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Category: Internal Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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September 2010 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Last Updated: October 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for September 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Watchful Waiting Shows Cost Advantage in Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Watchful waiting with active surveillance (WWAS) may steeply reduce costs compared to radical prostatectomy in men with low-risk prostate cancer, according to research published in the September issue of Urology.

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Comorbidities at Prostatectomy Tied to Other Causes of Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Men undergoing radical prostatectomy who have greater comorbidity after surgery also have a higher risk of death from other causes than prostate cancer, so assessing patients' other conditions may be advisable when considering treatment, according to research published in the September issue of Urology.

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Tanezumab Is Effective Osteoarthritis Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Tanezumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds and inhibits nerve growth factor, appears to relieve joint pain enough to improve function in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, according to research published online Sept. 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Oseltamivir May Prevent Pneumonia in H1N1 Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) treatment appears to be effective in preventing the development of radiographically confirmed pneumonia as well as reducing duration of fever and viral RNA shedding among patients with 2009 H1N1 infection, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in BMJ.

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Behavioral Intervention Cuts ER Use for Chronic Pain

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The inappropriate use of hospital emergency departments by patients seeking relief from chronic pain can be reduced by a behavioral intervention in the emergency department, especially among high-utilization patients, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Assaults Linked to Pain in Nursing Home Workers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Many care providers in nursing homes report recent physical assaults in the workplace, and these are associated in a dose-response manner with musculoskeletal pain, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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C-Reactive Protein Levels Vary by Ethnicity

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Mean C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations vary for different ethnic populations, which may affect assessment of cardiovascular risk and eligibility for statin treatment, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

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Taribavirin Shows Benefit in Hepatitis C Versus Ribavirin

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Taribavirin (TBV) appears to be a safe and effective alternative to ribavirin (RBV) for treating chronic hepatitis C, with lower associated rates of anemia, according to research published in the October issue of Hepatology.

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Anger, Sadness Increase Pain in Women With Fibromyalgia

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Negative emotions increase pain responses in women with and without fibromyalgia (FM), while combined treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy and a tailored exercise program can improve outcome in FM, according to two studies published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Function at Work

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle factors -- particularly smoking and obesity -- are associated with sick leave and decreased productivity among workers, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Look AHEAD Results Favor Intensive Lifestyle Intervention

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for patients with type 2 diabetes can result in sustained improvements in cardiovascular risk factors and in fitness, according to a report published in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Anti-Apo A-1 Marker for Cardiac Events in RA Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- An IgG antibody called anti-apolipoprotein A-1 (anti-Apo A-1) is predictive of major cardiovascular events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to research published in the September issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Pine Bark Extract Doesn't Improve Cardio Risk Profile

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among subjects with elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, pine bark extract, a dietary supplement rich in antioxidants, does not significantly improve CVD risk profiles, according to a study in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Function Scores Linked to Patient Distress in Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Assessing bother -- or patient distress due to functional losses -- provides insight into patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) following prostate cancer treatment, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Racial Disparities Seen With End-of-Life Discussions

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Black patients with advanced cancer who have had end-of-life (EOL) discussions with their physicians still tend to receive more life-prolonging care than white patients who have had such discussions, according to a study in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Several Factors Affect Imaging Research Incidental Findings

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The frequency of incidental findings (IFs) in imaging research exams varies by age, imaging modality, and body region, with routine evaluation of research images allowing for identification of IFs in a large number of cases, resulting in significant medical benefit in a small number of patients, according to research published in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Hospice Disenrollment Tied to Higher Health Care Use

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with cancer who disenroll from hospice are likely to experience increased hospitalization rates and higher Medicare expenditures than those who remain enrolled in hospice until death, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Exercise Preserves Functioning in Women With Osteopenia

TUESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- An exercise program in elderly women with osteopenia appears to preserve physical functioning and decrease the risk of fractures and mortality, according to a study in the Sept. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Mindfulness-Based Approach May Help MS Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to usual care, a mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) appears to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL), depression, and fatigue among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study in the Sept. 28 issue of Neurology.

