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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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September 2010 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: October 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for September 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

DNA Findings in Children With ADHD Suggest Genetic Cause

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appear to have an increased rate of large, rare chromosomal deletions and duplications, known as copy number variants (CNVs), that have been implicated previously in autism and schizophrenia, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in The Lancet.

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Various Neuroblastoma Treatments Found Effective

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- High-risk neuroblastoma patients may experience increased survival with immunotherapy treatment instead of standard treatment, and intermediate-risk neuroblastoma patients may fare well with a biologically-based treatment and reduced chemotherapy regimen, according to two articles published in the Sept. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Yu (subscription or payment may be required)
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FDA, CSPS Issue Warning on Infant Sleep Positioners

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Use of infant sleep positioners could result in death, state the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CSPS) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in a warning released Sept. 29.

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Vaccines Provide Hep B Immunity in Children for at Least 5 Years

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Infants vaccinated with hexavalent vaccines, including hexavac, appear to maintain immunity to hepatitis B for at least five years after primary vaccination, suggesting that booster doses are not necessary to maintain immunity, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Breast-Feeding Linked to Protection Against Infections

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Exclusive breast-feeding for six months may reduce the frequency and severity of infections in infants in a setting with a well-vaccinated infant population and adequate health standards, according to research published online Sept. 27 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Surveillance Varies

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CA-BSI) surveillance practices differ substantially among pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), with more aggressive surveillance practices associated with higher CA-BSI rates, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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FDA: Octagam Voluntarily Withdrawn From U.S. Market

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Octapharma and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have announced a voluntary market withdrawal of all lots of Immune Globulin Intravenous (human) 5 percent Liquid Preparation (Octagam) currently in the U.S. market, as the drug is potentially associated with an increased number of thromboembolic events.

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Contraceptive Containing a Folate Approved

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Beyaz, a combination estrogen/progestin contraceptive that also contains a folate, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

this approval

Pediatric Intern Education Improves Discharge Summaries

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- An educational intervention to train pediatric resident interns in the preparation of inpatient discharge summaries can significantly improve the quality of this documentation, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Day Care May Up Problems in Lung Disease Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLDP) may be at increased risk for morbidities of that condition if they attend day care, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Pediatrics.

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First-Trimester Heavy Drinking Linked to Birth Defect Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers in Australia have found that heavy drinking in the first trimester appears to increase the risk of birth defects four-fold, though they found a low prevalence of alcohol-related birth defects (ARBDs) as classified by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), according to research published online Sept. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Team Sports Linked to Life Satisfaction in Youths

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Participating in team sports may help improve life satisfaction and self-reported health in middle-school students, according to research published online Sept. 3 in Applied Research in Quality of Life.

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More Evidence Needed for Severe Primary Hypospadias

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Though the medical literature offers general recommendations for treating primary severe hypospadias, more information is needed to guide patient stratification and to define outcome measures to allow for better comparison of surgical approaches, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
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Flavored, Sports Beverages Tied to Some Healthy Behaviors

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Like consumption of soda, consumption of flavored and sports beverages (FSBs) is associated with unhealthy dietary practices and sedentary behaviors, but unlike soda intake, FSB intake also appears to be associated with a number of healthy lifestyle choices, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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CDC Analyzes Neonatal Heart Defect Deaths by Race

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The racial and gestational age differences in neonatal congenital heart defect deaths are significant, but the causes of these differences are not clear, according to a report published in the Sept. 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Children With H1N1 Have More Neurologic Complications

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Children with H1N1 influenza, especially if they have an underlying medical or neurologic condition, appear to be at higher risk for neurologic complications such as seizures and encephalopathy than children with seasonal flu, according to research published online Sept. 23 in the Annals of Neurology.

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FDA: Infant Formulas of Similac Powder Recalled

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Abbott has announced a voluntary recall of certain, Similac-brand, powder infant formulas in the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, and some countries in the Caribbean, as the product has a remote chance of containing a small common beetle or their larvae.

www.similac.com/recall
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Intake of Water Among U.S. Children Varies by Age

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Intake of water in U.S. children varies by age, more than two-thirds of daily beverages consumed by children and adolescents are with meals, and the mean intake is generally below what is recommended as adequate, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract
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Researchers Identify Alleles Associated With Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified a handful of common alleles that are related to the risk of developing asthma, and their findings have been published in the Sept. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Home-Based Intervention Beneficial for Anemic Infants

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Infants with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) who receive a home-based intervention -- consisting of weekly visits to foster child development -- show improvements in cognitive and social-emotional scores, but don't quite catch up with nonanemic peers in the latter category, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Botulism Toxin Benefit Seen for Drooling in Children

