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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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January 2009 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: February 01, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for January 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Extreme Preterm Infants Likely to Test Positive for Autism

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In infants born before 28 weeks' gestation, major motor, cognitive, visual and hearing impairments account for more than 50 percent of positive Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) screens, according to a report published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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Number of Low Birth Weight Babies Rises in Massachusetts

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The steady rise in the number of low birth weight babies in Massachusetts from 1997 to 2004 can only partially be explained by the increased use of assisted reproductive technology, according to a report published in the Jan. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Motility Studies Useful in Neonatal Dysphagia

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In neonatal dysphagia, pharyngoesophageal motility studies combined with clinical observations during evaluation can play a useful role in the development of well-structured multidisciplinary feeding strategies, researchers report in the February issue of the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

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Anticholinergic Agents Linked to Cognitive Impairment

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cumulative long-term use of anticholinergic medications can lead to cognitive impairment, including poor memory and executive function, according to study findings published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Americans Face Soaring Health Insurance Premiums

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Health insurance premiums in America will double by 2016 unless there are major health care reforms, according to a report titled Health Care in Crisis: How Special Interests Could Double Health Costs and How We Can Stop It, published Jan. 28 by the Public Interest Research Group.

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Mammography Benefits High-Risk Women in Late 30s

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- For women carrying mutations in the BRCA gene, who are advised to begin mammography screening at as early as 25 to 30 years of age, the reduction in breast cancer mortality outweighs the risk of radiation-induced cancer mortality in women screened annually at 35 to 39 years of age but maybe not younger age groups, according to the results of a study published in the Feb. 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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FX06 Cuts Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Injury

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to treat acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), using intravenous FX06, a fibrin-derived naturally occurring peptide, significantly reduces the necrotic core zone, but does not change scar size or troponin I levels, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Estrogen Protects Against Effects of High-Fat Diet

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Modulation of the estrogen receptor α (ERα) pathway may protect against insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, suggesting it is an effective target for high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetes, according to the results of a study in mice published online Jan. 22 in Endocrinology.

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Parental Support Program May Reduce Child Maltreatment

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The Triple P - Positive Parenting Program -- a multi-level system of parenting support that integrates local media, public seminars and parent consultation by specially trained providers in clinics, schools, churches and community centers -- may help reduce child maltreatment, according to a report published online Jan. 22 in Prevention Science.

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Arterial Stiffness Predicts Hypertension Drug Response

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with hypertension and high levels of arterial stiffness are less likely to respond to antihypertensive drugs, researchers report in the Feb. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Newer Antidepressants Not All the Same

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- There are significant differences in terms of efficacy and acceptability between 12 new-generation antidepressants, according to an article published online Jan. 29 in The Lancet.

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Bisphenol A Levels Do Not Decrease with Fasting

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A, an industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins and polyvinyl chloride plastic, may accumulate in body tissue or be ingested via substantial non-food sources, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Gene Appears to Play Role in Epilepsy EEG Trait

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A mutation in a non-coding region of the Elongator Protein Complex 4 ELP4 gene appears to be associated with rolandic epilepsy, which is marked by nocturnal seizures that begin in childhood and remit in adolescence, according to research published online Jan. 28 in the European Journal of Human Genetics.

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Weight Loss Reduces Urinary Incontinence in Obese Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence, a six-month weight-loss program significantly reduces the frequency of self-reported incontinence episodes, researchers report in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Clopidogrel/Proton Pump Inhibitor Combo Questioned

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack patients who take both clopidogrel and a proton pump inhibitor other than pantoprazole have an increased risk of reinfarction and may lose the beneficial effects of clopidogrel, according to research published online Jan. 28 in CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Glucose Control Important for Acute Coronary Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiologists should be aware of the link between admission hyperglycemia and increased mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome, according to an article published Feb. 3 in a supplement to the Journal of the American College of Cardiology devoted to glucose issues.

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Rapidly Changing Moles Associated with 'Sun Tan Jab'

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- An untested, injectable drug that is sold on the Internet for its tanning properties is associated with rapidly changing moles, according to an article published online Jan. 27 in BMJ.

