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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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September 2010 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: October 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for September 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

DNA Findings in Children With ADHD Suggest Genetic Cause

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appear to have an increased rate of large, rare chromosomal deletions and duplications, known as copy number variants (CNVs), that have been implicated previously in autism and schizophrenia, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in The Lancet.

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Blacks With Prostate Cancer Have Better Well-Being

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- African-American men recently diagnosed with prostate cancer may have better emotional well-being than white men with prostate cancer, despite similar physical functioning, according to research published in the September issue of Urology.

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Smoking With Preeclampsia Ups Risk of Adverse Outcomes

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Though smoking decreases the risk of preeclampsia, women with preeclampsia who smoke may be at much higher risk for adverse outcomes in pregnancy, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Stress, Other Life Factors May Lead to Missed Birth Control Pills

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Women who lead stressful and busy lives are more likely to have poor oral contraceptive adherence; clinicians may want to consider a patients' daily contextual factors when discussing contraceptive options, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Watchful Waiting Shows Cost Advantage in Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Watchful waiting with active surveillance (WWAS) may steeply reduce costs compared to radical prostatectomy in men with low-risk prostate cancer, according to research published in the September issue of Urology.

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Provider Perceptions Influence IUD Recommendations

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A provider's decision on whether to recommend intrauterine contraception (IUC) may be influenced by a patient's race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES), according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Comorbidities at Prostatectomy Tied to Other Causes of Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Men undergoing radical prostatectomy who have greater comorbidity after surgery also have a higher risk of death from other causes than prostate cancer, so assessing patients' other conditions may be advisable when considering treatment, according to research published in the September issue of Urology.

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In Breast Cancer, Early Fertility Preservation Referral Better

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Referring young, newly diagnosed breast cancer patients to a reproductive specialist before surgery may speed up fertility preservation (FP) procedures and allow time for two cycles of ovarian stimulation (OS) between surgery and initiation of chemotherapy, according to research published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Tanezumab Is Effective Osteoarthritis Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Tanezumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds and inhibits nerve growth factor, appears to relieve joint pain enough to improve function in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, according to research published online Sept. 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Dexamethasone Therapy Improves Meningitis Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Therapy with dexamethasone has been widely implemented in the Netherlands as an adjunctive treatment of pneumococcal meningitis, and there subsequently has been substantial improvement in the prognosis of the disease on a national level, according to research published online Sept. 29 in Neurology.

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FDA, CSPS Issue Warning on Infant Sleep Positioners

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Use of infant sleep positioners could result in death, state the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CSPS) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in a warning released Sept. 29.

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In Endometrial Cancer, Uterus-Sparing Approach Effective

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The combined use of a levonorgestrel-release intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) appears to be effective for treating women under 40 years of age with atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH) or well-differentiated (G1), endometrioid endometrial cancer (EC) limited to the endometrium, who want to preserve their fertility, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Annals of Oncology.

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Oseltamivir May Prevent Pneumonia in H1N1 Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) treatment appears to be effective in preventing the development of radiographically confirmed pneumonia as well as reducing duration of fever and viral RNA shedding among patients with 2009 H1N1 infection, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in BMJ.

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Behavioral Intervention Cuts ER Use for Chronic Pain

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The inappropriate use of hospital emergency departments by patients seeking relief from chronic pain can be reduced by a behavioral intervention in the emergency department, especially among high-utilization patients, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Vaccines Provide Hep B Immunity in Children for at Least 5 Years

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Infants vaccinated with hexavalent vaccines, including hexavac, appear to maintain immunity to hepatitis B for at least five years after primary vaccination, suggesting that booster doses are not necessary to maintain immunity, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Breast-Feeding Linked to Protection Against Infections

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Exclusive breast-feeding for six months may reduce the frequency and severity of infections in infants in a setting with a well-vaccinated infant population and adequate health standards, according to research published online Sept. 27 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Assaults Linked to Pain in Nursing Home Workers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Many care providers in nursing homes report recent physical assaults in the workplace, and these are associated in a dose-response manner with musculoskeletal pain, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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C-Reactive Protein Levels Vary by Ethnicity

