Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Oncology | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

February 2010 Briefing - Oncology

Last Updated: March 01, 2010.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Oncology for February 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Personalized Tumor Biomarkers Monitor Treatment Efficacy

FRIDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Personalized tumor-specific biomarkers based on the chromosomal rearrangements present in an individual patient can be detected with high sensitivity in blood and used to monitor the efficacy of treatment in cancer patients, according to a study in the Feb. 24 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Outcomes Similar for Open and Laparoscopic Prostate Surgery

FRIDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Men with prostate cancer have similar postoperative complications and need for additional treatment regardless of whether they undergo radical prostatectomy by an open or laparoscopic procedure, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Removing Opposite Breast Improves Survival Slightly

FRIDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Prophylactic removal of the opposite breast has a slight survival benefit in younger women with early-stage estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Role of Diet in Bladder Cancer Patient Care Assessed

THURSDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Certain foods are associated with an increased or a decreased risk of bladder cancer, and diet should be a component of care for patients with the disease, according to an article published in the February issue of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Treating H. Pylori Bacteria Effective for Gastric Lymphoma

THURSDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in the stomachs of patients with early-stage gastric lymphoma results in the remission of approximately 75 percent of them, according to a meta-analysis reported in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Annual Colonoscopy Helpful for High-Risk Cancer Group

THURSDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Annual colonoscopies can provide timely detection of early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC) in the high-risk group of people with the genetic condition known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), according to a study in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Combination Procedure May Be Best for Endometrial Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In endometrial cancer patients at high risk of recurrence, combined pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy reduces the risk of recurrence significantly better than systemic pelvic lymphadenectomy, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamin D Receptor Inhibitors Block Prostate Cancer Growth

THURSDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists can reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells containing a common, androgen-regulated, growth-promoting gene fusion, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Model Predicts Risk of Prostate Cancer After Negative Biopsy

THURSDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A model that takes changes in risk factors over time into account can predict who is at high risk of developing prostate cancer among men whose biopsies are initially negative, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lasofoxifene Examined in Postmenopausal Women

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The nonsteroidal selective estrogen-receptor modulator lasofoxifene may reduce the risk of fractures, stroke, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, and coronary heart disease in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. However, the drug significantly increases the risk of venous thromboembolic events, according to a study in the Feb. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Nephron-Sparing Surgery Viable Option in Kidney Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Nephron-sparing surgery confers the same degree of cancer control as radical nephrectomy when treating T1bN0M0 renal cell carcinoma, according to a study in the February issue of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Biomarkers Suboptimal for Early Liver Cancer Detection

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Two biomarkers are less effective than ultrasound in detecting early liver cancer in high-risk patients with advanced hepatitis C, according to a study in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text

Physicians Working Fewer Hours for Lower Fees

TUESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians in the United States have been working fewer hours for lower fees in the past decade, according to research published in the Feb. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Novartis Updates Exjade Prescribing Information

MONDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Novartis Oncology has alerted health care professionals about changes in the prescribing information for deferasirox (Exjade), a treatment for chronic iron overload due to blood transfusions in patients 2 years of age and older, according to a Feb. 18 safety alert issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Chemical Tags May Be Key in Metabolic Regulation

MONDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Acetylation has an important role in the regulation of metabolism, with nearly all enzymes involved in a variety of processes in the human liver found to be acetylated, according to research published in the Feb. 19 issue of Science. The researchers state these findings provide novel clues on how normal cells function and may lead to information on why normal cells turn cancerous.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Toxic Chemicals Released During Cooking Can Be Harmful

MONDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Pan-frying foods such as beefsteak produces more hazardous fumes when done over a gas stove burner than on an electric cooker, which may contribute to or cause adverse health effects, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cell-Free DNA Integrity May Serve as Marker in Kidney Cancer

MONDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Serum cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) integrity may serve as a predictive marker for the diagnosis and detection of clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC), according to a study in the February issue of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Checklists Needed to Improve Care and Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The checklists so common in aviation and many professions are underused in medicine and, if more widely adopted, would provide powerful tools to standardize care and improve patient outcomes, according to an article published Dec. 31 in Critical Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rituxan Approved for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

FRIDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Rituxan (rituximab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat a slowly progressing form of blood and bone marrow cancer known as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the agency said in a press release.

this approval

Tobacco Use Linked to HPV+ Oropharynx Cancer Recurrence

FRIDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with advanced human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (SCCOP) who achieve a complete response to chemoradiation therapy, current smokers are at higher risk of disease recurrence and tend to have worse disease-specific survival, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Adults in Utah Report Using Opioids Incorrectly

FRIDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, one-fifth of adults in Utah had been prescribed an opioid pain medication in the past year, with some respondents reporting use of these medications despite no prescription for them, according to an article in the Feb. 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

New System Aims to Improve Blood Transfusion Safety

FRIDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has started a national surveillance system to monitor adverse events in patients who receive blood transfusions, the agency has announced.

