cat food manufactured at a specific plant has been linked to illness among young children over a three-year period, demonstrating for the first time that dry pet food may be associated with Salmonella infection in humans, according to research published online Aug. 9 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Strep Accounts for 37 Percent of Pharyngitis in Children

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Group A Streptococcus (GAS) accounts for 37 percent of pediatric pharyngitis cases, though prevalence varies by age, and clinical scoring systems could reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing for non-GAS pharyngitis in low-resource settings, according to research published online Aug. 9 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Shaikh
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Abstract - Joachim
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Fractures Comprise Sizable Portion of HS Sports Injuries

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Fractures are a common type of injury among high school athletes, with potentially serious repercussions for the students and their families, according to research published in the July issue of the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine.

Abstract
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Diabetes May Alter Obese Adolescents' Brain Structure

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Obese adolescents with type 2 diabetes have decreased cognitive functioning and subtle brain abnormalities compared to obese adolescents without diabetes, according to research published online July 29 in Diabetologia.

Abstract
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Large Pregnancy Weight Gain Linked to Heavier Newborns

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Women who put on excessive weight during pregnancy are more likely to give birth to heavier babies regardless of genetic factors, according to research published online Aug. 5 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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TNFα Blockers May Raise Risk of Malignancies in Children

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Children taking tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) blockers may be at increased risk for developing malignancies, but confounding factors make it difficult to establish a causal relationship, according to research published in the August issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Supportive Intervention May Help Maltreated Foster Children

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in a mentoring and skills group program may have a positive impact on the mental health and quality of life of maltreated children placed in foster care, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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ER Intervention Addresses Aggression, Alcohol in Teens

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Among adolescents seen in the emergency department and reporting recent alcohol use and aggression, a brief intervention may reduce both aggression and alcohol consequences, according to research published in the Aug. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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FDA: NeoProfen Recalled Due to Visible Particulate Matter

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted health care professionals of a voluntary recall of two lots of Lundbeck Inc.'s ibuprofen lysine (NeoProfen) injection, as the product did not meet a visible particulate quality requirement.

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Parental Psychiatric Illness Ups Risk in Offspring

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Having one parent with a history of a mental health disorder is associated with an increased risk of a range of mental health disorders, and offspring have an even stronger risk if both parents have a mental health disorder, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Fruit-Flavored Rehydration Solutions Preferred by Children

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Children appear to have a preference for fruit-flavored, sucralose-sweetened oral rehydration solutions over rice-based solutions, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Environmental Traits, Mom's Obesity Tied to Type 1 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Consistent with the hygiene and overload hypotheses, environmental factors associated with less antigenic exposure in early life and maternal obesity may be associated with risk for type 1 diabetes, according to a study published in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Industry-Funded Clinical Trials Yield More Positive Outcomes

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Drug clinical trials supported by industry are more likely to produce favorable results than trials supported by government or nonprofit/nonfederal organizations, and they are less likely to be published within two years of the study being completed, according to research published in the Aug. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Diet Appears to Influence Gut Bacteria Types

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Gut bacteria may be different in children who eat a high-fiber, vegetation-based diet than in those who consume a typically Western, high-fat, high-sugar, low-fiber diet, and the bacteria may play a role in vulnerability to obesity and allergies, according to research published online Aug. 2 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Deodorant Sprays Can Damage Skin When Used Incorrectly

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Deodorant sprays can cause skin-damaging cold burns if improperly applied, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Pathological Internet Use Linked to Teen Depression

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Pathological Internet use among adolescents who are initially free of mental health problems may be linked to later depression, according to research published online Aug. 2 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Specific Behaviors in NICU Grads Predictive of Autism

MONDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Neurobehavioral testing during infancy in babies who are neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) graduates reveals specific abnormalities in those who are later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to research published online Aug. 2 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Pediatric Injuries From Household Products Declining

MONDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The number of annual household cleaning product-related injuries in children treated in U.S. emergency departments decreased nearly 50 percent between 1990 and 2006, though the overall number of injuries remains high, according to research published online Aug. 2 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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FDA Issues Label Change for Afluria Influenza Vaccine

MONDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has updated the Warnings and Precautions sections of the Prescribing Information for the influenza virus vaccine Afluria, as the vaccine has been associated with an increased incidence of fever and febrile seizure in children younger than 5 years of age in Australia.

Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System
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Most Pediatricians, Family Doctors Offering HPV Vaccine

MONDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all pediatricians and most family physicians were offering human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine by 18 months after licensure, though fewer strongly recommend the vaccine for 11- and 12-year-olds than for 13- to 15-year-olds, according to research published online Aug. 2 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Peers May Strongly Influence Breast-Feeding Duration

MONDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Attendance at groups for first-time parents where peers breast-feed infants of a similar age appears to strongly influence whether mothers continue breast-feeding to six months, according to research published online Aug. 2 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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