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Category: Gynecology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2008 Briefing - OBGYN & Women’s Health

Last Updated: December 01, 2008.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for November 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Serotonin Production in Gut Controls Bone Formation

FRIDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A gene that controls the production of serotonin in the gut is an important regulator of bone formation, according to a study in the Nov. 28 issue of Cell.

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Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Prenatal Nicotine Exposure

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal nicotine exposure directly leads to early pancreatic changes and subsequent metabolic syndrome, according to a report published in the December issue of Endocrinology.

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Increasing Weight Linked to Advanced-Stage Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In postmenopausal women who are not on hormone therapy, those who are overweight or obese have higher rates of breast cancer and advanced-stage disease, but these higher rates are not primarily the result of differences in mammography use, according to an article published online Nov. 25 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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No Survival Benefit of Node Removal in Endometrial Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Pelvic systematic lymphadenectomy does not improve disease-free or overall survival rates in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer, although it can provide better surgical staging, according to a study published online Nov. 25 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Editorial

Safer Drug Developed for Migraine Treatment

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- For moderate to severe migraine attacks, the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor antagonist telcagepant is safer compared with other drugs such as triptans, according to a report released online Nov. 25 in The Lancet.

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Electronic Health Records May Reduce Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Using electronic health records may be associated with reduced malpractice claims, according to a report published in the Nov. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Some Screen-Detected Breast Cancers Regress On Their Own

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The cumulative incidence of breast cancer among women screened every two years is higher than that among women screened once after six years, implying that screening detects some invasive breast cancers that would naturally regress on their own, researchers report in the Nov. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Very Low Birth Weight Linked to Kidney Disease

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Very low birth weight and prematurity are associated with secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a glomerular disease involving scarring in the kidney that can lead to kidney failure, according to a report published online Nov. 19 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Community-Based Exercise Can Prevent Deadly Diseases

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- One of the most cost-effective ways to diminish the risk of some of the deadliest diseases might be to encourage community-based physical activity, according to study findings published in the December issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Smoking Trends Among US Nurses Mirror Those of Society

MONDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The declining rates of nurses in the United States who smoke mirror the declining rates among American women in general, and most nurses who ever smoked have already quit, according to a report published in the November/December issue of Nursing Research.

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Signaling Pathway in Basal Carcinoma of Breast Identified

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have discovered a novel signaling pathway involving proteasome targeting complexes underlying the deadly sub-type of breast cancer called basal carcinoma, according to a report published in the Nov. 15 issue of Genes and Development.

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Estrogen May Explain Cystic Fibrosis Severity in Females

FRIDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen blocks an alternate pathway for mucus clearance from the lungs in cystic fibrosis patients, possibly explaining why females have more severe disease and suggesting that estrogen blockers may be useful in treatment, according to a report published online Nov. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Race Influences Breast Cancer Screening Recall Preferences

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Women from racial and ethnic minorities may be less willing than white women to undergo recall procedures that could help detect early breast cancer, according to research published in the December issue of Radiology.

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Parental Smoking Linked to Vascular Damage in Offspring

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In utero exposure to familial tobacco smoke is associated with increased vascular damage in young adulthood that is independent of later-life risk factors, according to the results of a study published in the December issue of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Estrogen Receptor Genotype Predicts Tamoxifen Hot Flashes

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Along with menopausal status and prior chemotherapy, variants of the estrogen receptor genes can predict whether a woman is likely to experience hot flashes during tamoxifen treatment, according to study findings published online Nov. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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NEJM Editorial Criticizes South Dakota 'Script' Law

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A South Dakota law that mandates a specific discussion between physicians and women seeking abortions is a violation of the First Amendment and should be overturned, according to an editorial published online Nov. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Early Treatment of HIV-Infected Infants Beneficial

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Early antiretroviral treatment of HIV-infected infants is more effective than deferred treatment in reducing mortality and disease progression, reducing both by 75 percent, researchers report in the Nov. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Report Details Gulf War Illness Findings, Recommendations

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- One-quarter of the 697,000 U.S. veterans of the 1991 Gulf War suffer from Gulf War illness as a direct result of neurotoxic exposure, according to a 450-page report released Nov. 17, Gulf War Illness and the Health of Gulf War Veterans: Scientific Findings and Recommendations.

