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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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October 2010 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: November 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for October 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA: Methotrexate Injection Vials Recalled

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Sandoz have notified health care professionals of a voluntary recall of 24 lots of methotrexate injection (50 mg/2 mL and 250 mg/10 mL vials) due to the presence of small glass particulates in a limited number of vials in four lots.

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CDC Warns Travelers of Cholera Outbreak in Haiti

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has warned those traveling to Haiti to celebrate All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day to take precautions to protect themselves from cholera.

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BPA Exposure Associated With Poorer Semen Quality

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to bisphenol-A (BPA) -- a component of many consumer products, including plastic containers and liners of food and beverage cans -- may have an adverse effect on semen quality, according to research published online Oct. 29 in Fertility and Sterility.

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Pneumonia Vaccination Rate Has Increased in Older Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The number of elderly Americans who get vaccinated against pneumonia has increased, but the proportion is still less than 60 percent, and disparities exist among ethnic and racial groups, according to the 2009 National Healthcare Disparities Report, published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

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Many Factors Found to Predict Hospital Readmission

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to having a chronic disease, many factors, including race, type of payer, depressive symptoms, and even body mass index (BMI), increase the risk of hospital readmission, according to research published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Associations Found Between ADHD and Adulthood BMI

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who report symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at risk for obesity in adulthood, according to research published online Oct. 26 in the International Journal of Obesity.

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Sodium Intake in U.S. Adults Not Seen to Fall Over Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Based on data dating back to the 1950s, sodium intake among adults in the United States appears to exceed recommended intakes, with no evident decrease over time, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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NFL Management of Concussion More Conservative Since 2002

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The most recent six years of National Football League (NFL) concussion data, published online Oct. 1 in Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach, shows only a slight decline in the incidence of concussions but documents more conservative management by team doctors in their return-to-play recommendations.

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Green Tea Does Not Prevent Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although animal and in vitro studies have shown green tea to be protective against breast cancer, a large prospective trial in Japan has found no such benefit; the findings have been published online Oct. 28 in Breast Cancer Research.

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Left Arm Splints Significantly Degrade Driving

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Immobilization of a limb does not prevent many people from driving, but wearing an arm splint appears to have a detrimental effect on this skill, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Video, TV, Gamer Violence Desensitizes Teenage Boys

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent boys who watch violent movies or television programs or play violent video games may become desensitized to aggression, which could promote aggressive attitudes and behaviors, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.

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CDC: Second Dose of Meningitis Vaccine Recommended

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices panel has recommended that 16-year-olds get a meningitis booster shot, as the vaccine does not appear to last as long as previously thought.

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CDC: Whooping Cough Vaccine Recommended for Elderly

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended that adults aged 65 years and older who are in close contact with infants be vaccinated against whooping cough.

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Removing Deductible Affects Use of Preventive Screenings

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among healthy individuals, the use of first-dollar coverage -- also known as zero-deductible coverage -- may modestly improve utilization of preventive services, especially in people in low-deductible plans, according to research published online Oct. 28 in Health Services Research.

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Coffee, Tea Consumption Linked to Lower Glioma Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Coffee and tea consumption is associated with a lower risk of glioma, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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For Coronary Patients, H2RA Plus Clopidogrel Spikes Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The concomitant use of a histamine2-receptor antagonist (H2RA) and clopidogrel for patients with prior acute coronary syndrome (ACS) more than doubles the risk of rehospitalization or death compared to treatment with clopidogrel only, according to research published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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n-3 Fatty Acids May Protect Against Periodontitis

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as those found in fish oils, may be effective for preventing and treating periodontitis, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Radiation-Induced Cancers Still a Threat in Middle Age

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- While standard models and epidemiological data have suggested that radiation-related cancer risks are higher in children and decrease with increasing age at exposure, mathematical models do not support this for all cancer types, according to research published online Oct. 25 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Air Pollution Associated With Diabetes Prevalence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution may be one factor explaining the dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence over the past few decades, according to research published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

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Red Yeast Rice Supplements Lacking Standardization

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Red yeast rice, a popular dietary supplement for reducing cholesterol, contains widely differing concentrations of monacolins, the active ingredients, by brand, and some contain a potentially toxic substance, according to research published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Lifestyle Score, Decision Aid Affect Colon Cancer Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Each additional healthy lifestyle behavior can decrease colorectal cancer risk by 11 percent, according to research published online Oct. 26 in BMJ. In another article in the same issue, a decision aid to help adults with low education levels make informed colorectal cancer screening decisions appears to cause more patients to avoid the screening entirely.

