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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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September 2010 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: October 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for September 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

DNA Findings in Children With ADHD Suggest Genetic Cause

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appear to have an increased rate of large, rare chromosomal deletions and duplications, known as copy number variants (CNVs), that have been implicated previously in autism and schizophrenia, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in The Lancet.

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Blacks With Prostate Cancer Have Better Well-Being

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- African-American men recently diagnosed with prostate cancer may have better emotional well-being than white men with prostate cancer, despite similar physical functioning, according to research published in the September issue of Urology.

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Assaults Linked to Pain in Nursing Home Workers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Many care providers in nursing homes report recent physical assaults in the workplace, and these are associated in a dose-response manner with musculoskeletal pain, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Anger, Sadness Increase Pain in Women With Fibromyalgia

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Negative emotions increase pain responses in women with and without fibromyalgia (FM), while combined treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy and a tailored exercise program can improve outcome in FM, according to two studies published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract - van Middendorp
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Function Scores Linked to Patient Distress in Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Assessing bother -- or patient distress due to functional losses -- provides insight into patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) following prostate cancer treatment, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Mindfulness-Based Approach May Help MS Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to usual care, a mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) appears to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL), depression, and fatigue among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study in the Sept. 28 issue of Neurology.

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Partner With Breast Cancer Ups Risk for Severe Mood Disorder

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Male partners of women with breast cancer have a significantly increased risk of an affective disorder severe enough to require hospitalization, and this risk increases with increasing severity of the cancer, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Cancer.

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Team Sports Linked to Life Satisfaction in Youths

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Participating in team sports may help improve life satisfaction and self-reported health in middle-school students, according to research published online Sept. 3 in Applied Research in Quality of Life.

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Higher Altitude May Be Risk Factor for Suicide

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The altitude at which a person resides is an independent predictor of the risk of suicide, according to research published online Sept. 15 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Home-Based Intervention Beneficial for Anemic Infants

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Infants with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) who receive a home-based intervention -- consisting of weekly visits to foster child development -- show improvements in cognitive and social-emotional scores, but don't quite catch up with nonanemic peers in the latter category, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Antipsychotics Linked to Risk of Venous Thromboembolism

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- People taking antipsychotic medication may be at risk for venous thromboembolism, and the risk varies by drug type and potency, according to research published Sept. 21 in BMJ.

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Link to Depression Differs for Cyber, Traditional Bullying

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The adolescent victims of cyber bullying report higher levels of depression than do the bullies themselves or bully-victims, but this is not the case with traditional forms of bullying, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Father Absence, Early Puberty Association Complex in Girls

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Absence of a biological father in the home predicts earlier onset of breast development in higher-income families and early development of pubic hair in African-American girls from high-income families, according to research published online Sept. 20 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Childhood Tobacco Smoke Exposure Ups Risk of ADHD

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood increases the odds of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the magnitude of risk seen with elevated serum cotinine levels varies by race, according to research published online Sept. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Smoking Cues Increase Craving As Abstinence Lengthens

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- People who give up smoking experience greater craving in response to smoking cues as the duration of abstinence increases, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Biological Psychiatry.

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Introspective Abilities Related to Prefrontal Cortex Anatomy

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The ability to introspectively examine one's thoughts appears to be related to the anatomy of an individual's anterior prefrontal cortex, according to research published in the Sept. 17 issue of Science.

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Depression, CHD Add Up to Higher Risk of Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease (CHD) have a particularly high risk of all-cause and cardiovascular death compared to individuals with one of these problems or neither, according to research published online Sept. 15 in Heart.

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Risk Factors for ER Visits in Chronic Opioid Users Identified

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of Schedule II opioids, back pain, headache, and pre-existing substance use disorders are all associated with alcohol- or drug-related encounters (ADEs) and emergency department visits (EDVs) in adults who have taken prescribed opioids for at least 90 days, according to a study published in the Sept. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Placebo Effect Tied to Sexual Behavior During Trial

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial proportion of women treated with placebo for female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD) experience clinically significant sexual function improvements, and changes in sexual behavior appear to be predictive of outcomes in sexual function, according to research published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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High Cortisol Levels Associated With Cardiovascular Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of cortisol strongly predict cardiovascular death, even in people without pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to research published online Aug. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Depression Management Program Effective in Long Term

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Chronically depressed patients with persistent symptoms can benefit significantly over the long term from a program of low-intensity depression disease management, according to a study in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Age-, Disease-Related Dementia Have Same Pathology

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Age-related and disease-related dementia are associated with the same types of neuropathologic changes in the brain, according to research published online Sept. 15 in Neurology.