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Mean C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations vary for different ethnic populations, which may affect assessment of cardiovascular risk and eligibility for statin treatment, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

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Anger, Sadness Increase Pain in Women With Fibromyalgia

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Negative emotions increase pain responses in women with and without fibromyalgia (FM), while combined treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy and a tailored exercise program can improve outcome in FM, according to two studies published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Function at Work

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle factors -- particularly smoking and obesity -- are associated with sick leave and decreased productivity among workers, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Look AHEAD Results Favor Intensive Lifestyle Intervention

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for patients with type 2 diabetes can result in sustained improvements in cardiovascular risk factors and in fitness, according to a report published in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Pine Bark Extract Doesn't Improve Cardio Risk Profile

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among subjects with elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, pine bark extract, a dietary supplement rich in antioxidants, does not significantly improve CVD risk profiles, according to a study in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Function Scores Linked to Patient Distress in Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Assessing bother -- or patient distress due to functional losses -- provides insight into patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) following prostate cancer treatment, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Surveillance Varies

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CA-BSI) surveillance practices differ substantially among pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), with more aggressive surveillance practices associated with higher CA-BSI rates, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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BNP Level Up in Many Pregnant Women With Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Measuring B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels of women during pregnancy may be useful in identifying those at risk for adverse cardiac events, according to research published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Several Factors Affect Imaging Research Incidental Findings

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The frequency of incidental findings (IFs) in imaging research exams varies by age, imaging modality, and body region, with routine evaluation of research images allowing for identification of IFs in a large number of cases, resulting in significant medical benefit in a small number of patients, according to research published in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Hospice Disenrollment Tied to Higher Health Care Use

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with cancer who disenroll from hospice are likely to experience increased hospitalization rates and higher Medicare expenditures than those who remain enrolled in hospice until death, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Exercise Preserves Functioning in Women With Osteopenia

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- An exercise program in elderly women with osteopenia appears to preserve physical functioning and decrease the risk of fractures and mortality, according to a study in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Mindfulness-Based Approach May Help MS Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to usual care, a mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) appears to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL), depression, and fatigue among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study in the Sept. 28 issue of Neurology.

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Partner With Breast Cancer Ups Risk for Severe Mood Disorder

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Male partners of women with breast cancer have a significantly increased risk of an affective disorder severe enough to require hospitalization, and this risk increases with increasing severity of the cancer, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Cancer.

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FDA: Octagam Voluntarily Withdrawn From U.S. Market

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Octapharma and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have announced a voluntary market withdrawal of all lots of Immune Globulin Intravenous (human) 5 percent Liquid Preparation (Octagam) currently in the U.S. market, as the drug is potentially associated with an increased number of thromboembolic events.

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Contraceptive Containing a Folate Approved

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Beyaz, a combination estrogen/progestin contraceptive that also contains a folate, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

this approval

Pediatric Intern Education Improves Discharge Summaries

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- An educational intervention to train pediatric resident interns in the preparation of inpatient discharge summaries can significantly improve the quality of this documentation, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Day Care May Up Problems in Lung Disease Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLDP) may be at increased risk for morbidities of that condition if they attend day care, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Pediatrics.

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First-Trimester Heavy Drinking Linked to Birth Defect Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers in Australia have found that heavy drinking in the first trimester appears to increase the risk of birth defects four-fold, though they found a low prevalence of alcohol-related birth defects (ARBDs) as classified by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), according to research published online Sept. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Team Sports Linked to Life Satisfaction in Youths

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Participating in team sports may help improve life satisfaction and self-reported health in middle-school students, according to research published online Sept. 3 in Applied Research in Quality of Life.

