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Category: Internal Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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February 2009 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Last Updated: March 02, 2009.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for February 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Fampridine Boosts Mobility in Multiple Sclerosis

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Fampridine, an investigational potassium-channel blocker, improves walking ability and reduces ambulatory disability in patients with multiple sclerosis, according to research published in the Feb. 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Risk Score May Help Predict Atrial Fibrillation

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed risk score based on readily available clinical factors can predict an individual's absolute risk of developing atrial fibrillation, allowing high-risk individuals to be targeted for prevention, according to research published in the Feb. 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Goserelin Treatment Shows Similar Benefits As Tamoxifen

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The use of goserelin was associated with improved rates of survival and recurrence over the long term in women with breast cancer, according to research published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Daytime Sleepiness Linked to Risk of Death in Elderly

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Older individuals who are excessively sleepy during the day may face a higher risk of mortality, according to research published online Feb. 26 in the journal Stroke.

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Ischemic Strokes Rise Steeply with Age Even in Young

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as high cholesterol and hypertension, were common in a group of younger stroke patients, according to research published online Feb. 26 in the journal Stroke.

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Guidelines for Prevention of Rheumatic Fever Updated

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Prevention of rheumatic fever relies on proper identification and treatment of the bacteria responsible, with penicillin being the preferred treatment, according to updated guidelines published online Feb. 26 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Genetic Variants Predict Survival in Pancreatic Cancer

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, mismatch repair gene polymorphisms may be significantly associated with clinical outcomes, according to a report published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Technique Renders Breast Cancer Sensitive to Tamoxifen

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Switching on the estrogen receptor (ER) gene in the one-third of breast cancers that do not produce the receptor, which have a poor prognosis, restores their sensitivity to tamoxifen, according to the results of a study published online Feb. 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Exacerbations Cluster in Time in Chronic Lung Disease

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Exacerbations cluster together in time in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with second exacerbations occurring within eight weeks of the first in about one-quarter of patients, researchers report in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Gene Mutation Linked to Higher Risk of Colon Cancer Death

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in a gene involved in promoting cell growth increase the risk of cancer-specific death in patients with colon cancer, and the increased risk appears to depend on the absence of mutations in another cancer-promoting gene, according to research published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Type 2 Diabetes Prevalence Increasing in United Kingdom

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In the United Kingdom, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes increased from 2.8 percent in 1996 to 4.3 percent in 2005, according to a report published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Tacrolimus, Corticosteroid Regimen May Improve Dermatitis

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A sequential regimen of tacrolimus ointment and tapered use of topical corticosteroids in children may provide control of atopic dermatitis while limiting exposure to corticosteroids, according to research published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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PSA Provides Higher Cancer Prediction By Race

FRIDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has a higher prediction for prostate cancer in African American men, which may be explained by genetic West African ancestry, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Light Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer Risk in Women

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Even low levels of alcohol consumption may raise women's risks of certain cancers, according to research published in the Mar. 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Liver Cancer Rates Tripled in the United States Since 1970s

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States has tripled since the 1970s, although survival has continued to improve due to better diagnosis and treatment, according to a report published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Supplements Affect Expression of Prostate Cancer Genes

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In prostate cancer patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy, selenium and vitamin E have significant effects on expression levels of genes commonly associated with cancer development and progression that may have clinical implications, according to an article published in the Mar. 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Causes of Stillbirth Remain Poorly Understood

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In a bid to tackle the lack of understanding about the risk factors and causes of stillbirth, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has issued guidelines for clinicians in a new Practice Bulletin published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Age, Treatment Predictive of Leukemia Prognosis

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Complete response, time to treatment failure and overall survival are useful outcomes for developing new prognostic models for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, according to research published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Male Infertility Linked to Testicular Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Men with male factor infertility showed a markedly higher risk of testicular cancer than men in the general population, according to research published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Two Types of Stents Get Similar Results

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Unprotected left main coronary artery disease can be safely treated with either paclitaxel- or sirolimus-eluting stents, according to the results of a study published online Feb. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Antihypertensive Treatment Benefits Dialysis Patients

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In dialysis patients, treatment with blood pressure-lowering medications may significantly reduce rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, according to the results of a study published online Feb. 26 in The Lancet.