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Neural Clues Identified for Postpartum Depression

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified neural mechanisms -- diminished dorsomedial prefrontal cortex activity and amygdala connectivity -- that may play a role in postpartum depression and impaired maternal attachment processes; their findings have been published online Sept. 15 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Distressed Personality Tied to Cardiovascular Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Type D (distressed) personality, a general propensity to distress defined by high "negative affectivity" and "social inhibition" scores, has adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes, according to research published in the September issue of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Depression, Burnout Have Dire Impact on Medical Training

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Depressed medical students are more likely to endorse depression stigma attitudes than nondepressed students, and those with burnout are more likely to engage in unprofessional conduct and less likely to hold altruistic views of physicians' social responsibilities than those without burnout, according to two articles published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Schwenk
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Abstract - Dyrbye
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Sacrifice Makes Industry Gifts Seem More Acceptable

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Residents who are reminded of the sacrifices they made to attain their medical education tend to rate the acceptability of industry-sponsored gifts higher than those who are not reminded, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Home Hospice Cancer Deaths Easier on Patients, Caregivers

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Terminal cancer patients who die in the hospital have higher distress levels and worse quality of life (QoL) at the end of life (EOL) than those who die at home with hospice care, and their bereaved caregivers are more likely to experience psychiatric illness, according to research published online Sept. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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ADHD Drug Helps Childhood Cancer Survivors in Long Term

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Methylphenidate (MPH), the stimulant drug most commonly prescribed to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, appears to ameliorate behavior and attention problems in childhood cancer survivors over the course of a year, according to research published online Sept. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Re-Consent Important Before Secondary Use of Genetic Data

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Most research participants want to be asked for secondary consent -- referred to as re-consent -- before their existing personal genetic data are added to the federal database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics.

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Annual Medical Liability Costs Surpass $50 Billion

THURSDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The annual costs of the medical liability system in the United States total more than $50 billion, which accounts for a relatively small but non-trivial portion of total health care spending, according to an article in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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Radiologists Can ID, Treat Self-Embedding Behavior

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Radiologists can play an important role in identifying self-embedding behavior, and percutaneous radiologic treatment of foreign bodies embedded into soft tissue is safe and precise, according to research published online Sept. 7 in Radiology.

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Social Factors Influence Physiology After Cardiac Arrest

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In a mouse model of cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR), mice that had been socially isolated had a worsened physiologic state post-resuscitation than non-isolated mice, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Parental Depression Risk Highest in First Year After Birth

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of depression among parents is highest in the first year after a child is born, with history of depression, younger parental age, and increased social deprivation linked to a higher risk of depression, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Vitamin D Levels in Newborns Tied to Schizophrenia Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Both low and high serum concentrations of vitamin D in neonates are associated with an elevated risk of eventual development of schizophrenia, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Psychological Violence Predicts Postnatal Depression

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Intimate-partner psychological violence during pregnancy is strongly associated with the development of postnatal depression, and this relationship is independent of physical or sexual violence, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in The Lancet.

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Mild Cognitive Impairment Risk Higher for Men Than Women

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- About 16 percent of dementia-free elderly individuals have mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and the risk for MCI is higher in men than in women, according to a study in the Sept. 7 issue of Neurology.

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Toddlers' Fixation on Moving Patterns May Predict Autism

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A preference for moving geometric patterns as opposed to social images appears to be an easy-to-detect signature of toddlers who are at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Psilocybin Improves Anxiety, Mood in Advanced Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate doses of the hallucinogen psilocybin appear to be safe and feasible for reducing anxiety in patients with advanced-stage cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Dense Social Networks May Promote New Health Practices

MONDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals living in networks with dense clusters of connections are more likely to adopt new health practices than are those in networks with many distant connections, according to a study in the Sept. 3 issue of Science.

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Early Severe Hypoglycemia Tied to Poorer Cognition

FRIDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to severe hypoglycemia (SH) at an early age may negatively impact long-term cognitive function in individuals with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published in the September issue of Diabetes Care.

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Dementia Risk Higher for Vets With Post-Traumatic Stress

FRIDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Older veterans who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at higher risk for dementia than those who don't have PTSD, even higher than those who suffered traumatic injury in action, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Cognitive Activity Impacts Alzheimer's Disease Progression

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitively stimulating activity may slow cognitive decline prior to dementia onset in Alzheimer's disease (AD) but lead to faster decline after onset, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Neurology.

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Insomnia, Short Sleep Duration Linked to Mortality in Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Insomnia with objective short sleep duration is related to an increased risk of mortality among men, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of SLEEP.

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