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Partner With Breast Cancer Ups Risk for Severe Mood Disorder

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Male partners of women with breast cancer have a significantly increased risk of an affective disorder severe enough to require hospitalization, and this risk increases with increasing severity of the cancer, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Cancer.

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FDA: Certain Lots of Epogen and Procrit Recalled

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Amgen have notified health care professionals that certain lots of epoetin alfa (Epogen and Procrit) are being recalled, as product vials may contain extremely thin glass flakes (lamellae) that could result in serious adverse events.

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RA May Raise Complication Risk After Ankle Arthroplasty

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Underlying inflammatory connective-tissue disease, primarily rheumatoid arthritis, is associated with an increased risk for major incision complications and additional surgery for patients who have undergone total ankle arthroplasty, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Texting While Driving Tied to Surge in Fatal Accidents

MONDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Texting on cell phones while driving appears to have contributed to a large increase in distracted driving fatalities since 2005, according to research published online Sept. 23 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Carotid Endarterectomy Tied to Long-Term Stroke Reduction

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) performed in asymptomatic patients under 75 years of age appears to reduce 10-year stroke risks, with half this reduction in disabling or fatal strokes, according to a study published in the Sept. 25 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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HIV Prevalence 19% Among Men Who Have Sex With Men

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) remains high in the United States, and 44 percent of infected MSM do not know they are infected, according to research published in the Sept. 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Adverse Pathology Not Seen in Deferred Prostatectomy

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Men with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer undergoing prostate-specific antigen surveillance who later have deferred radical prostatectomy do not have significantly worsened pathologic features after surgery than men undergoing primary radical prostatectomy, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Workday Exercise Tied to Invasive Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who get regular exercise during their workday or at home appear to have a reduced risk for developing invasive breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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FDA to Greatly Restrict Use of Rosiglitazone

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced plans to substantially restrict the use of rosiglitazone (Avandia) in type 2 diabetes patients unable to control their disease with other medications.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Linked to Heart Wall Motion Issues

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Subclinical atherosclerosis, as measured by coronary artery calcium (CAC), is associated with a higher chance of later regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMAs), according to research published in the October issue of Radiology.

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Daily 100 mg Milnacipran Found Effective in Fibromyalgia

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Milnacipran at a dosage of 100 mg daily decreases pain and several other symptoms of fibromyalgia, according to research published in the September issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Venous Thromboembolism Seen After 1% of Hip Replacements

THURSDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Venous thromboembolism following total hip replacement occurs in roughly 1 percent of patients who receive pharmacological thromboprophylaxis, and factors associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism include osteoarthritis, a history of cardiovascular disease, and previous thromboembolism, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Fondaparinux Effective in Superficial-Vein Thrombosis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Fondaparinux appears to be safe and effective for reducing symptomatic superficial-vein thrombosis of the legs and may reduce the risk of that condition progressing to deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, according to the results of a large randomized trial published in the Sept. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Researchers Identify Alleles Associated With Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified a handful of common alleles that are related to the risk of developing asthma, and their findings have been published in the Sept. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Gilenya Approved for Relapsing MS

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Gilenya (fingolimod) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reduce relapses and delay disability progression in people with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Ablation Therapy Effective for Atrial Fibrillation in Young

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Atrial fibrillation (AF) patients under the age of 45 who undergo ablative therapy experience fewer major complications and similar efficacy as older patients, and have a higher chance of remaining AF free without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), according to research published online Sept. 21 in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

Abstract
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Antipsychotics Linked to Risk of Venous Thromboembolism

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- People taking antipsychotic medication may be at risk for venous thromboembolism, and the risk varies by drug type and potency, according to research published Sept. 21 in BMJ.