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RA May Raise Complication Risk After Ankle Arthroplasty

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Underlying inflammatory connective-tissue disease, primarily rheumatoid arthritis, is associated with an increased risk for major incision complications and additional surgery for patients who have undergone total ankle arthroplasty, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Texting While Driving Tied to Surge in Fatal Accidents

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Texting on cell phones while driving appears to have contributed to a large increase in distracted driving fatalities since 2005, according to research published online Sept. 23 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Flavored, Sports Beverages Tied to Some Healthy Behaviors

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Like consumption of soda, consumption of flavored and sports beverages (FSBs) is associated with unhealthy dietary practices and sedentary behaviors, but unlike soda intake, FSB intake also appears to be associated with a number of healthy lifestyle choices, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Carotid Endarterectomy Tied to Long-Term Stroke Reduction

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) performed in asymptomatic patients under 75 years of age appears to reduce 10-year stroke risks, with half this reduction in disabling or fatal strokes, according to a study published in the Sept. 25 issue of The Lancet.

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CDC Analyzes Neonatal Heart Defect Deaths by Race

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The racial and gestational age differences in neonatal congenital heart defect deaths are significant, but the causes of these differences are not clear, according to a report published in the Sept. 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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HIV Prevalence 19% Among Men Who Have Sex With Men

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) remains high in the United States, and 44 percent of infected MSM do not know they are infected, according to research published in the Sept. 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Low-Volume Hysterectomy Surgeons Tied to Higher Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Morbidity and mortality are higher after hysterectomies performed by surgeons who perform fewer than 10 of these procedures per year, and those who perform at least 10 per year are more likely to perform minimally invasive procedures, according to research published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Children With H1N1 Have More Neurologic Complications

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Children with H1N1 influenza, especially if they have an underlying medical or neurologic condition, appear to be at higher risk for neurologic complications such as seizures and encephalopathy than children with seasonal flu, according to research published online Sept. 23 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Adverse Pathology Not Seen in Deferred Prostatectomy

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Men with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer undergoing prostate-specific antigen surveillance who later have deferred radical prostatectomy do not have significantly worsened pathologic features after surgery than men undergoing primary radical prostatectomy, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Optical Coherence Tomography Detects Tooth Decay

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Optical coherence tomography (OCT) appears to detect tooth decay beneath commonly used dental sealants more effectively than visual or radiographic examination, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Workday Exercise Tied to Invasive Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who get regular exercise during their workday or at home appear to have a reduced risk for developing invasive breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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FDA: Infant Formulas of Similac Powder Recalled

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Abbott has announced a voluntary recall of certain, Similac-brand, powder infant formulas in the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, and some countries in the Caribbean, as the product has a remote chance of containing a small common beetle or their larvae.

www.similac.com/recall
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FDA to Greatly Restrict Use of Rosiglitazone

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced plans to substantially restrict the use of rosiglitazone (Avandia) in type 2 diabetes patients unable to control their disease with other medications.

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Daily 100 mg Milnacipran Found Effective in Fibromyalgia

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Milnacipran at a dosage of 100 mg daily decreases pain and several other symptoms of fibromyalgia, according to research published in the September issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Intake of Water Among U.S. Children Varies by Age

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Intake of water in U.S. children varies by age, more than two-thirds of daily beverages consumed by children and adolescents are with meals, and the mean intake is generally below what is recommended as adequate, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Obstetric/Gynecologic Inpatient Procedures Declining

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The number of inpatient obstetric and gynecologic surgical procedures has been trending downward, though they still make up a sizable proportion of inpatient procedures for U.S. women, according to research published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Nuchal Translucency May Often Be Underestimated

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Nuchal translucency measurements may be systematically underestimated in many centers, according to research published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Venous Thromboembolism Seen After 1% of Hip Replacements

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Venous thromboembolism following total hip replacement occurs in roughly 1 percent of patients who receive pharmacological thromboprophylaxis, and factors associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism include osteoarthritis, a history of cardiovascular disease, and previous thromboembolism, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Home-Based Intervention Beneficial for Anemic Infants

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Infants with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) who receive a home-based intervention -- consisting of weekly visits to foster child development -- show improvements in cognitive and social-emotional scores, but don't quite catch up with nonanemic peers in the latter category, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Gilenya Approved for Relapsing MS

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Gilenya (fingolimod) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reduce relapses and delay disability progression in people with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

