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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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September 2008 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: October 01, 2008.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for September 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

News Media Under-Report Drug Company Funding of Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Reports on medication research published in general news media often fail to disclose that the research received pharmaceutical company funding and frequently refer to drugs by brand name rather than using the generic name, according to an article published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Excess Prenatal Testosterone Negatively Impacts Males

TUESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Excess testosterone exposure during pregnancy reduces the reproductive health of male offspring in sheep, according to a report first released online July 31, in advance of publication in an upcoming issue of Endocrinology.

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Biventricular Assist Device Shows Promise in Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The use of biventricular assist devices may be an effective method for sustaining small children awaiting heart transplantation, according to research published Sept. 30 in a supplement issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Psychotropic Drug Use in Youths Varies Across Countries

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment patterns of psychotropic medication in children and adolescents vary widely between the United States, the Netherlands and Germany, according to an article in the Sept. 25 issue of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health.

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Flu Vaccination Rises in Adults But Still Low in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- During the 2006-2007 flu season, influenza vaccination coverage increased among adults, but only one in five children aged 6 months to 23 months were fully vaccinated, according to two reports from researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Early Dietary Fish Introduction May Decrease Eczema Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Introducing fish to an infant's diet before 9 months of age reduces risk of eczema, while breast-feeding does not, according to a report published online Sept. 25 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Britain's Breast-Feeding Promotion Efforts Are Failing

FRIDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.K. health care system is failing to encourage women to breast-feed, and a national breast-feeding promotion strategy is urgently required if breast-feeding rates are to improve, according to an editorial published online Sept. 25 in BMJ.

Editorial

Glucose Watch in Pregnancy Cuts Risk of Complications

FRIDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetic women whose blood sugar is continuously monitored during pregnancy are more likely to have better glycemic control in the third trimester, and their babies have a lower birth weight and reduced risk of macrosomia, according to research published Sept. 25 in BMJ Online First.

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Community-Based Education Can Halve Neonatal Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A community-based behavior modification program was able to reduce neonatal mortality by more than half in a rural setting in India, researchers report in the Sept. 27 issue of The Lancet.

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Race May Affect Labor Induction Rates

THURSDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal race is associated with induction of labor, with rates increasing disproportionately among non-African American women, according to the results of a study published in the September issue of Medical Care.

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Childhood Cancer Survivors Face Increased Mortality Risks

THURSDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adolescent cancer survivors may continue to face the risk of increased morbidity and mortality due to recurrence of their original cancer, researchers report in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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High-Caffeine Drinks Pose Growing Health Hazard

THURSDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The growing popularity of high-caffeine content energy drinks has resulted in an increasing number of reports of caffeine intoxication, and an increase in the combined use of caffeine and alcohol, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

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Abortion Rate in America at 30-Year Low

THURSDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of women in America seeking abortion hit a 30-year low in 2004, but this trend masks disparities in abortion rates across various demographic groups, according to a report published in August by the Guttmacher Institute.

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Media Firestorm Over Pediatric Statins Misses the Point

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- When the American Academy of Pediatrics released revised recommendations for the management of hypercholesterolemia in children this year, a media firestorm erupted over the inclusion of statins as potential first-line pharmacologic agents. But the epidemic of childhood obesity has forced pediatricians to balance the unknown risks associated with pharmacologic therapy in children against the risk that failure to treat could lead to heart attacks and other complications in young adulthood, according to a Perspective article published in the Sept. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Nasal Insulin Doesn't Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in At-Risk Kids

TUESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prophylactic administration of nasal insulin soon after birth does not prevent children with HLA genotypes and autoantibodies from developing type 1 diabetes, nor does it delay onset of the disease, according to research published online Sept. 23 in The Lancet.

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Parents Make Decisions Based on Hope, Not Science

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of babies who die as a result of extreme prematurity or potentially lethal congenital abnormalities report that religion, spirituality and hope guided their decisions about resuscitation rather than the physician's predictions about morbidity and death, according to an article published in the September issue of Pediatrics.