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Pain May Occur After Magnetic Resonance Arthrography

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients may notice pain following magnetic resonance arthrography, particularly several hours after the procedure, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

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Various Diet Compositions Effective for Weight Loss

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Diets where calories come from a range of fat, protein and carbohydrate combinations are similarly effective in promoting weight loss and reducing cardiovascular risk factors, researchers report in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Drug-Resistant Meningitis Present in North America

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Ciprofloxacin-resistant meningitis has appeared in North America, although the bacteria remain susceptible to other antibiotics, according to a report in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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HPV-Positive Test Less Likely Than Previously Reported

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of a positive carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) test in a general population of women is less likely than previously reported, suggesting concerns over HPV testing in general clinical practice may be overstated, according to research published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Osteopontin May Be Heart Risk Factor in Psoriasis Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Circulating osteopontin -- a glycophosphoprotein secreted by epithelial and many other cell types -- may be a cardiovascular risk factor in individuals with psoriasis, according to research published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Difficult Patient Encounters Common for Primary Care Docs

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Though difficult patient encounters are common for primary care physicians, certain physician characteristics were linked to more frequent encounters that were perceived as difficult, according to research published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Exercise Testing Predicts Death in Lung Fibrosis Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis whose maximal oxygen uptake during exercise is below a certain threshold have a higher risk of death, according to study findings published in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Adolescent Obesity As Harmful to Health As Smoking

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who are overweight or obese have a similar mortality risk in adulthood as their peers who are light or heavy smokers, respectively, according to a report published online Feb. 24 in BMJ.

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Calcium, Other Nutrients May Reduce Disease Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Several nutrients were associated with possible protection from cancer and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to two studies published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Diabetes May Increase Risk for Perinatal Depression

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women who develop diabetes either prior to or during pregnancy are more likely to experience perinatal depression, including postpartum depression, researchers report in the Feb. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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More Heart Guidelines Based on Low Levels of Evidence

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Many recommendations in guidelines are based on low levels of evidence or expert opinion, according to an article published in the Feb. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Released Inmates Unlikely to Fill Antiretroviral Prescriptions

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A vast majority of HIV-infected prison inmates, after release, do not fill their prescriptions for antiretroviral therapy medication in a timely manner to avoid treatment interruption, according to study findings published in the Feb. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Insurance Essential for Good Health, Well-Being

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Having health insurance is vital for health and well-being, and when rates of uninsurance are high, even insured people are more likely to struggle to obtain necessary care, according to a new report from the Institute of Medicine released online Feb. 24.

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Vitamin D Levels Linked to Respiratory Tract Infections

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D levels are inversely associated with upper respiratory tract infections, in a robust dose-response relationship that is clinically and statistically significant, according to research published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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US Health Spending May Have Hit $2.4 Trillion in 2008

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Health spending in the United States was estimated to be $2.4 trillion last year, and is expected to account for an unprecedented share of the economy this year, according to a report published online Feb. 24 in Health Affairs.

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Reminders May Improve Rates of Colorectal Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Mailed reminders to patients and electronic reminders to physicians may improve rates of colorectal cancer screening and detection of adenomas, according to study findings published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Anger Induces Heart Instability and Arrhythmias

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Anger-induced T-wave alternans, a marker of repolarization instability, predicts ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), providing a link between stress and sudden death, according to a report in the Mar. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Workers' Comp Linked to Poor Back Surgery Outcomes

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Workers' compensation patients who undergo lumbar discectomy may have a greater risk of poor outcomes than non-compensated patients, according to study findings published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

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Global Burden of Stroke Varies Widely

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The burden of stroke mortality varies widely around the world, and the incidence of stroke in high-income countries has declined in the last four decades, while it has doubled in low- and middle-income countries over the same time period, according to two articles published online Feb. 20 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract - Johnston
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Study Supports Halt of PSA Testing in Some Older Men

TUESDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Men who are 75 to 80 years old and have a prostate specific antigen (PSA) less than 3 ng/mL are not likely to have life-threatening prostate cancer during the remainder of their lives, according to research released online in advance of publication in the April issue of the Journal of Urology.

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DVT Prevention to Be Considered for All Urologic Surgeries

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Consideration of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis is recommended for all patients undergoing a urological surgical procedure, according to a best practice statement from the American Urological Association published in the March issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Long-Term Epilepsy Risk High After Traumatic Brain Injury

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In children and young adults with traumatic brain injury, the risk of epilepsy persists for 10 years or longer, according to a report published online Feb. 23 in The Lancet.

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Black Women Face Higher Risk of Early Mycosis Fungoides

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women are more likely than men to present with mycosis fungoides -- the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma -- before the age of 40, as are black and Hispanic patients, according to research published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Racial Disparity Persists in Total Knee Replacements

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Racial disparity between blacks and whites in total knee replacement procedures has persisted, despite adoption of a Healthy People 2010 objective to eliminate these disparities, according to a report published in the Feb. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Obesity Gene Linked to Energy Expenditure

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Mice lacking the Fto gene, where common human variants have been linked to obesity, are leaner due to increased energy expenditure despite the fact that they eat more and move less, according to research published online Feb. 22 in Nature.

