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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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November 2008 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: December 01, 2008.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for November 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Serotonin Production in Gut Controls Bone Formation

FRIDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A gene that controls the production of serotonin in the gut is an important regulator of bone formation, according to a study in the Nov. 28 issue of Cell.

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Undercooked Pot Pies Linked to Salmonella Outbreak

FRIDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Failure to cook not-ready-to-eat frozen foods caused a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella infections during 2007, according to a report published Nov. 28 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Financial Burden Hits Patients with Diabetes Diagnosis

FRIDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The additional medical costs of diabetes, on top of medical expenses associated with aging, are $158 a year, and will cost a newly diagnosed 50-year-old in the United States an extra $4,174 in medical expenditures versus his or her counterpart without diabetes, according to an article published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Hazardous Toys Still on Shelves This Holiday Season

FRIDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the passing of an updated Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act in August this year, many toys that contain hazardous materials are still on toy store shelves, according to a report released in November by the Public Interest Research Group.

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Drugs Most in Need of Research for Off-Label Uses Identified

THURSDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A list of 14 U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved medications most in need of research to determine their safety and efficacy in off-label use is published in the December issue of the journal Pharmacotherapy.

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Caffeinated Coffee Linked to Lower Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly individuals who drink at least one cup of caffeinated coffee a day have a lower risk of coronary heart disease if they have mild or better hypertension, researchers report in the Dec. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Hair Accessories Can Cause Blunt Trauma Skull Fracture

THURSDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Fashion hair accessories can become embedded in the skull of blunt trauma patients, causing skull fracture, and can be difficult to detect during radiography and computer tomography (CT) scanning, according to a paper published in the December issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.

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Religion Linked to Reduced All-Cause Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Religion was associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality, but not coronary heart disease-related morbidity and mortality, according to a study published Nov. 17 in Psychology & Health.

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Perspective Article Highlights Innovations in Primary Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Creative approaches are needed to make professional life sustainable for the country's dwindling pool of primary care doctors, according to a Perspective article published in the Nov. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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High School Students Have Mostly Positive Self-Views

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1975, positive self-views have increased among high school students but there have been small declines in their general ratings of self-competence, according to the results of a study scheduled to be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Services.

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Quack Medicines Cost Obese Patients Billions of Dollars

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- "Health foods" marketed as weight-loss aids are costing obese and overweight consumers billions of dollars for unproven results, according to an editorial published online Nov. 25 in BMJ.

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Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Prenatal Nicotine Exposure

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal nicotine exposure directly leads to early pancreatic changes and subsequent metabolic syndrome, according to a report published in the December issue of Endocrinology.

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Increasing Weight Linked to Advanced-Stage Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In postmenopausal women who are not on hormone therapy, those who are overweight or obese have higher rates of breast cancer and advanced-stage disease, but these higher rates are not primarily the result of differences in mammography use, according to an article published online Nov. 25 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Compounds Suppress Arthritis Development in Mice

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Compounds that block the binding of immune complexes can effectively block the development and progression of arthritis in mice, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in Immunology & Cell Biology.

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Higher Pneumonia Risk with Inhaled Corticosteroids

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Inhaled corticosteroid use is associated with an increased risk of pneumonia, but not mortality, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to the results of a meta-analysis published Nov. 26 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cancer Incidence, Death Rates Declining in United States

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In men, women, and most racial and ethnic populations, the incidence and death rates from all cancers combined has significantly decreased in the United States, according to a report published online Nov. 25 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Safer Drug Developed for Migraine Treatment

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- For moderate to severe migraine attacks, the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor antagonist telcagepant is safer compared with other drugs such as triptans, according to a report released online Nov. 25 in The Lancet.

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Centenarian Offspring Stay Healthy Into Their 70s

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- People in their 70s whose parents reached the age of 100 have a dramatically lower risk of heart attack, stroke and diabetes than those in their 70s whose parents had a normal life span, according to an article published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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IGF-1 No Help in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-1) does not benefit patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, according to the results of a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial published in the Nov. 25 issue of Neurology.