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No Change to 2009 Part B Medicare Premium

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- There will be no change to the Part B Standard Medicare premium in 2009 compared with 2008. This is the first time since 2000 that the premium has not risen over the prior year, according to an announcement by the Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

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Mutation Linked to Leukemia in Down Syndrome

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- About a fifth of Down syndrome patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) protein, according to a report published online Sept. 20 in The Lancet.

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Editorial

Childhood Paracetamol Use Linked to Later Asthma Symptoms

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The use of paracetamol (acetaminophen), whether in the first year of life or later in childhood, is associated with higher risk of asthma symptoms at ages 6 and 7, according to research published in the Sept. 20 issue of The Lancet.

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Measuring Exhaled NO Adds Little to Asthma Treatment

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Regularly measuring fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) didn't lead to improvement in asthma symptoms or lung function in young patients with asthma, according to research published in the Sept. 20 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial

Call for Expansion of Congenital Disorders Screening

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Screening all newborns for a panel of 29 disorders recommended by the American College of Medical Genetics would help detect significantly more children with rare disorders, according to a report published in the Sept. 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Several Risk Factors Linked to Adult-Onset Asthma

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Factors associated with asthma diagnosed in adulthood include persistent wheezing in early life, bronchial hyper-responsiveness at 6 years of age, and allergic or non-allergic rhinitis in adulthood, according to the results of two studies published in the Sept. 20 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract - Stern
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Abstract - Shaaban
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Antibiotic Resistance Has Become a Global Pandemic

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A concerted international and national response, behavior change by consumers and providers, and the development of antibacterial agents are all urgently needed to tackle the global problem of rapidly increasing antibiotic resistance, according to an article published online Sept. 18 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Timing of C-Section Perioperative Antibiotics Compared

THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative antibiotics significantly reduce postpartum endometritis compared to antibiotics given at cord clamping, but do not affect neonatal outcomes, according to research published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Spanish Speakers in America Face Barriers to Health Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Spanish-speaking Hispanics in America have less access to health care, while immigrant children are increasingly uninsured and disparities along the border with Mexico are a persistent problem, according to three studies published online Sept. 17 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract -DuBard
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Abstract - Pati
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Abstract - Bastida
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Antibiotics Questioned in Spontaneous Preterm Labor

THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Women who go into spontaneous preterm labor without ruptured membranes and no obvious signs of infection should not receive antibiotics because it may increase their children's subsequent risk of functional impairments and cerebral palsy, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in The Lancet.

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Maternal Vaccine Reduces Influenza in Infants

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The use of influenza vaccine in pregnant women can decrease the risk of influenza in their infants up to six months of age and offer protection against febrile respiratory illness in both mothers and infants, according to research published online Sept. 17 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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MRI Improves Diagnosis in Children with Hearing Loss

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- An abnormal cochlea and abnormal cochlear nerve are the most common inner ear abnormalities in sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and inner ear abnormalities are more common among patients with severe and profound SNHL and in children with unilateral hearing loss, according to a report in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Absent Nasal Bone Helps Predict Down Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- While absent nasal bone and increased nuchal folds are both markers for Down syndrome, nasal bone hypoplasia is a more efficient test, according to a report in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Pathogens May Play Role in Sudden Infant Deaths

MONDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus found in normally sterile sites in cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) may be a contributor that should be considered in determining the cause of death, according to research published online Sept. 15 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Surgery May Benefit Some Epileptic Children

MONDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Up to 30 percent of epileptic children have medically refractory epilepsy and may benefit from surgery, according to a review published in the September issue of Neurosurgical Focus.