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Botulinum toxin can help reduce drooling in some children with neurological disorders, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Link to Depression Differs for Cyber, Traditional Bullying

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The adolescent victims of cyber bullying report higher levels of depression than do the bullies themselves or bully-victims, but this is not the case with traditional forms of bullying, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Abstract
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Father Absence, Early Puberty Association Complex in Girls

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Absence of a biological father in the home predicts earlier onset of breast development in higher-income families and early development of pubic hair in African-American girls from high-income families, according to research published online Sept. 20 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Disc Batteries Can Cause Severe Esophageal Damage

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Ingestion of disc batteries can cause severe injury among pediatric patients and require emergency endoscopic retrieval, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Hospitalized Children Have Increasingly Complex Illnesses

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Medically complex children with one or more chronic diseases make up an increasing proportion of pediatric hospital admissions and account for increased use of hospital resources, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Burns
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Abstract - Simon
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Sunless Tanning Promotion Tied to Reduced Sunbathing

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- An intervention aimed at promoting the use of sunless tanning products appears to reduce sunbathing and increase sunless tanning, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology. According to another study in the same issue, approximately 11 percent of U.S. adolescents use sunless tanning products, a practice linked to risky behaviors associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure.

Abstract - Pagoto
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Abstract - Cokkinides
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Childhood Tobacco Smoke Exposure Ups Risk of ADHD

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood increases the odds of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the magnitude of risk seen with elevated serum cotinine levels varies by race, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Trends Noted in Adolescent Bariatric Surgery in California

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In California adolescents, whites and females are having bariatric surgery at rates disproportionate to the rates seen for boys and nonwhites, and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) has increased dramatically among adolescents, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Youths With Type 2 Diabetes Show Autoimmunity Evidence

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- There may be evidence of islet autoimmunity contributing to insulin deficiency in obese youths with type 2 diabetes, and clinical characteristics may be significantly different between those with and without diabetes autoantibody (DAA) positivity, according to a study published in the September issue of Diabetes Care.

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Adenovirus Infection Linked to Childhood Obesity

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children are significantly more likely to test positive for antibodies to adenovirus 36 (AD36) than are non-obese children, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Head Circumference Growth Curves May Be Inaccurate

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Head circumference growth curves in a large primary care population appear to differ substantially -- particularly at upper percentiles -- from the two most recently published head circumference growth curves, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Metabolic Imbalance Linked With Asthma in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children with an imbalanced metabolism, which could be due to diet and/or exercise deficiencies, may be at an increased risk for developing asthma regardless of their body mass index (BMI), according to research published online Sept. 17 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Type 1 Diabetes Incidence Up in Children in Italy

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of type 1 diabetes rose in Italian children from 1990 to 2003, with large geographical variation observed, according to an age-period-cohort analysis published in the September issue of Diabetes.

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U.S. Vaccine Coverage Remains High in Young Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Routine vaccination of children between 19 and 35 months of age remains high in the United States, with coverage for most routine vaccines at or near the national objective of 90 percent, according to a report published in the Sept. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Educational Attainment on Rise Worldwide in Men, Women

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1970, the global mean number of years of education has increased substantially among both men and women, and increased educational attainment in women of reproductive age may be associated with a drop in deaths among children younger than 5, according to research published in the Sept. 18 issue of The Lancet.

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Noninvasive Test Predicts Morbidity in Preterm Infants

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a noninvasive tool based on gestational age, birth weight, and real-time data routinely collected in neonatal intensive care units to predict morbidity risk in premature infants; their findings have been published in the Sept. 8 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract
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Playing Hoops Is a Common Cause of Pediatric Injuries

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Though basketball-related injuries requiring emergency treatment appear to be declining, their frequency is a reason for concern, according to research published online Sept. 13 in Pediatrics.

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FDA Issues Label Change for Valganciclovir Hydrochloride

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted health care professionals of new pediatric dosing recommendations for valganciclovir hydrochloride (Valcyte) in an effort to prevent overdosing in children with low body weight, low body surface area, and below normal serum creatinine.