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Postnatal Glucocorticoids Affect Adaptation to Stress

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal glucocorticoid excess due to deletion of pituitary glucocorticoid receptors affects the ability of adult mice to cope with stress, according to research published online Feb. 12 in Endocrinology.

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Heat Increases Respiratory Hospital Admissions in Elderly

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing temperatures in Europe in the spring and summer are associated with an increase in hospital admissions for respiratory problems in the elderly, which may become worse with global warming and an aging population, researchers report in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Medicaid Patients May Travel Long Distance for Spine Care

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid patients may have less access to local spine care than patients with private, commercial health insurance, according to a report published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

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Hormone Reverses Asthma Changes in Mouse Model

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The antifibrotic peptide hormone relaxin reverses lung fibrosis and airway hyperresponsiveness in a mouse model of asthma, according to the results of a study published online Feb. 12 in Endocrinology.

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Azacitidine May Be Effective in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Azacitidine, as opposed to conventional care, improves overall survival in patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, according to research published online Feb. 19 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Tibolone Linked to Breast Cancer Recurrence

MONDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The synthetic steroid tibolone increases the risk of breast cancer recurrence, according to a report published in the February issue of The Lancet Oncology.

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Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Use On The Rise

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- During recent years, contralateral prophylactic mastectomy has become a more commonly used treatment in women with ductal carcinoma in situ, according to research published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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PCI Shows Benefit in Elderly With MI, Cardiogenic Shock

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention, elderly patients showed similar one-year survival and other outcomes as younger patients, according to research published in the February Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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ASCO Oncology Exam Tests Fellows' Competencies

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The development of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 200-question Medical Oncology In-Training Examination required four years and contributions from a testing organization and volunteer question-writers, according to an overview of the process published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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FDA Issues Exemption for Device That Treats OCD

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a human device exemption for a system that uses electrical therapy in the brain to suppress severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms, according to a release issued by the agency Feb. 19.

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Gunshot Victims May Lie About Source of Their Injuries

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency-department personnel should be alert to the possibility that some patients may conceal the fact that their injuries were caused by gunfire, according to a letter published in the Feb. 21 issue of The Lancet.

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Novel Drug May Benefit Patients With Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The investigational drug A-002 may be an effective anti-atherosclerotic agent because it reduces levels of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) enzymes, plasma lipoproteins, and inflammatory biomarkers, according to a study published in the Feb. 21 issue of The Lancet.

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Vertebroplasty May Protect Osteoporotic Vertebrae

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Prophylactic vertebroplasty may protect adjacent intact vertebrae from fatigue injury in some patients with osteoporosis, according to a biomechanical study in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

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Rare Brain Infection Confirmed in Patients on Efalizumab

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Three cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) have been confirmed in patients taking the psoriasis drug efalizumab (Raptiva), according to a public health advisory issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Feb. 19.

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Eltrombopag Increases Platelet Counts in Purpura

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, eltrombopag -- an oral, non-peptide, thrombopoietin-receptor agonist -- may help manage thrombocytopenia, according to a study published in the Feb. 21 issue of The Lancet.

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Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Lower Risk of Stroke

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged and older adults, a combination of four healthy lifestyle behaviors may significantly reduce the risk of stroke, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the British Medical Journal.

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Young Adults Experience Significant Health Challenges

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults have a number of health challenges, including risk of obesity, high rates of injury and lack of insurance coverage, according to the report Health, United States: 2008, published Feb. 18 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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High-Dose Candesartan Can Reduce Proteinuria

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Extra-high dosages of candesartan may be beneficial in reducing persistent proteinuria, according to research published online Feb. 11 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Combo Blood Pressure-Lowering Regimen Good for Kidneys

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A blood pressure-lowering treatment strategy of perindopril-indapamide may prevent renal dysfunction in some patients with type 2 diabetes, regardless of baseline blood pressure level, according to the results of a study published online Feb. 18 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Pressure Test Predicts Heart Disease in Kidney Patients

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A pulse pressure test predicts coronary artery calcium and survival in patients with chronic kidney disease, according to research published in the February issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Genetic Variants Associated with Blood Pressure Variations

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic variants at the NPPA-NPPB locus may influence hypertension due to effects on natriuretic peptide concentrations, according to research published online Feb. 15 in Nature Genetics.

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Chorionic Villus Sampling Method Deemed Safe

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) is a frequent and safe prenatal method for genetic screening, according to the conclusions of a review published online Feb. 11 in the Journal of Craniofacial Surgery.