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Newer Schizophrenia Drugs May Have Metabolic Side Effects

MONDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Second-generation, or atypical, antipsychotic drugs used to treat children and adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder are not necessarily superior to first-generation drugs, according to an article published online Sept. 15 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Maternal Factors Linked to Likelihood of Spanking

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers with depression or exposure to partner violence are more likely to spank their children, according to research published online Sept. 11 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Community Participation Key to Maternal and Child Health

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Community participation is vital for the successful delivery of maternal, newborn and child health, according to three articles published in the Sept. 13 issue of The Lancet, which has a special focus on the legacy of the 1978 International Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata.

Abstract - Rosato
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Abstract - Bhutta
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Abstract - Ekman
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Chronic Disease Is Heavy Burden in Developing World

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although many countries have made significant progress in reducing mortality, the burden of chronic and non-communicable disease remains heavy and requires integrated strategies to tackle it, according to three papers published in the Sept. 13 issue of The Lancet, which has a special focus on the legacy of the 1978 International Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata.

Abstract - Tollman
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Abstract - Lawn
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Abstract - Beaglehole
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Editorial

Primary Care Offers Lifeline to Global Health

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Achieving the Millennium Development Goals requires a renewed commitment to primary health care, while training health care workers and developing meaningful measures of progress are of key importance, according to three papers published in the Sept. 13 issue of The Lancet, which has a special focus on the legacy of the 1978 International Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata.

Abstract - Huicho
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Comment - Loaiza
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Parents May Overestimate Kids' Physical Activity Levels

THURSDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a parental questionnaire to assess children's physical activity in the United Kingdom appears to dramatically overestimate their true activity levels, according to research published online Sept. 9 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Survival Rising for Several Child Hematologic Cancers

THURSDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The past two decades have seen considerable improvement in survival of several common childhood hematologic malignancies, according to research published in the Sept. 17 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Helps Children Handle Trauma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavioral therapy in groups and individually can help children and teens overcome trauma symptoms, such as depressive disorders, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, according to study findings published in the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Smoking Cessation Services Fail to Attract Young People

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking cessation services fail to attract young people and have only a modest impact on smoking behavior among the young, according to an editorial published online Sept. 10 in BMJ.

Editorial

Limiting School Sodas May Have Low Consumption Impact

TUESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Access to soft drinks in elementary schools may have a relatively small effect on children's overall consumption, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Continuous Monitoring Helps Glycemic Control in Diabetics

MONDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with type 1 diabetes whose glucose levels are continuously monitored achieve better glycemic control than those who do not, but there are still barriers to overcome in continuously monitoring children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, according to a report published online Sept. 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Metabolic Syndrome Has Adverse Effects on Teens' Hearts

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Among adolescents aged 14 to 20 years, those with the metabolic syndrome have a higher risk of developing heart problems than those without the metabolic syndrome, according to the results of a study of American Indian teens published in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Editorial

Physical, Sexual Abuse Linked to Asthma in Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Puerto Rican children are more likely to have asthma if they have been a victim of physical or sexual abuse, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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UK Doctors Need Better Guidelines on Child Protection

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors involved in child protection cases in the United Kingdom may find that they are caught between their duty of care to the child and their legal requirement to seek parents' consent to treatment, according to an editorial published online Sept. 4 in BMJ.

Editorial

Vaccination Coverage Remains High for US Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Over 77 percent of young children in the United States are fully vaccinated according to the recommended series of vaccines, and all but one of the individual vaccines have at least 90 percent coverage, according to a report published in the Sept. 5 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Review Finds No Link Between Montelukast, Suicide

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Although media reports have questioned a link between montelukast use and suicide, three randomized trials didn't find that reduced emotional well-being is an adverse effect of the drug, according to a review published online Aug. 29 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Low Birth Weight Problems Persist Through School Age

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Psychiatric problems related to low birth weight extend throughout the period of school attendance, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Patterns of Non-Family Infant Abductions Are Changing

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The profile of non-family infant abductions is changing, with fewer babies being taken from hospitals and more from homes and public places, according to a report published in the September issue of the American Journal of Nursing.