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Insulin Therapy Linked to Better Pediatric ICU Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of insulin to target blood glucose to age-adjusted normal fasting values was associated with improved outcomes in infants and children in intensive care, according to research published online Jan. 27 in The Lancet.

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Longer Antibiotic Regimen Superior in Pregnant Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A one-day regimen of the antibiotic nitrofurantoin is markedly less effective than a seven-day regimen to treat asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women, according to research published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Early Blood Transfusion Increases Respiratory Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Early transfusion of packed red blood cells, particularly in large amounts, increases the risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in trauma patients, researchers report in the February issue of Anesthesiology.

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Keeping Ovaries Safe in Some Endometrial Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Premenopausal women with early-stage endometrial cancer do not have higher odds of five-year survival if they undergo oophorectomy in addition to hysterectomy, according to study findings published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Faster Response Linked to Improved Cardiac Survival

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- During a recent period, improvements in the "chain of survival" were linked to increased survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in a region of Japan, according to research published online Jan. 26 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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British Breast Screening Leaflet Lacks Information

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.K. breast cancer screening information leaflet, "Breast Screening: the Facts," downplays the risks of screening to the extent that it cannot be relied upon to help a patient make a genuinely informed decision, according to an article published online Jan. 27 in BMJ.

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Chronic Hyperglycemia Linked to Cognitive Dysfunction

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, higher A1C levels are associated with lower scores on cognitive tests, researchers report in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Acupuncture Offers Only Minimal Pain Relief

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture offers some pain relief but at a level below clinical significance, according to a report published online Jan. 28 in BMJ.

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BNP Levels Not a Superior Guide for Heart Failure Therapy

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Using N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels to guide heart failure therapy does not improve overall clinical outcomes or patient quality of life compared to using symptoms to guide treatment, according to a report published in the Jan. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low Mammogram Rates Among Pediatric Cancer Survivors

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recommended guidelines, a number of women who received chest radiation for a childhood cancer have not had mammography screening for breast cancer in the previous two years, according to the results of a study published in the Jan. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Secondhand Smoke Leads to Erectile Dysfunction in Mice

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand smoke reduces erectile function in mice, but the effects can be reversed by treatment with sildenafil, researchers report in the February issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Caloric Restriction Improves Memory in Elderly

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing calorie intake by 30 percent improves memory in elderly individuals, according to research published online Jan. 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Good Survival Post-Cardiac Arrest After Angiography

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who are resuscitated after a heart attack have good survival and neurological recovery after undergoing emergent angiography and revascularization, particularly if they are alert post-resuscitation, according to a report in the Feb. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Counseling Helps Prevent Excessive Pregnancy Weight Gain

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is effectively prevented with a consistent counseling program focused on diet and lifestyle, according to an article published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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AHA Supports Omega-6 for Possible Heart Protection

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association recommends that at least 5 to 10 percent of individuals' calories should come from omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, according to a science advisory published online Jan. 26 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Overnight Rostral Fluid Shift Linked to Impaired Sleep

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In non-obese men, overnight fluid displacement from the legs to the neck related to prolonged sitting may play a previously unrecognized role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea, according to research published in the February issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Psychosis Linked to Attention-Deficit Disorder Drugs

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In children receiving drug treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms may be a sign of an adverse drug reaction, according to a report published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

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Exercise Can Reduce Insulin Resistance in Obese Elders

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Combining resistance and aerobic exercise is the best way to reduce functional limitations and insulin resistance in elderly patients with abdominal obesity, according to study findings published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Imaging Detects Cardiac Abnormalities in Endocarditis

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Multislice computed tomography (CT) is effective in detecting valvular abnormalities in patients with suspected infective endocarditis compared with transesophageal echocardiography and surgical specimens, researchers report in the Feb. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Clinical Information Technology Leads to Safer Hospitals