Press Release

Hormone Replacement Therapy Linked to Lung Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Older women who receive estrogen plus progestin hormone replacement therapy (HRT), especially for long periods of time, may have an increased risk of lung cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Breast Cancer Decline Linked to Hormone Therapy Decline

THURSDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The rise and fall in U.S. breast cancer rates from 1992 to 2005 mainly reflects affluent white (non-Hispanic) women initially adopting then abandoning hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of its breast cancer risk, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exercise May Lower Risk of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In previously inactive, mostly overweight, postmenopausal women, participation in a program of moderate-to-vigorous aerobic exercise may result in sex hormone changes that are associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Aspirin Use Linked to Fewer Breast Cancer Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women with breast cancer who take aspirin several days a week have a lower risk of death or recurrence, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text

Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents Safety Plan Approved

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Under a new safety plan approved Feb. 16 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, physicians will be required to provide all patients prescribed Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents (ESAs) with a Medication Guide, and to receive specific training and certification for the proper use of these agents in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

More Information

Photodynamic Therapy Found to Strengthen Rat Vertebrae

TUESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Photodynamic therapy (PDT) improves the spinal bone structure, stiffness and strength in rats and may offer a way to ablate metastatic tumor tissue and strengthen the spines of human cancer patients, according to a study in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Racial Disparities Seen in New York Surgical Patients

TUESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In New York City, minority patients are significantly less likely than Caucasians to use high-volume surgeons and hospitals when undergoing procedures with an established volume-mortality association, according to a study in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Superficial Venous Thrombosis May Herald Greater Risks

TUESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Given that many patients with superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) also have deep venous thrombosis (DVT) at presentation, and a considerable number develop thromboembolic complications in following months, SVT may be more of a concern than previously thought, according to research published in the Feb. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

NSAIDs Not Found to Affect Skin Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) does not have any effect on the risk for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), according to a California study published online Feb. 15 in the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Metastatic Prostate Cancer Mechanism Identified

MONDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An oncogene tumor-suppressor cascade may drive metastatic prostate cancer, according to research published online Feb. 14 in Nature Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

2009 H1N1-Related Deaths and Hospitalizations Examined

MONDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has provided updated estimates of the 2009 H1N1 cases, related hospitalizations and deaths, with approximately 57 million cases occurring between April 2009 and January 2010.

More Information

MRI Benefit in Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Questioned

FRIDAY, Feb. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in addition to the usual triple assessment for breast cancer diagnosis does not reduce the risk of repeat operation and is not a good use of resources, according to a study published in the Feb. 13 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Protein May Block Letrozole Therapy in Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The overexpression of low-molecular-weight cyclin E (LMW-E) in the tumors of many menopausal women with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers nullifies the effects of letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor. However, letrozole's effect can be restored by adding the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) inhibitor roscovitine to treatment, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Systemic Treatment Deemed Effective for Giant-Cell Tumor

THURSDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Denosumab, an antibody that targets cells involved in bone destruction, is the first systemic treatment shown to be effective in treating giant-cell tumor, a rare osteolytic tumor that can metastasize to the lung, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Laparoscopic Practice Takes Physical Toll on Surgeons

THURSDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Many surgeons who perform laparoscopic surgery suffer pain, numbness, stiffness, fatigue and other physical symptoms, often as a result of high case load, according to a study published online Dec. 24 ahead of print in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Supports Accelerated Whole-Breast Irradiation

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Whole-breast irradiation spread over fewer days (accelerated, hypofractionated radiation) following breast-conserving surgery for cancer appears non-inferior to standard radiation treatment, according to research published in the Feb. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. This adds to a study recently released Online First in The Lancet Oncology, which showed that hypofractionated radiotherapy for breast cancer patients may provide a better quality of life with no evidence of an increase in adverse effects.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Reducing Skin Toxicity During Cancer Treatment Studied