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Activity Levels Decline Over 12 Months in Schoolchildren

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers studying physical activity in children found that levels of activity decreased in 10-year-olds over only one year's time; their findings have been published online Sept. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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No-Smoking Law Linked to Lower Asthma Rates

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Since comprehensive smoke-free legislation was introduced in Scotland, incidence of asthma has fallen among people without occupational exposure to environmental tobacco smoke -- namely, children, according to research published in the Sept. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Depression, Burnout Have Dire Impact on Medical Training

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Depressed medical students are more likely to endorse depression stigma attitudes than nondepressed students, and those with burnout are more likely to engage in unprofessional conduct and less likely to hold altruistic views of physicians' social responsibilities than those without burnout, according to two articles published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Schwenk
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Abstract - Dyrbye
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Sacrifice Makes Industry Gifts Seem More Acceptable

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Residents who are reminded of the sacrifices they made to attain their medical education tend to rate the acceptability of industry-sponsored gifts higher than those who are not reminded, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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3-D Scans Show Helmets Are Best for Infant Plagiocephaly

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- For infants with deformational plagiocephaly (DP) -- defined as unilateral occipital flattening, often with ipsilateral frontal bulging resulting from sleep position, myoneural dysfunction, or intrauterine positioning -- orthotic helmets are superior to active repositioning in reducing the degree of head asymmetry, according to research published online Sept. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Cryotherapy Most Effective Treatment for Common Warts

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- To cure common warts, cryotherapy is more effective than topical salicylic acid, but for plantar warts, neither treatment is significantly more effective than simply taking a wait-and-see approach, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
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ADHD Drug Helps Childhood Cancer Survivors in Long Term

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Methylphenidate (MPH), the stimulant drug most commonly prescribed to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, appears to ameliorate behavior and attention problems in childhood cancer survivors over the course of a year, according to research published online Sept. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Individually Optimized Therapy Reduces ADHD Problems

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), disruptive levels of aggression, and a history of insufficient response to stimulant medication may benefit from a protocol of individually optimized stimulant monotherapy and behavioral intervention, according to research published online Sept. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Nucleotide Supplementation Beneficial for Infant Growth

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Supplementation with dietary nucleotides, compounds found in breast milk, appears to result in increased weight gain and head growth in infants who are formula-fed, according to research published online Sept. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Re-Consent Important Before Secondary Use of Genetic Data

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Most research participants want to be asked for secondary consent -- referred to as re-consent -- before their existing personal genetic data are added to the federal database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics.

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Thimerosal Not Linked to Autism Spectrum Disorder

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal and early-life exposure to thimerosal-containing vaccines and immunoglobulin preparations does not increase the risk of either autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or two subcategories of the disorder, according to research published online Sept. 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Secondary Overtriage More Common in Pediatric Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Secondary overtriage -- involving rapid discharge after transferring a patient between hospitals -- appears more common in pediatric patients, and may come at a considerable cost to the health care system, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Trauma.

Abstract
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Chemical Poisoning Treatment Approved for Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A treatment for poisoning from pesticides and similar chemicals has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in children, nearly 50 years after it was first approved for adults.

organophosphate poisoning

Hospitalized Children Require Good Coordination by Doctors

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive care of children requiring hospitalization requires a family-centered approach and thorough coordination among all physicians involved, according to a clinical report published online Sept. 6 in Pediatrics.

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Exposure to Lead May Delay Onset of Puberty in Girls

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to lead (Pb) in childhood is associated with an increased risk of delayed puberty in girls, particularly in girls who also have high levels of cadmium (Cd), according to a study published online July 30 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Many Pediatric Primary Care Doctors Don't Use Spirometry

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Spirometry use is limited among pediatric primary care physicians, particularly pediatricians, suggesting a need for additional physician training, according to research published online Sept. 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Crohn's-Related Surgery Risk in Children Rarer Than Thought

THURSDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of bowel surgery in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD) patients appears to be lower than previously reported, and early initiation of immunomodulators does not appear to influence the risk of bowel surgery, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Marginally Low Birth Weight Ups Iron Deficiency Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Iron supplementation at 2 mg/kg per day from 6 weeks to 6 months of age reduces the elevated risk of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in marginally low birth weight (MLBW) infants, without short-term adverse effects on growth or morbidity, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Annual Medical Liability Costs Surpass $50 Billion

THURSDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The annual costs of the medical liability system in the United States total more than $50 billion, which accounts for a relatively small but non-trivial portion of total health care spending, according to an article in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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Guidelines Developed for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

THURSDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical practice guidelines for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have been developed by a task force of The Endocrine Society and published in the September issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Radiologists Can ID, Treat Self-Embedding Behavior

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Radiologists can play an important role in identifying self-embedding behavior, and percutaneous radiologic treatment of foreign bodies embedded into soft tissue is safe and precise, according to research published online Sept. 7 in Radiology.