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that make use of clinical information technology to automate notes, records, order entry and clinical decision support have lower mortality rates, fewer complications and also save money, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Prolonged Use of Loop Diuretics May Raise Fracture Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who use loop diuretics are at increased risk of fractures, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Meditation Practice Linked to Less Pain Sensitivity

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Experience in Zen meditation is associated with reduced pain sensitivity, a finding supporting the value of mindfulness-based meditation, according to research published in the January issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

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Accidental Infant Bed Deaths Have Quadrupled Since 1984

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For unknown reasons, the infant mortality rate attributable to accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed has quadrupled since 1984 in the United States, according to study findings published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

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Alcohol-Use Disorders Are Common, But Treatable

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- About one-quarter of individuals with alcohol-use disorders will seek help for their problems, and health care providers should routinely screen for alcohol dependence or abuse, according to a seminar published online Jan. 26 in The Lancet.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked to Insulin Resistance

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with insulin resistance in obesity and also independently of obesity, which may increase the risk of developing other chronic conditions, according to two studies published in the February issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Rates of Severe Obstetric Complications on the Rise

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Severe obstetric complications have occurred at an increasing rate, and many are associated with a mirrored increase in the rate of Caesarean deliveries, according to research published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Prostate Cancer May Be Underdiagnosed in Poor Men

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Although the detection of low-risk prostate cancers has been increasing in the United States due to screening, this is not the case among low-income, disadvantaged men, researchers report in the February issue of the Journal of Urology.

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AHA Reveals Top 10 Heart Disease Research Advances

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association (AHA) has released its annual top 10 list of advances in research into heart disease and stroke, with a study on the impact of smoke-free legislation on hospitalizations for acute coronary syndrome topping the list.

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CDC Reports Increase of Hib Infections in Minnesota

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Five children in Minnesota have become ill with Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) in the past year, and one of them died, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Jan. 23.

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Smoking Causes Over 440,000 US Deaths Each Year

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- There were an estimated 443,000 deaths a year from 2000 to 2004 attributable to smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke in the United States, according to a report published in the Jan. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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More Recess Time Leads to Better Classroom Behavior

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Elementary school-age students who receive at least one daily recess period of 15 minutes or more are likely to show better behavior in the classroom, according to study findings published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

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Teenage Obesity Linked to Poor Maternal-Fetal Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obesity in teenage mothers is associated with an increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes, according to research published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Impaired Kidney Function Linked to Mortality in Elderly

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Impaired kidney function is associated with a higher risk of death and cardiovascular disease in elderly individuals at risk of vascular disease, while statins reduce the risk of death and heart attack in patients with impaired kidney function, according to the results of a study published online Jan. 20 in PLoS Medicine.

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No Evidence Base to Support Smoker-Free Workplace Rule

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Smoker-free workplace policies unfairly discriminate against smokers and lack an evidence base to support claims that they reduce smoking, according to an article published online Jan. 23 in Tobacco Control.

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Seat Belt, Air Bag Protect Against Spinal Fracture

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Although the occurrence of spinal fractures among drivers and front-seat passengers in motor vehicle crashes has increased despite increases in seat belt and air bag use, their combined use is protective against spinal fractures, according to study findings published in the February issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

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Salmonella Outbreaks Highlight Risk from Live Poultry

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to live poultry caused two separate outbreaks of Salmonella in the United States in 2007, according to a report published in the Jan. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Spousal Violence Increases Odds of Fetal Loss

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose husbands are violent toward them are more likely to experience single or recurrent fetal loss, researchers report in the Jan. 24 issue of The Lancet.

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Abuse of Dementia Patients by Carers Is Common

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- It is common for people with dementia to be abused by family carers, most often with verbal abuse, although frequent and physical abuse seems to be rare, according to the results of a study published online Jan. 22 in BMJ.

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Ethical HIV Testing in Poor Countries Needed

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Testing a patient's blood without their consent for HIV is important for HIV surveillance, but needs to be carefully implemented in developing countries to ensure that testing is done ethically, according to an article published online Jan. 20 in PLoS Medicine.