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Rosiglitazone Linked to Heart Risks in Elderly Diabetics

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly diabetic patients prescribed rosiglitazone are at increased risk of all-cause mortality and congestive heart failure compared with those taking pioglitazone, researchers report in the Nov. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Gasping Is Common Feature During Cardiac Arrest

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In cases of cardiac arrest, gasping or abnormal breathing is common, decreases over time, and is associated with increased survival. Because it is not a sign of recovery, bystanders and emergency medical dispatchers should not hesitate from initiating prompt resuscitation efforts when appropriate, according to a study published online Nov. 24 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Parents' Preference for Emergency Department Revealed

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Parents bring their children to the emergency department for non-urgent care rather than their primary care provider (PCP) for a variety of reasons including problems with their PCP, PCP referral, and perceived advantages to using the emergency department, according to a report released online in advance of publication in an upcoming issue of Academic Pediatrics.

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Office Blood Pressure Testing Cannot Predict Mortality

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring of patients with resistant hypertension can help predict their risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but office blood pressure measurements have no such prognostic value, according to the results of a study published in the Nov. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Follow-Up Helps Lock in Weight-Loss Program Gains

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women in rural areas are less likely to regain weight after a weight-loss program if they continue to receive counseling and support for up to a year, researchers report in the Nov. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Electronic Health Records May Reduce Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Using electronic health records may be associated with reduced malpractice claims, according to a report published in the Nov. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Some Screen-Detected Breast Cancers Regress On Their Own

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The cumulative incidence of breast cancer among women screened every two years is higher than that among women screened once after six years, implying that screening detects some invasive breast cancers that would naturally regress on their own, researchers report in the Nov. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Less-Urgent Cases Receiving Low-Quality Liver Transplants

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) organ allocation system implemented in 2002, which shifted the use of high-risk organs to patients who are least in need of a transplant, has led to an unintended consequence: a small, but significant decrease in post-transplant survival in less-urgent patients, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Asthma Overdiagnosed in Obese and Non-Obese Patients

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Almost one-third of Canadian individuals diagnosed with asthma show no evidence of the disease when closely assessed, according to the results of a study published in the Nov. 18 issue of CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association journal.

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Brain-Immune Interactions Important in Epilepsy

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Interactions between immune cells and blood vessels in the brain contribute to the pathogenesis of epilepsy, and inhibiting these interactions can reduce or prevent seizures, according to research published online Nov. 23 in Nature Medicine.

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Routine HIV Testing Recommendations Ignored

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Despite guidelines issued in 2006 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommending that all Americans aged 13 to 64 be routinely tested for HIV in all health care settings, compliance has been minimal, according to researchers who spoke at a national summit convened Nov. 19 to 21 in Washington, D.C., by the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research.

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Very Low Birth Weight Linked to Kidney Disease

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Very low birth weight and prematurity are associated with secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a glomerular disease involving scarring in the kidney that can lead to kidney failure, according to a report published online Nov. 19 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Community-Based Exercise Can Prevent Deadly Diseases

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- One of the most cost-effective ways to diminish the risk of some of the deadliest diseases might be to encourage community-based physical activity, according to study findings published in the December issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Drug Reduces Exacerbations in Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The antibiotic erythromycin is more effective than a placebo in reducing the frequency and duration of exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to study findings published in the Dec. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Smoking Trends Among US Nurses Mirror Those of Society

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The declining rates of nurses in the United States who smoke mirror the declining rates among American women in general, and most nurses who ever smoked have already quit, according to a report published in the November/December issue of Nursing Research.

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Sleep Improves Learning Performance

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Although prolonged wakefulness decreases improvements in learning, this is recovered and stabilized following a sleep period, according to research published in the November issue of Learning and Memory.