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ACOG: Pregnant Women Should Get Flu Vaccine Early

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Replacing a committee opinion published in 2004, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has released a new report from the Committee on Obstetric Practice supporting influenza vaccination during pregnancy. The new opinion has been published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Self-Management Counseling May Not Aid in Heart Failure

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Self-management counseling in addition to an enhanced educational intervention for patients with mild to moderate heart failure does not appear to have any benefit over the educational intervention alone, according to research published in the Sept. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low-Dose Heparin May Not Be Better Than Standard-Dose

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In high-risk patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes initially treated with fondaparinux, low-dose heparin does not appear to reduce major peri-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) bleeding or vascular access site complications, according to research published in the Sept. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Metabolic Syndrome Tied to Doubled Risk of CV Outcomes

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with metabolic syndrome have a doubled risk of cardiovascular outcomes and a 58 percent higher risk of all-cause mortality, according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Stool DNA Tests Not Cost-Effective for Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Screening Medicare beneficiaries for colorectal cancer (CRC) using stool DNA testing is not currently cost-effective, but could be if the cost per test dropped dramatically or if adherence to the testing were substantially better than for other screening tests, according to an analysis published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Thigh-Length Stockings Help Avert Thromboses After Stroke

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In hospitalized stroke patients, proximal deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is less common in those who wear prophylactic thigh-length stockings than in those who wear below-knee stockings, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Occupational, Leisure Activity Tied to Heart Failure Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Engaging in moderate or high levels of occupational or leisure-time physical activity may reduce the risk of heart failure among both men and women, according to a study in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Adding Clopidogrel to PPIs Does Not Increase Cardio Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes after discharge in patients hospitalized for myocardial infarction (MI); however, concomitant use of clopidogrel is not associated with any additional cardiovascular risk, according to a study in the Sept. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Testicular Cancer Screening in Asymptomatic Men Not Needed

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- No new evidence has emerged warranting a change in the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's (USPSTF's) 2004 conclusion that screening asymptomatic men for testicular cancer is unlikely to offer benefits over clinical detection, according to a literature review in the Sept. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Influenza Vaccine Tied to Reduced Heart Attack Rate

TUESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza -- but not pneumococcal -- vaccination may reduce the rate of first acute myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Tiotropium Plus Glucocorticoid Effective in Asthma Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of the long-acting anticholinergic agent tiotropium bromide to an inhaled glucocorticoid is superior to a doubling of the dose of the glucocorticoid in improving lung function and symptoms in patients with uncontrolled asthma, and it is non-inferior to the addition of salmeterol, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with a presentation at the European Respiratory Society Annual Congress, held from Sept. 18 to 22 in Barcelona, Spain.

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Depression, CHD Add Up to Higher Risk of Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease (CHD) have a particularly high risk of all-cause and cardiovascular death compared to individuals with one of these problems or neither, according to research published online Sept. 15 in Heart.

Abstract
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Urinary Factors Could Be Link Between DASH Diet, Stone Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Following a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-type diet may reduce the risk of kidney stones by increasing urinary citrate and volume, according to research published online Sept. 16 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
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Risk Factors for ER Visits in Chronic Opioid Users Identified

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of Schedule II opioids, back pain, headache, and pre-existing substance use disorders are all associated with alcohol- or drug-related encounters (ADEs) and emergency department visits (EDVs) in adults who have taken prescribed opioids for at least 90 days, according to a study published in the Sept. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Educational Attainment on Rise Worldwide in Men, Women

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1970, the global mean number of years of education has increased substantially among both men and women, and increased educational attainment in women of reproductive age may be associated with a drop in deaths among children younger than 5, according to research published in the Sept. 18 issue of The Lancet.

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Glucosamine, Chondroitin Not Effective for Osteoarthritis

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Glucosamine, chondroitin, or a combination of the two does not appear to reduce joint pain associated with osteoarthritis or have an impact on narrowing of the joint space, according to research published online Sept. 16 in BMJ.

Abstract
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About 5 Percent of American Adults Report Vigorous Activity

FRIDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- On any given day in the United States, most adults perform mostly sedentary and light activities -- with only 5 percent reporting any vigorous activity, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Abstract
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Lung Function Tied to Diabetes and Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Restrictive impaired lung function among men without a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes appears to be associated with fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and incident type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the September issue of Diabetes Care.

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Most in Asian Malay Group With Diabetes Have Poor BP Control

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- More than 75 percent of an Asian Malay population with diabetes has poor glycemic and blood pressure (BP) control, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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High Cortisol Levels Associated With Cardiovascular Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of cortisol strongly predict cardiovascular death, even in people without pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to research published online Aug. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Depression Management Program Effective in Long Term

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Chronically depressed patients with persistent symptoms can benefit significantly over the long term from a program of low-intensity depression disease management, according to a study in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Insufficient Sleep May Lower Insulin Sensitivity

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- One week's sleep restriction decreases insulin sensitivity significantly in healthy subjects, raising questions about the effect chronic short sleep duration could have on insulin resistance-related disease processes, according to research published in the September issue of Diabetes.