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Educational Booklets Don't Affect Neck-Pain Outcomes

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In neck-pain patients receiving workers' compensation, the use of educational booklets has no significant effect on improving outcomes, according to study findings published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

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Novel Biomarkers Predict Death, Myocardial Infarction

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- When patients are admitted to the hospital with ischemic-type chest pain, two novel biomarkers can provide useful prognostic information, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Occupational Exposures Increase Nurses' Asthma Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses who are exposed to occupational cleaning products and disinfectants may have an increased risk of new-onset asthma, according to a report published online Jan. 22 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Cholesterol Particle Size Associated with Coronary Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between the risk of coronary artery disease and both size and concentration of high-density lipoprotein, although the former is explained by markers associated with the metabolic syndrome, according to research published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Car Crashes Among US Elderly Declined in Past Decade

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Fatal crash rates among the elderly have fallen in the past decade in the United States, according to research published in a recent issue of the Annals of Advances in Automotive Medicine. A related study published online Jan. 21 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews notes that studies examining the effect of vision testing on traffic accidents among elderly individuals do not exist.

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Vaginal Herpes Microbicide Protects Against Infection

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A vaginal microbicide targeting a herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) gene and a host gene protects mice against infection for a week, researchers report in the Jan. 22 issue of Cell Host & Microbe.

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Baby with Seizures Had Rickets and Anemia

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A 9-month-old baby who presented with seizures and a bulging fontanelle was diagnosed as having rickets due to vitamin D deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and severe protein-calorie malnutrition, according to a case report published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Peanut Butter Crackers, Dog Snacks Among Recalled Items

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The list of recalled products resulting from the recent Salmonella typhimurium outbreak has grown, and officials believe a processing plant in Blakely, Ga., may be the source of the outbreak, according to officials speaking at a teleconference conducted Jan. 21 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Warfarin-Related Genotyping Not Cost-Effective

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic testing prior to initiation of warfarin therapy is only cost-effective in patients who are at high risk for hemorrhage, and is not cost-effective for typical patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, according to a report published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Less Air Pollution Linked to Higher Life Expectancy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Reductions in air pollution over the last few decades in the United States are associated with increases in life expectancy, researchers report in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Prednisolone Ineffective for Virus-Induced Wheezing

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The oral corticosteroid prednisolone should not be routinely given to children with wheezing due to a viral infection, according to research published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Supplements Can Contain Excess Iodine

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Some over-the-counter supplements contain high levels of iodine that may interfere with radioiodine treatment in patients with thyroid cancer, according to a case study published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Schizophrenics Experience High Rates of Discrimination

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with schizophrenia experience high rates of both anticipated and experienced discrimination, according to an article published online Jan. 21 in The Lancet.

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Novel Laser Technique to Treat Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw may be effectively treated by a laser bone ablation technique, according to research published in the January issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Preterm Infants May Be Exposed to Toxic Additives in Meds

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- After birth, premature babies are exposed to multiple, potentially toxic excipients, suggesting that strategies are needed to reduce the excipient load, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition.

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Children's Eating Habits Decline When They Start School

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- School-aged children eat more snack foods, consume more sweetened drinks and watch more television than their preschool counterparts, according to a report published in the January issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

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Industrial Chemical May Be Human Carcinogen

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The chemical 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) -- a vulcanizing agent in the rubber manufacturing industry, corrosion inhibitor in auto radiator and metalworking fluids, and stabilizer in the manufacture of plastics -- may be carcinogenic, according to an article published online Jan. 21 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Novel Light Imaging Technique Detects Melanoma

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Multimodal polarized light imaging using tetracycline or methylene blue is an effective strategy to image dysplastic and benign nevi in melanoma, researchers report in the January issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Many Support Surrogate Consent in Dementia Research

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Most participants in a sample of older Americans supported allowing families to provide surrogate consent decisions as part of research on dementia, and most would also participate in surrogate-based research, according to the results of a study published in the Jan. 13 issue of Neurology.