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Surveillance Needed in Wake of Vaccine Shortage, CDC Says

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A continued shortage of two vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) requires heightened Hib surveillance across the nation, according to a report published in the Nov. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Young Black Men Have Higher Central Blood Pressure

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Young black men have higher central blood pressure compared with young white men, likely due to increased central artery stiffness and reduced peripheral endothelial function, according to study findings released online Oct. 10 in advance of publication in the American Journal of Physiology Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

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Soy Isoflavones Linked to Reduced Prostate Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In men, high levels of the isoflavones genistein and equol are associated with a significantly decreased risk of localized prostate cancer, according to study findings published online Nov. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Childhood Asthma Risk Tied to Infants' Winter Virus Exposure

FRIDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The length of time between an infant's birth and the winter virus season plays a role in that infant's risk of later developing early childhood asthma, according to a study published in the Dec. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Radiation Exposures Compared in Pediatric Exam Methods

FRIDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Significant differences in radiation exposure and effective doses were noted in children undergoing voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) and radionuclide cystography (RNC), according to a report in the December issue of Radiology.

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New Screening Improves Colon Cancer Detection Sensitivity

FRIDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Primary screening for colorectal cancer using a new Finnish screening program based on experimental design has proven effective in preventing deaths in the preclinical phase, according to research published Nov. 20 in BMJ Online First.

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Statins Effective As Primary Prevention of Clinical Events

FRIDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Statins have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular mortality and other clinical events when used as a primary prevention, according to a meta-analysis published in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Resistant Hypertension Strategies Reviewed

FRIDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Resistant hypertension is a relatively common medical problem requiring careful diagnostic evaluation and optimized treatment strategies, according to an overview of the topic published in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Estrogen May Explain Cystic Fibrosis Severity in Females

FRIDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen blocks an alternate pathway for mucus clearance from the lungs in cystic fibrosis patients, possibly explaining why females have more severe disease and suggesting that estrogen blockers may be useful in treatment, according to a report published online Nov. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Anticoagulant Saves Money Compared to Standard Therapy

FRIDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The anticoagulant agent bivalirudin is an efficacious and cost-effective alternative to traditional therapy, according to the results of an economic evaluation published in the Nov. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Study Categorizes Tanners for Skin Cancer Prevention

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Among beachgoers, certain subgroups might benefit from targeted interventions aimed at promoting sun-safe practices while still allowing them to enjoy their time in the sun, according to an article published in the November issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Parental Smoking Linked to Vascular Damage in Offspring

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In utero exposure to familial tobacco smoke is associated with increased vascular damage in young adulthood that is independent of later-life risk factors, according to the results of a study published in the December issue of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Suicide Risk Increases After a Suicide Attempt

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with schizophrenia or bipolar and unipolar disorder have a strong second chance of "successful" suicide attempt, according to research published Nov. 18 in BMJ Online First.

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NEJM Editorial Criticizes South Dakota 'Script' Law

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A South Dakota law that mandates a specific discussion between physicians and women seeking abortions is a violation of the First Amendment and should be overturned, according to an editorial published online Nov. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Chinese Herb Reduces Plaque Psoriasis Lesions

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Topical application of an ointment containing the herb indigo naturalis is a safe and effective treatment for chronic plaque psoriasis, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Familiarity with Medicare Affects Access to Health Care

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare beneficiaries who have limited familiarity with the system may have more problems accessing health care, which could lead to poorer health outcomes, according to a report published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Report Details Gulf War Illness Findings, Recommendations

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- One-quarter of the 697,000 U.S. veterans of the 1991 Gulf War suffer from Gulf War illness as a direct result of neurotoxic exposure, according to a 450-page report released Nov. 17, Gulf War Illness and the Health of Gulf War Veterans: Scientific Findings and Recommendations.

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Treatments Effective Against Vertigo in Meniere's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with Meniere's disease, a common cause of otologic dizziness, are eventually free of vertigo after medical or surgical treatment, according to two studies published in the November issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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HHS Report Heralds Era of Personalized Medicine

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Recent advances in genetics and molecular-level treatments have the potential to transform health care, according to a report issued Nov. 14 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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No Decline Seen in US Smoking-Related Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Between 2000 and 2004, at least 443,000 Americans died prematurely each year from cigarette smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke compared to 438,000 such deaths that occurred each year between 1997 and 2001, according to a report in the Nov. 14 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Scan Reveals Bone Anomalies in Anorexic Females

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Anorexic adolescent females show abnormal bone structure, even in the absence of changes in bone mineral density, according to a report published in the December issue of Radiology.