Abstract
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Lowest Dose of Aspirin Reduces Colorectal Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Regular use of low-dose aspirin appears to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the general population, which is evident after just five years of use, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in Gut.

Abstract
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Anemia Therapy in Diabetes Patients With CKD Carries Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), type 2 diabetes, and anemia treated with an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) who have a poor initial response are at higher risk for cardiovascular events and death than better-responding patients, according to a study in the Sept. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Myelofibrosis Drug Associated With Clinical Benefit

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK2 inhibitor appears to be an effective targeted treatment for advanced myelofibrosis, according to research published in the Sept. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Research IDs Frequent-Exacerbation COPD Phenotype

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), irrespective of disease severity, appear to fall within a susceptibility phenotype, according to research published in the Sept. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Krystexxa Approved for Gout

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Krystexxa (pegloticase) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for adults with gout who do not respond to, or who cannot tolerate, standard treatments.

National Library of Medicine

Physician Characteristics Poor Predictors of Quality of Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Few characteristics of individual physicians are related to higher performance on quality measures, according to a study in the Sept. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. According to another study in the same issue, many patients perceive diagnostic and treatment mistakes by their physicians, and these perceptions often lead patients to seek another physician.

Abstract - Reid
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Switching to Prasugrel May Help ACS Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who take maintenance clopidogrel after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event appear to have a further reduction in platelet function if they switch to prasugrel, according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Distressed Personality Tied to Cardiovascular Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Type D (distressed) personality, a general propensity to distress defined by high "negative affectivity" and "social inhibition" scores, has adverse effects on cardiovascular outcomes, according to research published in the September issue of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Sampling Restrictions Alter Prescribing Behavior Modestly

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a policy restricting drug sampling and pharmaceutical industry detailing in a small rural clinic resulted in modest reductions in the prescription of branded and promoted drugs, according to research published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Adherence Low for Colorectal Cancer Screening Program

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to biennial fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) to detect signs of colorectal cancer (CRC) was low among members of a Washington State health plan, which potentially compromised its effectiveness in reducing CRC mortality, according to a study in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Routine PSA Screening Does Not Cut Prostate Cancer Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Routine prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening does not ultimately reduce prostate cancer deaths, but a single PSA test at age 60 may identify men at higher risk of developing and dying from the disease, according to a pair of studies published online Sept. 14 in BMJ.

Abstract - Djulbegovic
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Participatory Decision Making May Help Diabetes Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Participatory decision making (PDM), in which patients actively participate in their medical encounter, appears to increase medication adherence and improve hemoglobin A1c and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Depression, Burnout Have Dire Impact on Medical Training

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Depressed medical students are more likely to endorse depression stigma attitudes than nondepressed students, and those with burnout are more likely to engage in unprofessional conduct and less likely to hold altruistic views of physicians' social responsibilities than those without burnout, according to two articles published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Schwenk
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Sacrifice Makes Industry Gifts Seem More Acceptable

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Residents who are reminded of the sacrifices they made to attain their medical education tend to rate the acceptability of industry-sponsored gifts higher than those who are not reminded, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Researchers Identify Variables Tied to Med Student Outcomes

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Race/ethnicity, debt load, and admissions test score all appear to have an impact on a medical student's likelihood of graduating from medical school and passing the licensing exams, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Availability Bias Has Role in Residents' Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- When second-year medical residents use non-analytic reasoning and are faced with cases similar to others they recently dealt with, they are more likely to make errors related to availability bias; however, subsequent application of diagnostic reflection may counteract this bias and improve diagnostic accuracy in both first- and second-year residents, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Long-Term NSAID Use Ups Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with an increased risk of chronic atrial fibrillation (AF), according to research published in the Sept. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. According to a second study published in the same issue, using combinations of anticoagulants -- as opposed to warfarin alone -- significantly raises the risk of bleeding events in patients with AF.

