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Phone Counseling Improved Diet During Prostate Cancer

Last Updated: September 16, 2008.

 

Men's consumption of tomatoes, crucifers rose over six months, which might reduce progression

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Telephone-based dietary counseling is effective in increasing vegetable consumption and lowering fat intake in men with prostate cancer, according to research published in the September issue of Urology.

TUESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Telephone-based dietary counseling is effective in increasing vegetable consumption and lowering fat intake in men with prostate cancer, according to research published in the September issue of Urology.

J. Kellogg Parsons, M.D., of the University of California San Diego, and colleagues analyzed data from 74 men with prostate adenocarcinoma, aged 50 to 80, who were randomized to receive either six months of a counseling intervention -- which promoted seven daily servings of vegetables, two servings of whole grains, and a serving of beans or legumes -- or standardized print materials.

Based on dietary recalls at baseline and six months, daily intakes in the intervention arm of total vegetables, crucifers, tomato products and beans/legumes increased by 76, 143, 292 and 95 percent, respectively, and fat intake fell by 12 percent, the researchers report. No significant changes were seen in the control arm. Plasma carotenoid concentrations increased by 26 percent in the men in the intervention arm, and rose only by a non-significant amount in the control group, the investigators found.

"Our results do not prove that changes in diet and plasma carotenoid concentrations will necessarily alter the natural history of prostate cancer; however, given the extensive observational and preclinical data to support a prominent role for diet in prostate cancer carcinogenesis, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the dietary change components of [the Men's Eating and Living study] will decrease disease progression," the authors write.

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