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Protein Examined in Human Ovarian Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For the first time, researchers have identified a protein that can induce ovarian cancer cells to cannibalize, thereby increasing the chances of patient survival, according to a report published in the Nov. 15 issue of the journal Cancer Research.

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Link Seen Between Prenatal Stress and Insulin Resistance

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who were exposed to psychosocial stress during pregnancy by their mother exhibit high insulin responses and insulin resistance, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Bariatric Surgery May Improve Pregnancy Outcome in Obese

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among women who become pregnant after bariatric surgery, both maternal and neonatal outcomes may be improved, but definitive evidence is still lacking, according to a report published in the Nov. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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New Status Boosts Availability of Emergency Contraception

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Pharmacy availability of the emergency contraceptive Plan B in Atlanta and Philadelphia increased significantly after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved its status as a behind-the-counter drug in 2006, according to the results of a survey published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Painful Menstruation, Purging Linked to Dental Damage

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- An unusual case of dental damage due to painful menstruation shows the importance of doing a thorough examination and taking a detailed patient health and dental history, according to a case report in the November/December issue of General Dentistry.

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Breast Cancer Survival Improves with Psychological Support

TUESDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients have a better chance of survival if they are given psychological support in the form of group sessions with a psychologist, according to a report published online Nov. 17 in Cancer.

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Community Factors Tied to Immediate Breast Reconstruction

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Factors such as increasing population density, increasing household income and increasing portion of the community with at least some college education have a significant association with immediate reconstruction following mastectomy, according to a report published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Editorial

Vessel Factor Loss Sensitizes Tumors to Chemotherapy

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Tumors from mice lacking a blood vessel growth factor in inflammatory cells are more sensitive to chemotherapy even though they grow faster, which may explain why anti-angiogenic treatments are often only effective when given with chemotherapy, according to an article published online Nov. 9 in Nature.

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Exercise During Pregnancy Predicts Health Later in Life

MONDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women who maintain weight-bearing exercise during pregnancy are able to sustain their long-term fitness and exhibit a low cardiovascular profile later in life, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Training to Improve Rapport Can Foster Latinas' Disclosure

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Training to improve communication skills, rapport building, empathy and compassion may lead to better relationships between physicians and Latina patients, researchers report in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Lymphedema Common in Breast Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Many survivors of breast cancer experience lymphedema or arm symptoms many years later, according to a report published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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HIV-1 Vaccine Ineffective

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- An HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit cell-mediated immunity is no better than placebo in preventing HIV infection or reducing viral loads in individuals at high risk of contracting HIV, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in The Lancet.

Abstract - Buchbinder
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Abstract - McElrath
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Editorial

New Mechanism Predicts Tamoxifen Response

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The transcription factor paired box 2 gene product (PAX2) may be a primary regulator of HER2 receptor expression and therefore a critical determinant of tamoxifen action, according to data published online Nov. 12 in Nature.

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Vitamin D, Calcium Not Linked to Lower Breast Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Calcium and vitamin D supplementation does not reduce the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to the results of a study published in the Nov. 19 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Genetic Testing Successfully Used in Clinical Practice

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians are incorporating BRCA1/2 genetic testing into their clinical practices in a manner that is consistent with established guidelines, according to the results of a national survey published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Worse Prognosis for Some Node-Negative Breast Cancers

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women with node-negative breast cancers who have amplification of the HER2 gene have a significantly worse prognosis than patients without amplification, according to research published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Non-Fasting Triglycerides Can Raise Risk of Stroke

TUESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified a direct link between non-fasting triglycerides and increased risk for ischemic stroke, according to a report published in the Nov. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Breast-Feeding Increases Lung Volume in Childhood

MONDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who are breast-fed for at least four months have enhanced lung volume later in childhood, suggesting a protective effect against airflow obstruction, according to a report published online Nov. 10 in Thorax.

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Premiums Up, Coverage Down for Medicare Part D Plans

MONDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Premiums for stand-alone Medicare Part D plans are set to rise by an average of almost 25 percent in 2009 versus 2008, while almost all plans will have a coverage gap and the lowest ever proportion will qualify for automatic enrollment for low-income subsidy beneficiaries, according to research released online by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Stillbirths, Neonatal Deaths Tied to Maternal Mental Illness

MONDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- There is an increased risk of stillbirth and neonatal death among babies born to women with mental illness, according to a report published online Nov. 10 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood -- Fetal and Neonatal Edition.