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Opioid Substitution Rx Lowers Mortality Risk for Abusers

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Despite increased risk during the first two weeks, the risk of death during opioid substitution therapy is lower, overall, than the risk of death out of treatment, according to research published online Oct. 26 in BMJ.

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IUD Expulsion Risk Greater With Postpartum Insertion

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who have a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (IUD) inserted immediately after delivery are much more likely to expel the device in the months after delivery than women who delay insertion, but IUD use six months after delivery is similar in the two groups, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Majority of Infants Sleep Through the Night at 5 Months

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A set of criteria can be used by pediatricians to reassure new parents that their infant is likely to sleep through the night -- on the parents' sleep schedule -- by the age of 5 months, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Probe-to-Bone Best Test for Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The best and most efficient test for diagnosing chronic osteomyelitis of the foot in patients with diabetes may be the probe-to-bone (PTB) test, according to research published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

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Smoking in Midlife Linked to Later Dementia Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who smoke heavily in midlife appear to have a higher risk of dementia -- including Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia -- decades later, according to research published online Oct. 25 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Primary Care Trails Other Specialties in Hourly Wages

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians have substantially lower hourly wages than other specialists, and although most physicians find Medicare reimbursement inequitable, they show little consensus on how to reform it, according to two studies published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Barbershop Program Linked to Blood Pressure Benefits

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A program in which barbers with predominantly African-American clients conduct blood pressure monitoring and referral may improve hypertension control among black men, according to research published online Oct. 25 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Colorectal Screening Strategy for Minority Women Tested

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Offering colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) to low-income minority women during mammography visits can be an effective way to increase screening in this population, but a lack of medical insurance remains an important barrier for many women, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Cancer.

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New Bivalent Poliovirus Vaccine Appears Effective

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A novel bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV) against poliovirus types 1 and 3 appears to be superior to trivalent OPV (tOPV) and non-inferior to monovalent type 1 OPV (mOPV1) and mOPV3, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet.

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Teens With Both-Sex Partners Engage in Risky Behaviors

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 sexually active adolescents reports a same-sex partner, and those who have partners of both sexes report behaviors that put them at risk for sexually transmitted infections, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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H1N1 Pandemic in 2010/2011 Season Unlikely

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers analyzing H1N1 antibody levels after the 2009 pandemic have determined that a third wave in 2010 is unlikely, though people aged 50 to 79 may be more vulnerable; their findings, which support shifting vaccination prioritization from young people to older people, have been published online Oct. 18 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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HealthGrades: Lower Mortality Seen at High-Ranked Hospitals

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients at hospitals performing better than average on a variety of procedures and diagnoses have a lower risk of mortality compared to patients at low-performing hospitals, according to research released Oct. 20 by HealthGrades.

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Autism Prevalence Rising Rapidly in Some Schools

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In Wisconsin, the number of children with autism is increasing in school districts with low baseline prevalence, while other school districts are seeing a leveling off in their numbers, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Strength Training Generally Effective in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Resistance training can lead to significantly increased muscular strength in children, but the biggest effect is seen in those who are more physically mature, train longer, and perform more sets, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Children Comprise Two-Thirds of ER Visits for Drug Ingestion

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children under the age of 5 made up two-thirds of emergency department visits for accidental ingestion of drugs in 2008, according to a new report issued by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Vaccination Rate Down in Privately-Insured Children

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination rates among children with private health insurance have decreased -- possibly because of unproven fears that vaccines cause autism -- and rates among children with Medicaid have increased, according to the new State of Health Care Quality report released by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA).

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High-Risk Teens, Parents Underreport Illicit Drug Use

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reports of illicit drug use by high-risk teens and reports of teen drug use by parents are substantially lower than actual drug use as determined objectively by analysis of hair samples, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Elective Bilateral Salpingo-Oophorectomy Has Decreased

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of women electing to undergo bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy has dropped significantly since 2002 after increasing in prior years, though the risks versus the benefits have not been clearly established, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Pediatric Hospitalizations for ATV Injuries on the Rise

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Since the first four-wheeled all-terrain vehicle (ATV) debuted in the mid-1980s, pediatric injuries and deaths related to the use of ATVs have increased notably, more than doubling between 1997 and 2006, according to research published online October 18 in the Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care.

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Cortisone May Help Tennis Elbow in Short Term

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Cortisone injections may provide better short-term relief from tennis elbow than other treatments, but the results don't last beyond three to six weeks, according to research published online Oct. 22 in The Lancet.