ACOG: Ob-Gyns Should Make Obesity Prevention a Priority

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A committee of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is recommending that practitioners take 12 specific actions to help women, especially those in urban areas, achieve and maintain a normal body weight and physical fitness. The committee opinion is published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Botulism Toxin Benefit Seen for Drooling in Children

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Botulinum toxin can help reduce drooling in some children with neurological disorders, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Ablation Therapy Effective for Atrial Fibrillation in Young

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Atrial fibrillation (AF) patients under the age of 45 who undergo ablative therapy experience fewer major complications and similar efficacy as older patients, and have a higher chance of remaining AF free without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), according to research published online Sept. 21 in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

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Antipsychotics Linked to Risk of Venous Thromboembolism

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- People taking antipsychotic medication may be at risk for venous thromboembolism, and the risk varies by drug type and potency, according to research published Sept. 21 in BMJ.

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ACOG: Pregnant Women Should Get Flu Vaccine Early

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Replacing a committee opinion published in 2004, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has released a new report from the Committee on Obstetric Practice supporting influenza vaccination during pregnancy. The new opinion has been published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Link to Depression Differs for Cyber, Traditional Bullying

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The adolescent victims of cyber bullying report higher levels of depression than do the bullies themselves or bully-victims, but this is not the case with traditional forms of bullying, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Father Absence, Early Puberty Association Complex in Girls

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Absence of a biological father in the home predicts earlier onset of breast development in higher-income families and early development of pubic hair in African-American girls from high-income families, according to research published online Sept. 20 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Disc Batteries Can Cause Severe Esophageal Damage

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Ingestion of disc batteries can cause severe injury among pediatric patients and require emergency endoscopic retrieval, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Self-Management Counseling May Not Aid in Heart Failure

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Self-management counseling in addition to an enhanced educational intervention for patients with mild to moderate heart failure does not appear to have any benefit over the educational intervention alone, according to research published in the Sept. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Metabolic Syndrome Tied to Doubled Risk of CV Outcomes

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with metabolic syndrome have a doubled risk of cardiovascular outcomes and a 58 percent higher risk of all-cause mortality, according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Hospitalized Children Have Increasingly Complex Illnesses

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Medically complex children with one or more chronic diseases make up an increasing proportion of pediatric hospital admissions and account for increased use of hospital resources, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Stool DNA Tests Not Cost-Effective for Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Screening Medicare beneficiaries for colorectal cancer (CRC) using stool DNA testing is not currently cost-effective, but could be if the cost per test dropped dramatically or if adherence to the testing were substantially better than for other screening tests, according to an analysis published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Thigh-Length Stockings Help Avert Thromboses After Stroke

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In hospitalized stroke patients, proximal deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is less common in those who wear prophylactic thigh-length stockings than in those who wear below-knee stockings, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Occupational, Leisure Activity Tied to Heart Failure Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Engaging in moderate or high levels of occupational or leisure-time physical activity may reduce the risk of heart failure among both men and women, according to a study in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Testicular Cancer Screening in Asymptomatic Men Not Needed

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- No new evidence has emerged warranting a change in the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's (USPSTF's) 2004 conclusion that screening asymptomatic men for testicular cancer is unlikely to offer benefits over clinical detection, according to a literature review in the Sept. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Influenza Vaccine Tied to Reduced Heart Attack Rate

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza -- but not pneumococcal -- vaccination may reduce the rate of first acute myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Sunless Tanning Promotion Tied to Reduced Sunbathing

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- An intervention aimed at promoting the use of sunless tanning products appears to reduce sunbathing and increase sunless tanning, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology. According to another study in the same issue, approximately 11 percent of U.S. adolescents use sunless tanning products, a practice linked to risky behaviors associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure.