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Preemptive treatment reduces the development of high-grade skin toxicity (the most common adverse event observed with inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor) by more than half in patients with colorectal cancer receiving panitumumab-containing therapy, according to a study published online Feb. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Better Quality of Life Linked to Hypofractionated Radiation Doses

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Radiation given as fewer but larger doses (hypofractionated radiotherapy) is associated with better quality of life than the standard treatment of more lower doses in women with early-stage breast cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 8 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

AHRQ: U.S. Adults Seeing Big Barriers to Specialty Care

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In 2007, about one in 13 of U.S. adults reported that access to specialist care was a "big problem," according to a December report issued by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Full Text

FDA Initiative Aims to Cut Medical Radiation Exposure

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has launched a new initiative that aims to reduce exposure to radiation from computed tomography (CT), nuclear medicine studies and fluoroscopy, the three procedures that are the main sources of medically-related radiation exposure.

Press Release
More Information

Tamoxifen Treatment Linked to Worse Cognitive Function

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women with breast cancer have worse cognitive function after treatment with tamoxifen but not exemestane, according to a study published online Feb. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pathway Activation Profiles Linked to Cancer Survival

TUESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particular oncogenic pathway activation profiles are associated with recurrence-free survival, and these profiles vary depending on the age and gender of the individual, according to research published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Research Points to Threat in Thirdhand Tobacco Smoke

TUESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Nicotine left on surfaces from tobacco smoke can combine with ambient nitrous oxide to create carcinogens, raising new concern over the health effects of so-called thirdhand smoke, according to research published online Feb. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text

Paroxetine May Compromise the Efficacy of Tamoxifen

TUESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Women with breast cancer who take tamoxifen and the antidepressant paroxetine (Paxil), which has been hypothesized to reduce the effectiveness of tamoxifen, may be at higher risk of dying of breast cancer, according to research published online Feb. 8 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Reimbursement Changes in Office Endoscopies Studied

TUESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A 2005 increase in Medicare reimbursement to encourage office-based endoscopic surgeries for bladder cancer instead of more costly hospital surgeries had the unintended effect of disproportionately increasing in-office procedures and driving up Medicare costs, according to a study published online Feb. 8 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

CD Increases Knowledge, Comfort With Genetic Testing

TUESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A CD-based educational aid can increase knowledge of and comfort with genetic testing in patients at high risk of developing cancer, and may facilitate informed consent, according to a study published online Feb. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fewer States Preempting Local Smoke-Free Rules

MONDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Some progress has been made on the Healthy People 2010 goal of eliminating state laws which enable states to preempt local restrictions on smoke-free areas that are more stringent than state laws, according to an article published in the Feb. 5 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Soft Drinks Linked to Pancreatic Cancer in Chinese

MONDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming two or more soft drinks per week may be associated with a higher risk of pancreatic cancer in middle-aged and elderly Chinese individuals, although results from previous studies in primarily Caucasian populations have been mixed, according to a study in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Economic Status Linked to Anxiety, Depression in Cancer

MONDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Women with low socioeconomic status (SES) who are diagnosed with breast cancer are likely to suffer higher levels of anxiety and depression than women with medium or high SES, according to a study published online Feb. 8 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

H1N1 Vaccination Still Highly Recommended

MONDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Despite H1N1 virus levels stabilizing, transmission remains an issue and vaccination continues to be an effective option for prevention of this potentially serious condition, according to a Feb. 5 press briefing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

More Information

Few Women Taking Tamoxifen to Prevent Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Well below 1 percent of American women without a personal history of breast cancer have been taking tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer in the past decade, according to a report in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Behavioral Health Factors Linked to HPV Vaccination

MONDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Certain behavioral health factors may potentially be associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptability, according to research published in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many American Adults Do Not Get Recommended Vaccines

MONDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although most parents ensure their children are vaccinated, adults often do not receive recommended vaccinations themselves, according to a new report, Adult Immunization: Shots to Save Lives.