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U.S. Diabetes Prevalence Expected to Skyrocket

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- By 2050, as many as one in three U.S. adults are expected to have diabetes if current trends continue, according to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report published Oct. 22 in Population Health Metrics.

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Low-Dose Aspirin Can Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term, low-dose aspirin intake may reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) by nearly a quarter, and the risk of death from CRC by more than a third, according to research published online Oct. 22 in The Lancet.

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Bacteriuria Unrelated to Painful Bladder Syndrome Flares

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Episodes of bacteria in the urine (bacteriuria) do not seem to be related to symptoms of painful bladder syndrome (PBS) in women with interstitial cystitis (IC), according to a study in the October issue of Urology.

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Update on Iron Deficiency in Infants and Toddlers Issued

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have updated a policy statement on diagnosing and preventing iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in children up to age 3 based on data from an extensive literature review; their report has been published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Low Testosterone Linked With CVD-Related Mortality

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests a link between low testosterone levels and increased risk of death in men who have heart disease, according to a report published online Oct. 19 in Heart.

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Eye Damage Seen in Anorexia Nervosa

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Anorexia nervosa (AN) may cause serious eye damage, even without noticeable vision loss, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

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New Guidelines for Recurrent Stroke Prevention Published

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A joint committee representing the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association has published updated evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of ischemic stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack; the statement has been published online Oct. 21 in Stroke.

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Season of First Trimester Associated With Food Allergy

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children who were at about 11 weeks gestational age during springtime allergy season may be at increased risk for sensitivity to food allergies, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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HIV Drug Invirase Gets New Label Reflecting Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- New risk information has been added to the label of the HIV antiviral drug Invirase (saquinavir), notifying patients and health care professionals that the drug can have potentially life-threatening adverse effects when used in combination with another antiviral drug, according to an announcement by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Educational Campaigns May Improve Skin Cancer Screening

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Educational campaigns that include specific recommendations for who should be screened for skin cancer may improve skin cancer screening rates and increase the understanding of screening benefits, according to a study published Oct. 18 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Ankle-Brachial Index Linked to Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Having a low or high ankle-brachial index (ABI) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to research published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Infusion Ups Risk of Organ Failure in Trauma Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Early transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is associated with an increased risk of post-injury multiple organ failure (MOF), according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Psychiatric Comorbidity Ups 30-Day Surgical Mortality

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical patients with a preexisting psychiatric comorbidity have a greater 30-day post-surgical mortality risk, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Neuro/Endothelial Effects of Sleep Apnea Coexist in Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive dysfunction and endothelial dysfunction usually coexist in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), raising the possibility of using the simple measurement of microvascular postischemic reperfusion of the forearm as a screen for cognitive defects as well, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Children With Food Allergies May Face More Bullying

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children and teens with food allergies are at increased risk of bullying and harassment, according to a report published in the October issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Most PCPs Not Following Colorectal Screening Guidelines

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than one-fifth of primary care physicians (PCPs) comply with practice guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, according to the results of a National Cancer Institute survey published online Oct. 14 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Magnetic Therapy Shows Lasting Benefit in Major Depression

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive, non-drug therapy that has been shown to be successful for acute relief of depressive symptoms, appears to have durable long-term benefits as well, according to research published in the October issue of Brain Stimulation.

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Weekly INR Self-Testing Not Superior to Monthly Clinic Tests

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients using warfarin, self-testing of international normalized ratio (INR) doesn't appear superior to clinic testing for reducing the risk of adverse outcomes, including major bleeding and stroke, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Alcohol, Marijuana Use Linked to Youths' Cognitive Problems

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy alcohol consumption, as well as marijuana use, appears to affect cognitive development in adolescents, according to research published online Oct. 19 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Pneumococcal Meningitis Remains Cause of Deafness

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although pneumococcal vaccination has reduced invasive disease, pneumococcal meningitis as a cause of deafness among children has not been eliminated, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Pradaxa Approved for Atrial Fibrillation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help prevent stroke in people with a type of abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation.