Abstract
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Prenatal Cigarette Smoke Leads to Breathing Difficulties

THURSDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Preterm infants born to smoking mothers, which increases their risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), have defects in oxygen saturation and recovery after breathing pauses during hypoxia, according to study findings published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Potential Vaccine Reactions Call for Reasoned Approach

THURSDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluating possible vaccine-related hypersensitivity reactions -- which are a relatively common clinical problem -- is the first step for health care providers to take in minimizing future problems in these patients, according to an article in the September issue of Pediatrics.

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In Some Cases, Vaccination Needles May Be Too Long

THURSDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recommended needle lengths for children's vaccinations pose a considerable risk for overpenetration, according to research in the September issue of Pediatrics.

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Many Youth Rwandan Heads of Household Depressed

THURSDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Orphaned youths heading households in Rwanda report high levels of depression and are more likely to feel depressed if feeling hunger, grief or socially marginalized, having few assets, or being in poor health, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

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Ibuprofen First Reduces Fever in Children for Longer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- When treating children for fever, ibuprofen is more effective than paracetamol (acetaminophen) in terms of the time without fever within the first four hours of treatment, while a combination of both drugs works best over the first 24 hours, according to research published Sept. 2 in BMJ Online First.

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Paternal Age May Influence Bipolar Risk in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Children of older fathers may have a higher risk of bipolar disorder, and family-focused therapy along with medication is effective in treating bipolar-related depression in adolescents, according to the results of two studies published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Frans
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Abstract - Miklowitz
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Birth Weight Linked to Blood Pressure in Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Birth weight is associated with systolic blood pressure and rate of growth is associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adulthood, according to the results of a study of young adults published online Sept. 2 in Hypertension.

Abstract
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Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Linked to Anaphylaxis Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- While the risk of anaphylaxis was higher in a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program compared to a similar program for meningococcal vaccination, HPV vaccination is remarkably safe, according to an article published online Sept. 1 in CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Journal.

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Three Questions Can Screen for Postnatal Depression

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Postpartum depression can be reliably diagnosed using just three questions in a primary care setting, according to the results of a study published online Sept. 1 in Pediatrics.

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Recommended Treatments Issued for Cerumen Impaction

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health care providers should treat symptomatic cerumen impactions or impactions that inhibit a clinical exam of the ear, according to the clinical practice guideline issued by the American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, published in the September issue of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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American Hospitals Sending New Mothers Mixed Messages

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Most hospitals in eastern U.S. states give samples of baby formula to new mothers when they are discharged, according to a report published in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Many Parents Unaware of California Family Leave Program

TUESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the documented need to support families with chronically ill children, California's Paid Family Leave Insurance Program has been ineffective in providing such support, possibly because many families are unaware of the program, according to a report published in the Sept. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Editorial

US Youth Suicides Trend Upward After Recent Decline

TUESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide trends among 10- to 19-year-olds in the United States declined from 1996 to 2002, but from 2003 to 2004 they spiked 18 percent and remained higher than expected in 2004 to 2005, according to a research letter published in the Sept. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Maternal Stress May Affect Childhood Obesity

TUESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- More than children who live in food insecure low-income households, younger children whose mothers are under stress are at greater risk for obesity, according to research published in the September issue of Pediatrics.

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Emotional Problems at Age 6 Associated with Preterm Birth

TUESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are born at 25 weeks' gestation or less are at elevated risk of having emotional or behavioral problems by the age of 6 years, according to research published in the September issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Active Gaming Keeps Children Burning Energy

TUESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Active video gaming can help children expend greater levels of energy than seated gaming, according to a report published in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial

Unhealthy Snacks Continue to Be Sold in US Schools

MONDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Public secondary schools continue to offer snacks and beverages that compete with more healthy U.S. Department of Agriculture school meal program items, despite recommendations from the Institute of Medicine to restrict the availability of unhealthy competitive foods in schools, according to an article published in the Aug. 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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