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Escitalopram Modestly Improves Anxiety in Elderly

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram modestly improves anxiety symptoms and role functioning compared with placebo in elderly adults with anxiety disorder, according to study findings published in the Jan. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Food Supplementation Reduces Wasting in African Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term food supplementation reduces wasting among children in Niger, but does not reduce the death rate, researchers report in the Jan. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Genetic Variants Predict Heart Disease in Women

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although genetic variations in chromosome 9p21.3 are associated with incident cardiovascular disease in white women, they do not add to the predictive value of traditional risk factors, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein or a family history of premature heart attack, according to a report published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Severity of Myocardial Infarction Has Declined

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- There was a decline in the severity of myocardial infarction from 1987 to 2002, which could help explain the reduction in mortality due to coronary heart disease, according to the results of a study published online Jan. 19 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Low Neuroticism Linked to Decreased Dementia

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Low neuroticism and high social extraversion is associated with a decreased risk of dementia, although low neuroticism lowers risk even among socially isolated persons, according to an article published in the Jan. 20 issue of Neurology.

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Endoluminal Therapies Effective for Treatment of GERD

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Endoluminal therapies, including full-thickness plication and endoscopic radiofrequency, provide symptomatic relief and lead to reduced reliance on proton pump inhibitor drugs in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Community Intervention Boosts Activity Levels

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Residents of Recife, Brazil, who participated in a community-based intervention designed to boost levels of physical activity were more likely than their non-participating counterparts to engage in more physical leisure pursuits, according to research published in the January issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

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Awareness of Peripheral Arterial Disease Lacking

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with knowledge of other cardiovascular diseases, the Canadian public is unaware of the risks of peripheral arterial disease, according to study findings published in the January issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Helps Predict Cardiac Outcome

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The absolute coronary artery calcium score is a better predictor of cardiovascular outcomes than age, sex and race/ethnicity, according to a report published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Psoriasis Support Sites Linked to Perceived Improvements

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Virtual communities of psoriasis patients allow users to benefit from educational resources as well as psychological and social support systems, researchers report in the January issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Heart Risk Linked to Metabolic Syndrome and Smoking

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In China, older adults with metabolic syndrome who are exposed to either active or passing smoking have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a report published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Life-Support Allocation Policy Needed for Public Emergencies

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Current recommendations concerning who should receive scarce life support during a public health emergency such as an influenza pandemic are in need of refinement, according to research published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Pediatric MRSA Infections Increase Alarmingly

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The nationwide prevalence of pediatric methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) head and neck infections grew 16.3 percent between 2001 and 2006, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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Increased Mortality Linked to Topical Retinoid Usage

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Topical tretinoin, a frequently prescribed retinoid cream, is associated with increased all-cause mortality, according to study results published in the January issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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New Guidelines Issued for Tuberculosis Testing

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Although culture remains the gold standard for laboratory confirmation of tuberculosis, nucleic acid amplification testing should be standard practice in suspected cases because it shortens the amount of time required to diagnose the disease from one or two weeks to one or two days, according to updated guidelines published in the Jan. 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Hospitalizations Decline in Young Children with Pneumonia

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In 2005 and 2006, the incidence rates for all-cause pneumonia hospitalizations among children under age 2 significantly declined compared with the 1997-1999 rates, suggesting an association with the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in 2000, according to a report published in the Jan. 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Many Inmates Don't Receive Proper Health Care

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- While incarcerated, many inmates with serious chronic health needs do not receive proper care, and many inmates with mental illnesses were not on their treatment when they were arrested, according to research published online Jan. 15 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Women's Blood Mercury Levels Vary Geographically

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In recent years, among American women of childbearing age, elevated blood mercury has been more common in those living in coastal areas, and broken down by region, the Northeast has had the highest percentage of women with blood concentrations above a level of concern, according to research published in the January Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Metabolic Syndrome Common Among Football Linemen

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Collegiate football linemen may be at risk of cardiovascular disease because of metabolic syndrome, according to a study published in the November/December issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

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Initial Placebo Doesn't Change Response in Depressed Teens

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