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World Day Set for Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- To increase awareness of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) -- which is expected to become the world's third-leading cause of death by 2030 -- Nov. 19 has been declared World COPD Day, according to a report in the Nov. 14 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Link Seen Between Prenatal Stress and Insulin Resistance

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who were exposed to psychosocial stress during pregnancy by their mother exhibit high insulin responses and insulin resistance, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Twice Daily Ginkgo Does Not Decrease Dementia

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Supplementation with Ginkgo biloba is not effective in decreasing dementia among elderly patients with normal cognition or those with mild cognitive impairment, according to research published in the Nov. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Bevacizumab Increases Risk of Blood Clot

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Venous thromboembolism is a frequent and significant complication among cancer patients, and novel therapeutic agents such as bevacizumab may further increase these risks, researchers report in the Nov. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Investigational Drug Fails to Slow Alzheimer's Progression

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing the release of growth hormone with the investigational drug MK-677 does not slow progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to the results of a study published in the Nov. 18 issue of Neurology.

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Bednet Use Increasing Among African Children

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Although the use of insecticide-treated bednets has been increasing among African children in malaria-endemic countries, about 90 million remain unprotected, with the best coverage observed in countries providing free bednets, according to a report published online Nov. 18 in The Lancet.

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New Status Boosts Availability of Emergency Contraception

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Pharmacy availability of the emergency contraceptive Plan B in Atlanta and Philadelphia increased significantly after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved its status as a behind-the-counter drug in 2006, according to the results of a survey published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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New Guidelines for Use of Drugs for Cancer Drug Toxicity

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Updated guidelines have been published for the use of drugs to protect against chemotherapy- and radiation-associated toxicity in cancer patients, according to a special article published online Nov. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Painful Menstruation, Purging Linked to Dental Damage

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- An unusual case of dental damage due to painful menstruation shows the importance of doing a thorough examination and taking a detailed patient health and dental history, according to a case report in the November/December issue of General Dentistry.

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Breast Cancer Survival Improves with Psychological Support

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients have a better chance of survival if they are given psychological support in the form of group sessions with a psychologist, according to a report published online Nov. 17 in Cancer.

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Psychological Therapy Can Improve Diabetic Care

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of motivational enhancement and cognitive behavior therapy can cut hemoglobin A1c levels in half among poorly controlled diabetics, according to the results of a study published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Community Factors Tied to Immediate Breast Reconstruction

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Factors such as increasing population density, increasing household income and increasing portion of the community with at least some college education have a significant association with immediate reconstruction following mastectomy, according to a report published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Text Messages Can Help Children Monitor Health

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Using mobile phone short message services to help children monitor health-related behaviors shows promise as a way to harness novel technologies in improving health, according to study findings published in the November issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

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Acupuncture Touted for Low Back Pain

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture should be advocated for the treatment of chronic low back pain and included in the European Guidelines for this condition, according to a systematic review published in the November issue of Spine.

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Model Predicts Depression at One-Year Follow-Up

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A model based on a national sample of children predicts depressive outcomes at one-year follow-up and may allow primary care physicians and families to intervene with adolescents at greatest risk, according to a report in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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No Link Seen Between Meat and Small Intestinal Cancer

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of red and processed meat, per se, is not associated with an increased risk of small intestinal cancer, but high consumption of saturated fat is associated with a dramatically increased risk, according to the results of a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of Cancer Research.

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Low Back Pain May Not Be Due to Joint Arthritis

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- There is no association between facet joint osteoarthritis and low back pain, researchers report in the November issue of Spine.

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Major Healthy Life Year Disparities Seen Across Europe

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- There are wide disparities across the 25 countries of the European Union in terms of healthy life years among people at 50 years of age, according to a report published early online Nov. 17 in The Lancet.