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New Guidelines for Adults with Congenital Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- New guidelines have been developed for the management of adults with congenital heart disease, and these patients have lower in-hospital death rates when operated on by pediatric heart surgeons, according to guidelines and a study published online Nov. 7 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract - Warnes
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Abstract - Karamlou
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Migraines Associated with Decreased Breast Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a history of migraines have a significantly decreased risk of developing breast cancer, according to research published in the November issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Smoking While Pregnant Raises Risk of Orofacial Clefts

FRIDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking during pregnancy raises the risk of orofacial clefts but may be associated with a reduced risk of neural tube defects, according to a report published online Nov. 6 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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Smoking During Pregnancy Affects Newborn Behavior

THURSDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Babies who are exposed to maternal smoking during pregnancy are more likely to have poor self-regulation and require greater external intervention, according to a study published online Nov. 6 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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Specialized Clinic Improves Osteoporosis Care

THURSDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- While a specialized orthopaedic osteoporosis clinic increases treatment rates, overall treatment rates among early osteoporosis patients remain suboptimal, according to a report in the November issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Testosterone May Lift Libido in Postmenopausal Women

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A testosterone patch can provide a modest but meaningful improvement in postmenopausal female libido for women not taking estrogen, according to research published in the Nov. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Human Papillomavirus Causes 25,000 US Cancer Cases Annually

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- There were approximately 25,000 cases of cancer in the United States each year from 1998 to 2003 attributable to infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), according to the first estimate of HPV-associated cancers compiled by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in the Nov. 15 supplement to the journal Cancer.

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Weight Gain Increases Severity of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Excess postnatal weight gain exacerbates disruptions in reproductive phenotype caused by excess prenatal testosterone exposure, and can increase the severity of polycystic ovary syndrome, according to research published online Oct. 30 in Endocrinology.

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HPV Promotes Cancer Under Low Oxygen Conditions

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Cancers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, such as cervical cancer, may result or worsen from the virus promoting carcinogenesis under the low oxygen conditions often found in tumors, according to an article in the Nov. 4 issue of Cancer Cell.

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Vitamin Supplementation Fails to Reduce Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In women with a high risk for cardiovascular disease, supplementation with combined folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 has neither a beneficial nor harmful effect on cancer risk, researchers report in the Nov. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Breast Implants Linked to Type of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

TUESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Silicone breast implants may be associated with an increased risk of a rare but potentially life-threatening condition: anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma (ALCL) of the breast, according to preliminary research published in the Nov. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Access to Primary Care Key to US Health Care Reform

TUESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing the number of primary care physicians, especially family physicians, is crucial to solving the U.S. health care crisis, according to an article published online Nov. 3 in The Lancet.

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Caffeine in Pregnancy Can Reduce Birth Weight

TUESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of caffeine, whether from tea, coffee, chocolate or caffeinated drinks, is associated with an increased risk of giving birth to a low birth weight baby, according to the results of a study published Nov. 3 in BMJ Online First.

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Prenatal Screening Guidelines May Add to Balancing Act

TUESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The creation of clinical practice guidelines in Canada in 2007 regarding prenatal testing for fetal aneuploidy may make clinicians more likely to be the target of successful wrongful birth litigation, according to an analysis article in the Nov. 4 issue of CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Rain Points to Environmental Trigger for Autism

MONDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- There is a higher prevalence of children with autism in areas with higher annual precipitation rates versus areas with lower rates of rainfall, pointing to an environmental trigger for the condition, according to an article published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial

Progress Made Towards Elimination of Rubella

MONDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- While progress toward the elimination of rubella has been made across the Americas, vaccination coverage must remain high, surveillance maintained and training opportunities must be increased, according to a report published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Oct. 31 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Gestational Weight Gain Linked to Infant Birth Weight

MONDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of fetal macrosomia, or high birth weight, significantly increases with increasing maternal glycemia levels, and is nearly doubled among pregnant women with weight gain over 40 pounds, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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