More Information

Physical Inactivity, Not Just Lack of Exercise, Harms Health

FRIDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Sedentary behavior and a lack of whole-body movement are independent predictors of increased mortality and increased incidence of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer, regardless of level of physical exercise, according to an article published online Feb. 4 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Coalition Launches Campaign to Limit Residents' Hours

FRIDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- To prevent medical errors caused by doctor fatigue, a coalition of public interest and patient safety groups is urging the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) to limit the amount of time residents must work without sleep to 16 hours and to increase resident supervision.

www.wakeupdoctor.org
More Information

Study Assesses Survival in Patients With Liver Disease

FRIDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have a higher risk of death than the general population, according to research published in the February issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Many African-Americans Do Not Protect Skin From the Sun

FRIDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Many African-Americans are not protecting their skin from sun damage, with less than a third always using even one form of sun protection, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

Health Care Spending Makes Record Leap in GDP Share

THURSDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A growth in health spending in 2009, coupled with a sagging economy, created the largest one-year jump in health care's share of the nation's gross domestic product since 1960, according to an article published online Feb. 4 in Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text

Diversity Growth Incremental in the Medical Professions

THURSDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- One hundred years after the Flexner Report recommended closing five of the seven African-American medical schools then extant, African-Americans and other minorities remain grossly underrepresented in the medical professions, according to an article in the February issue of Academic Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Not All Terminally Ill Receive Desired End-of-Life Care

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Most terminally ill patients receive end-of-life care consistent with their stated preferences, and are more likely to receive the care they prefer if they have discussed their preferences with a physician, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vendors of Imaging Equipment Urged to Allow Tracked Exposure

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the increasing exposure to diagnostic radiation, vendors of imaging equipment should allow tracking of radiation exposure, according to an opinion article in the February Journal of the American College of Radiology. A related opinion in the same issue notes that diagnostic radiation exposure has the potential to harm not only the individual but also future generations through processes such as epigenetics.

Full Text - Neumann (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text - Farooki (subscription or payment may be required)

Role of Artemin in Endometrial Cancer Investigated

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Endometrial tumors that produce high levels of artemin are more oncogenic and invasive, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

The Lancet Retracts Study Linking MMR Vaccine, Autism

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- On Feb. 2, The Lancet retracted a controversial 1998 study that linked the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism and gastrointestinal problems.

Retraction

Symptoms Poor Predictors of Ovarian Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a recent consensus statement encouraging use of certain symptoms in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, symptoms such as abdominal pain or urinary urgency are poor predictors of the disease, particularly early-stage disease, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Cardiac Risk Link Assessed

TUESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to treat prostate cancer may be associated with cardiovascular risk, according to an article published online Feb. 1 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text

Extended Use of Nicotine Patch Linked to Benefits

TUESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The use of transdermal nicotine patches for an extended duration, compared to the standard eight-week therapy, may improve the chances of smoking abstinence, according to research published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Late Mortality May Be Decreasing in Childhood Cancer Survivors

TUESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Late mortality among five-year survivors of childhood cancer has dropped significantly in the past few decades, largely due to fewer deaths from recurrence or progression, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In a related study in the same issue, researchers report that the expression of 34 genes predicts outcomes in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

Abstract - Armstrong
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Davicioni
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Estrogen Levels Linked to Breast Cancer Gene Expression

TUESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Plasma estrogen levels are correlated with the expression of estrogen-dependent genes in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

President Proposes $911 Billion Budget for HHS

TUESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- As part of his 2011 budget proposal, President Barack Obama has proposed $911 billion for the U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS) Department, according to a Feb. 1 announcement by the secretary of HHS, Kathleen Sebelius.

More Information

Partial Nephrectomy Use Low for Renal Cell Carcinoma

MONDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The use of laparoscopic radical nephrectomy may have reduced the use of partial nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma, according to research published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Transplant Type Found to Have No Effect on Leukemia Survival

MONDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In leukemia patients, long-term survival rates are similar in those who were transplanted with either peripheral blood stem cells or bone marrow, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

BMI Thresholds May Be Too Restrictive for Older Adults

MONDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index thresholds are too restrictive for older adults, who are at no greater risk of mortality if they are overweight versus normal weight, according to a study in the February issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text

Approval Expanded for Breast Cancer Drug Tykerb

MONDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded approval for Tykerb (lapatinib) to include postmenopausal women with hormone- and HER2-positive advanced breast cancer who require hormone therapy.

more

Copyright © 2010 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: February 2010 Briefing - Radiology Next: Acupuncture May Reduce Depression During Pregnancy

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.