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Exercise During Pregnancy Predicts Health Later in Life

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women who maintain weight-bearing exercise during pregnancy are able to sustain their long-term fitness and exhibit a low cardiovascular profile later in life, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Gel Pillows May Not Change Head Shape in Preterm Infants

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Gel pillows do not reduce bilateral head molding in premature infants, according to a clinical study report published in the November issue of the journal Applied Nursing Research.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Increases Cardiovascular Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Increased serum carbon monoxide (CO) levels, a marker for cardiovascular risk, are related to hypoxia during sleep in obstructive sleep apnea patients, according to a clinical study published in the November issue of the journal Chest.

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Lack of Green Areas Linked to Childhood Obesity

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Children with more access to green areas are more likely to stay near normal weight for their age and gender, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Fiber, Peppermint Oil Can Treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Fiber, antispasmodics and peppermint oil should all become first-line treatments for irritable bowel syndrome, and should not be disregarded in favor of more expensive treatments, according to research published Nov. 13 in BMJ Online First.

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Promising New Treatment for Gout

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The investigational anti-gout agent febuxostat was found to be more effective than the standard allopurinol therapy in patients with hyperuricemia and gout, according to research published in the Nov. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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H. Pylori Excluded As Cause of Iron Deficiency

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In young Bangladeshi children, successful treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection does not significantly improve iron status or reduce iron deficiency, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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COX-2 Inhibitor Fails to Reduce Lower GI Events

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, use of the COX-2 selective inhibitor etoricoxib is not associated with significant reduction in lower gastrointestinal events compared to use of the commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac, researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Cardiac Health Promotion Improves Teens' Eating Habits

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A school-based cardiac health promotion intervention aimed at black adolescents helps them to understand more about heart health, exercise more and increase their intake of fruit and vegetables, although it does not reduce systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels, according to research published in the November issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Color, Style of Nurses' Uniforms Connote Professionalism

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The color and style of nurses' uniforms have an impact on how professional nurses are perceived to be, with white uniforms conveying the strongest sense of professionalism, according to a report published in the November issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Cytarabine Ineffective Against Ewing's Sarcoma

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Intermediate doses of cytarabine are ineffective against resistant Ewing's sarcoma and are associated with hematologic toxicity, according to research published online Nov. 6 in Pediatric Blood & Cancer.

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Adalimumab Found Beneficial in Crohn's Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease, adalimumab maintenance therapy significantly reduces the risks of hospitalization and surgery, according to study findings published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Training to Improve Rapport Can Foster Latinas' Disclosure

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Training to improve communication skills, rapport building, empathy and compassion may lead to better relationships between physicians and Latina patients, researchers report in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Higher Alcohol Taxes Reduce Alcohol-Related Mortality

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Two alcohol excise rate increases almost 20 years apart both had the effect of an immediate and sustained reduction in alcohol-related mortality, according to the results of a study released online Nov. 13 in advance of publication in the January issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

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HIV-1 Vaccine Ineffective

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- An HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit cell-mediated immunity is no better than placebo in preventing HIV infection or reducing viral loads in individuals at high risk of contracting HIV, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in The Lancet.

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Inadequate Pain Relief at End of Life in Elderly Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly cancer patients often do not receive appropriate pain relief at the end of life, and about one-quarter are admitted to a hospice within days of death, according to a report published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Waist-Hip Ratio Reduction May Lower Risk of Eye Disease

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A decreased waist-hip ratio might mean less of a risk of age-related macular degeneration, suggesting a role of weight loss in preventing the onset of eye disease, according to a report published in the November issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Fast Food Industry Relies on Corn Agriculture

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Corn is primarily used to feed the cows and chickens that go into fast food, and these animals are also confined and given heavily fertilized feed, according to a report in the Nov. 18 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Peripheral Arterial Disease Linked to Increased Mortality

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Progressive peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a report published in the Nov. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Counseling Attenuates Burnout in Doctors

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term counseling may be an effective strategy to reduce emotional exhaustion in doctors, according to research published Nov. 11 in BMJ Online First.

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Fatigue a Chronic Problem for Many Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A longitudinal relationship exists between fatigue severity, impaired functioning and psychological symptoms among patients presenting to a primary care physician with a chief complaint of fatigu

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