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Early Recognition of Depression May Benefit Cancer Survivors

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- People diagnosed with cancer may face an increased risk of depression that persists for years, according to research published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Proposed Changes to Health Care Would Reduce Costs

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Simultaneous gains in universal health coverage, improved health outcomes and slowed spending growth would have a major impact on the development of public policy, according to a perspective published in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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PCI After Heart Attack Not Effective Over Long Term

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is expensive and does not benefit quality of life, only producing a modest short-term benefit in cardiac physical function that is not maintained, according to a report published in the Feb. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Transparency, Globalization Growing in Clinical Research

THURSDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- All clinical trial data and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration database should be publicly available, and global clinical research should be conducted in relevant populations for potential applications of the intervention, according to two articles published in the Feb. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Pharmacogenetic Algorithm Improves Warfarin Dosage

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A pharmacogenetic dosing algorithm for warfarin is better able to predict the stable therapeutic dose, providing a basis for a larger clinical trial to test the efficacy of these algorithms, according to research published in the Feb. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Best for Certain Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and not percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), results in lower incidence of cardiac or cerebrovascular events in patients with three-vessel or left main coronary artery disease, and should therefore remain the standard of care, according to research released online Feb. 18 in advance of publication in the Mar. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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IDH1, IDH2 Mutations Linked to Malignant Glioma

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes IDH1 and IDH2 appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of malignant gliomas, according to research published in the Feb. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ocular Damage Common in Severe Skin Reactions

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- It is common for patients with the rare skin reactions toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) or Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) to also experience involvement of the eyes, according to the results of a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Coordinating Care Puts Burden on Primary Care Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians face a logistical challenge in coordinating care for primary and non-primary patients because they must interact with large numbers of other physicians and practices, according to a report published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Protected Block Surgical Resident Course Effective

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A course given to surgical residents in their first and second years during protected time away from clinical duties is effective in improving knowledge, communication and surgical skills, according to an article published in the February issue of Archives of Surgery.

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Repairing Heart Defect May Relieve Migraines

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patent foramen ovale closure can greatly reduce the frequency and severity of migraines, according to study findings published in the February issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Non-Invasive Imaging After Exercise Detects Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Using strain imaging to quantify regional heart function after treadmill exercise is an effective and non-invasive way to detect coronary artery disease, researchers report in the Feb. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Predeployment Skin Checks Can Reduce Skin Disease Evacuations

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The number of aeromedical evacuations conducted by the military for patients with ill-defined skin diseases could be reduced if combatants with chronic skin diseases were identified prior to deployment, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Treatment Improves Platelet Function During Stenting

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with bivalirudin plus eptifibatide reduces platelet reactivity and clot strength in patients undergoing elective stenting, which are associated with the risk of myocardial infarction, according to the results of a study published in the Feb. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Eye Problems Found in Many Children with Hearing Loss

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Routine ophthalmologic examinations may be helpful in supporting proper development in children with sensorineural hearing loss, according to research published in the February Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Implementing a Quality Improvement Faculty Path

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A new career pathway in academic medicine, termed clinicians in quality improvement, is a justified concept to achieve and recognize excellence in patient safety, according to a commentary published in the Feb. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Unemployment Higher Among Cancer Survivors

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors, especially of the breast, gastrointestinal system and female reproductive organs, have an increased risk of experiencing unemployment, according to a review published in the Feb. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Possible Risk of Herpes Zoster with Anti-TNF-α Therapy

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a class of drugs that treat a variety of systemic inflammatory diseases, are associated with an increased risk of herpes zoster, according to research published in the Feb. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Gene Linked to Lower Survival in Colorectal Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal cancer patients whose lymph nodes are histologically negative but produce a marker of lymph node metastasis have an earlier time to recurrence and lower disease-free survival, researchers report in the Feb. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Incidence of ICU MRSA Infections Declining

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) central line-associated bloodstream infections has decreased over recent years in most intensive care units (ICUs), according to research published Feb. 18 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Editorial

Ads Featuring 'Drug Facts Box' Help Educate Consumers

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Replacing the brief summary in direct-to-consumer ads with a "drug facts box" may result in improved consumer knowledge and judgment about medication benefits and side effects, according to study findings released online Feb. 17 in advance of publication in the Apr. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Sudden Death in Athletes Rare, But Increasing

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Sudden death in competitive athletes -- a rare but significant event -- is primarily due to cardiovascular disease, which lends support to the use of cardiovascular screening prior to participation in athletic training, according to research published online Feb. 16 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Risk of Death After Surgery Lower at Teaching Hospitals

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients receiving surgery at major teaching hospitals are less likely to die and less likely to die after complications, although this finding is not observed among black patients, according to a report in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Coffee, Mediterranean Diet Linked to Lower Stroke Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In women, long-term coffee consumption and adherence to a Mediterranean diet are both associated with a decreased risk of stroke, according to two studies published online Feb. 16 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract - Lopez-Garcia
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Abstract - Fung
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Social Norms Influence Lifeguards' Safe Sun Habits

TUESDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Workplace safe sun policies and participation in skin cancer prevention programs both he

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