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Childhood Tobacco Smoke Exposure Ups Risk of ADHD

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood increases the odds of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the magnitude of risk seen with elevated serum cotinine levels varies by race, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Trends Noted in Adolescent Bariatric Surgery in California

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In California adolescents, whites and females are having bariatric surgery at rates disproportionate to the rates seen for boys and nonwhites, and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) has increased dramatically among adolescents, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Youths With Type 2 Diabetes Show Autoimmunity Evidence

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- There may be evidence of islet autoimmunity contributing to insulin deficiency in obese youths with type 2 diabetes, and clinical characteristics may be significantly different between those with and without diabetes autoantibody (DAA) positivity, according to a study published in the September issue of Diabetes Care.

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Adenovirus Infection Linked to Childhood Obesity

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children are significantly more likely to test positive for antibodies to adenovirus 36 (AD36) than are non-obese children, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Head Circumference Growth Curves May Be Inaccurate

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Head circumference growth curves in a large primary care population appear to differ substantially -- particularly at upper percentiles -- from the two most recently published head circumference growth curves, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Tiotropium Plus Glucocorticoid Effective in Asthma Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of the long-acting anticholinergic agent tiotropium bromide to an inhaled glucocorticoid is superior to a doubling of the dose of the glucocorticoid in improving lung function and symptoms in patients with uncontrolled asthma, and it is non-inferior to the addition of salmeterol, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with a presentation at the European Respiratory Society Annual Congress, held from Sept. 18 to 22 in Barcelona, Spain.

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Metabolic Imbalance Linked With Asthma in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children with an imbalanced metabolism, which could be due to diet and/or exercise deficiencies, may be at an increased risk for developing asthma regardless of their body mass index (BMI), according to research published online Sept. 17 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Type 1 Diabetes Incidence Up in Children in Italy

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of type 1 diabetes rose in Italian children from 1990 to 2003, with large geographical variation observed, according to an age-period-cohort analysis published in the September issue of Diabetes.

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Smoking Cues Increase Craving As Abstinence Lengthens

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- People who give up smoking experience greater craving in response to smoking cues as the duration of abstinence increases, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Biological Psychiatry.

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Depression, CHD Add Up to Higher Risk of Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease (CHD) have a particularly high risk of all-cause and cardiovascular death compared to individuals with one of these problems or neither, according to research published online Sept. 15 in Heart.

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U.S. Vaccine Coverage Remains High in Young Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Routine vaccination of children between 19 and 35 months of age remains high in the United States, with coverage for most routine vaccines at or near the national objective of 90 percent, according to a report published in the Sept. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Urinary Factors Could Be Link Between DASH Diet, Stone Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Following a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-type diet may reduce the risk of kidney stones by increasing urinary citrate and volume, according to research published online Sept. 16 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Risk Factors for ER Visits in Chronic Opioid Users Identified

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of Schedule II opioids, back pain, headache, and pre-existing substance use disorders are all associated with alcohol- or drug-related encounters (ADEs) and emergency department visits (EDVs) in adults who have taken prescribed opioids for at least 90 days, according to a study published in the Sept. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Educational Attainment on Rise Worldwide in Men, Women

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1970, the global mean number of years of education has increased substantially among both men and women, and increased educational attainment in women of reproductive age may be associated with a drop in deaths among children younger than 5, according to research published in the Sept. 18 issue of The Lancet.

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Glucosamine, Chondroitin Not Effective for Osteoarthritis

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Glucosamine, chondroitin, or a combination of the two does not appear to reduce joint pain associated with osteoarthritis or have an impact on narrowing of the joint space, according to research published online Sept. 16 in BMJ.

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Placebo Effect Tied to Sexual Behavior During Trial

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial proportion of women treated with placebo for female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD) experience clinically significant sexual function improvements, and changes in sexual behavior appear to be predictive of outcomes in sexual function, according to research published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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About 5 Percent of American Adults Report Vigorous Activity

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- On any given day in the United States, most adults perform mostly sedentary and light activities -- with only 5 percent reporting any vigorous activity, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Lung Function Tied to Diabetes and Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Restrictive impaired lung function among men without a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes appears to be associated with fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and incident type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the September issue of Diabetes Care.

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Most in Asian Malay Group With Diabetes Have Poor BP Control

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- More than 75 percent of an Asian Malay population with diabetes has poor glycemic and blood pressure (BP) control, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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