Abstract - De Caterina
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Abstract - Hansen
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African-Americans May Be Reluctant Blood Donors

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- African-Americans are less likely to donate blood because of a general distrust of the health care system, according to research conducted at African-American churches in Atlanta and published online Sept. 14 in Transfusion.

Abstract
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Cilostazol As Good As Aspirin for Stroke Prevention

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The antiplatelet drug cilostazol is non-inferior, and possibly superior, to aspirin for secondary stroke prevention, and is associated with fewer hemorrhagic events, according to research from the second Cilostazol Stroke Prevention Study (CSPS 2) published online Sept. 11 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Osteoporosis Drugs Linked to Rare but Serious Thigh Breaks

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of bisphosphonates, a medication class widely prescribed for osteoporosis, may be associated with atypical and serious thigh bone fractures, according to the report of a professional task force published in the September issue of the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Cryotherapy Most Effective Treatment for Common Warts

TUESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- To cure common warts, cryotherapy is more effective than topical salicylic acid, but for plantar warts, neither treatment is significantly more effective than simply taking a wait-and-see approach, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
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Primary Care-Based Lifestyle Intervention Can Be Successful

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A sustained three-year program involving supervised exercise, dietary counseling, and regular group meetings can cost-effectively increase quality of life (QOL) for those at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to research published in the Sept. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Immigrants Have Poorer Health Care Access in U.S. and Canada

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Foreign-born immigrants in both the United States and Canada have poorer access to health care than do native-born citizens of both countries, according to research published online Sept. 1 in Health Services Research.

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Re-Consent Important Before Secondary Use of Genetic Data

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Most research participants want to be asked for secondary consent -- referred to as re-consent -- before their existing personal genetic data are added to the federal database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics.

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If Baseline PSA <2, Further Screening May Not Be Beneficial

MONDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Men with low baseline levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at ages 55 to 74 are unlikely to have a survival benefit from additional screening or treatment of prostate cancers, according to research published online Sept. 13 in Cancer.

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Unfit Men With Long Hours Have Higher Cardiac Death Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with men who work less than 40 hours per week, men with low physical fitness working more than 45 hours per week are at increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality, but this is not the case for men with intermediate or high fitness levels who work long hours, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Heart.

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Physical Ability Measures Predict Death Risk in Elderly

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Community-dwelling elderly people with poor performance on objective measures of physical capability are at higher risk of death than those who perform better, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 9 in BMJ.

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Stenting for Carotid Stenosis Unsafe for Older Adults

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Stenting for treatment of carotid stenosis should be avoided in patients 70 years of age or older, but the approach appears to be as safe as endarterectomy in patients younger than 70, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 10 in The Lancet.

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High-Quality Primary Care Tied to Improved Health Outcomes

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Higher-quality coronary heart disease (CHD) care among general practices in the United Kingdom is associated with lower CHD admissions and mortality rates, with the association strongest among practices serving populations with high levels of deprivation, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Risk Factors in Older Adults for Indoor and Outdoor Falls Differ

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Among community-dwelling older adults, the risk factors for indoor falls differ from those for outdoor falls, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Fruit and Vegetable Intake Far Below National Targets

FRIDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In 2009, fruit and vegetable consumption among U.S. adults was far below Healthy People 2010 targets, according to a report published in the Sept. 10 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Stroke Recurrence and Severity Higher in Mexican Americans

THURSDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Mexican Americans (MAs) with atrial fibrillation who experience ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are at a higher risk of stroke recurrence and more severe recurrences than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), but all-cause mortality appears to be similar between the two groups, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in Stroke.

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Perioperative Stroke Rare but Deadly in Joint Replacement

THURSDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Though rare, perioperative stroke following joint replacement has a high rate of both mortality and morbidity, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Back Injury Patients Adjust Seated-Task Torso Movement

THURSDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- People with spinal cord injury (SCI) and low back pain (LBP) may adjust the movement of their torsos while executing seated tasks to compensate for lack of balance in the former group and to minimize pain in the latter group, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

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Annual Medical Liability Costs Surpass $50 Billion

THURS

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