Abstract
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Adolescents With Chronic Fatigue May Suffer Long-Term Effects

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who do not recover from chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) continue to experience extreme fatigue, to use medical services at a high rate, and to miss school and work; and, those who attempt to keep up with their healthy peers experience greater fatigue and need for sleep, according to two articles published in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract - van Geelen
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U.S. Adult Smoking Rate Stabilizes After Decline

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of U.S. adult smokers has remained stable since a decline between 2000 and 2005, with rates of secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmokers remaining high despite recent decreases, according to two early-release reports published Sept. 7 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Limitation of End-of-Life Support Varies Among PICUs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, there is significant variability among institutions regarding limitation of end-of-life support for children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), with black race and a lack of trainees associated with a lower frequency of limitation decisions, according to research published online Sept. 6 in Pediatrics.

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Insufficient Nighttime Sleep in Early Life Tied to Obesity Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Infants and preschool-aged children who do not get sufficient nighttime sleep may be at higher risk of subsequently being overweight or obese, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Parental Depression Risk Highest in First Year After Birth

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of depression among parents is highest in the first year after a child is born, with history of depression, younger parental age, and increased social deprivation linked to a higher risk of depression, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Vitamin D Levels in Newborns Tied to Schizophrenia Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Both low and high serum concentrations of vitamin D in neonates are associated with an elevated risk of eventual development of schizophrenia, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Nevirapine Reuse in Children With HIV May Be Safe

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- After achieving viral suppression with protease inhibitor-based therapy, most children infected with HIV at birth despite being given nevirapine may safely be switched back to nevirapine-based therapy without fear of drug resistance, according to a study published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Graded Symptom Checklist IDs Pediatric Concussion

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A graded symptom checklist reliably identifies concussions (mild traumatic brain injuries [mTBIs]) in school-age children, and posttraumatic amnesia predicts greater symptom severity, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Pandemic H1N1 Affected Younger Patients Than H3N2

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The median age of individuals affected by 2009 H1N1 influenza was substantially lower than that of individuals affected by 2007/2008 H3N2 influenza; however, the risk of most serious complications was not higher in those with 2009 H1N1 than in those with recent seasonal influenza strains, according to research published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Serotype 19A Acquisition Tied to Vaccine Schedule

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination (PCV-7) using a 2+1 dosing schedule may result in an increase in serotype 19A nasopharyngeal acquisition, according to a study in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Bisphenol A Benefits in Dentistry May Outweigh Risks

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A (BPA) and BPA derivatives have endocrine-disrupting and estrogenic properties and may pose a health risk, but their benefits may outweigh potential risks when they are used with care in childhood dentistry, according to research published online Sept. 6 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Urban Clinic Increases HIV Testing Uptake in Adolescents

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- After the publication of national recommendations for routine HIV testing and the implementation of rapid testing, the rate of HIV testing among adolescents at an urban adolescent primary care clinic substantially increased, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Toddlers' Fixation on Moving Patterns May Predict Autism

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A preference for moving geometric patterns as opposed to social images appears to be an easy-to-detect signature of toddlers who are at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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PFOA, PFOS Appear to Raise Lipid Levels in Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Increased perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) levels are associated with elevated serum lipid levels in children and adolescents, though the links warrant further evaluation, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Early Severe Hypoglycemia Tied to Poorer Cognition

FRIDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to severe hypoglycemia (SH) at an early age may negatively impact long-term cognitive function in individuals with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published in the September issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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CDC: Prescription Drug Use in U.S. Has Increased

THURSDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In the last decade, prescription drug use in the United States has increased, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Sucrose May Not Be Effective Analgesic in Newborns

THURSDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The common practice of using a sucrose solution to provide analgesia for newborns undergoing painful procedures may alter newborns' facial expressions but does not appear to reduce pain activity in the spinal cord or brain, according to research published online Sept. 1 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Few Connecticut Doctors Treat Chronic Lyme Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Relatively few Connecticut primary care physicians are diagnosing and treating chronic Lyme disease, compared to a much larger number who are undecided on the existence of the condition or don't believe it exists, according to research published online Sept. 2 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Acetaminophen May Increase Pediatric Asthma Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Use of acetaminophen in children may increase the risk of asthma, eczema, and rhinoconjunctivitis, according to research published online Aug. 13 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Fatty Liver Linked to Insulin Resistance in Obese Teens

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In obese adolescents, fatty liver -- independent of visceral fat and intramyocellular lipid content (IMCL) -- is associated with impaired insulin activity in the muscles and liver; along with other findings, this suggests the liver plays a key role in insulin resistance in these individuals, according to research published in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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