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Corticosteroids Decrease Recurrent A-Fib After Ablation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The short-term use of corticosteroids following atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation may safely prevent AF recurrences both immediately after pulmonary vein isolation and over longer follow-up, according to research published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Risk of Restless Legs Found Higher in Fibromyalgia Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with fibromyalgia appear to have a substantially higher risk of restless legs syndrome (RLS), according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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Cardiorespiratory Fitness Linked to Cardiac Death Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although better cardiorespiratory fitness reduces the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in middle-aged and older men, adding this risk factor to a conventional risk-prediction model only modestly improves SCD prediction, according to research published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Physician Assistant, Nurse Roles in Pediatric Care Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- With a shortage of pediatric physicians looming, nurse practitioners and physician assistants may increasingly be called on to deliver pediatric care, but these health care providers may lack the numbers and experience to fill the breach, according to a series of reports published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Hospital Compare Web Site May Offer Limited Patient Guidance

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The use of information available on the Hospital Compare Web site doesn't help patients find hospitals that have better outcomes for high-risk surgeries, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Spinal Fractures Spotlighted During World Osteoporosis Day

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Spinal fractures worldwide occur at an estimated rate of one every 22 seconds, and health care professionals need to be able to recognize the signs of these fractures in their patients, according to the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) report, The Breaking Spine.

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More Node+ Breast Cancer, Higher Mortality After HRT

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal estrogen-plus-progestin therapy not only results in an increased incidence of invasive breast cancers but also in more node-positive cancers and an increased mortality rate, according to an analysis published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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DHA Supplements Don't Prevent Postpartum Depression

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The results of the large, multicenter DOMInO (DHA to Optimize Mother Infant Outcome) trial do not support routine docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation for pregnant women to reduce depressive symptoms or to improve cognitive or language outcomes in early childhood, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Titrated Oxygen Linked to Reduced Mortality in COPD

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the use of titrated oxygen -- compared to routine high-flow oxygen -- in the prehospital setting is associated with reduced mortality, according to research published online Oct. 19 in BMJ.

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Vitamin D Levels Lower in Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS), many of whom routinely protect themselves from the sun due to higher risk of skin cancer, appear to be at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Medicaid Reimbursement Rate Affects Flu Shots for Children

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Higher Medicaid reimbursement rates for influenza vaccine administration are associated with an increase in the number of low-income level children who will receive one, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Invasive Dental Procedures May Up Vascular Event Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Whether due to inflammatory effects or to a brief cessation of daily aspirin or other antiplatelet therapy, invasive dental treatments appear to be associated with a transient increased risk of a vascular event, particularly in the first four weeks after surgery, according to research published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Very Few Clinical Trials Report Composition of Placebo Drug

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The composition of placebos used in clinical trials -- including pills, injectables, and other substances -- are not regulated and rarely reported, which may ultimately compromise the integrity of clinical research, according to a study in the Oct. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Reciprocal Peer Support Promising for Diabetes Care

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to a nurse care management (NCM) system, one-to-one reciprocal peer support (RPS) results in greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) for patients with diabetes, according to research published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Study Seeks Factors in 'Never-Event' Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Wrong-patient and wrong-site procedures -- which are surgical "never events" -- may be continuing at a high frequency, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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New CPR Guidelines Emphasize Chest Compression First

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Lay and professional rescuers using cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to revive someone stricken by cardiac arrest should begin chest compressions first to quickly restore blood circulation, rather than risk the delay to clear the patient's airway and restart breathing, according to the "2010 American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care," published online Oct. 18 in Circulation.

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Homocysteine, B12 Associated With Alzheimer's Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Serum levels of homocysteine (tHcy) and holotranscobalamin (holoTC) -- the active form of vitamin B12 -- may be useful in determining the risk of, and preventing, Alzheimer's disease (AD), with higher holoTC levels being a protective factor, according to research published in the Oct. 19 issue of Neurology.

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Researchers Identify Most Common HPV Types

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Eight types of human papillomavirus (HPV) appear to be responsible for over 90 percent of the world's cervical cancer cases; researchers recommend these eight types be the target for future vaccines and that the three most common high-risk HPV types -- 16, 18, and 45 -- which occur in younger women, should be the focus of type-specific HPV screening. Their findings have been published online Oct. 18 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Soy Lowers Recurrence Rate in Some Types of Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Although concerns have been raised in recent years about the potential adverse effect of soy consumption on estrogen- and progesterone-receptor positive breast cancers, new research has shown a lower risk for recurrence of these cancers for women who consume high amounts of soy isoflavones; the study has been published online Oct. 18 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Offspring of Maternal Suicides at Risk for Suicide Attempt

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children who lose a mother to suicide appear to be at increased risk for suicide attempt-related hospitalization compared with children who lose a mother to a fatal accident, but this association doesn't hold for children who lose a father to suicide, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Compares Accuracy of Fever Screening Systems

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Two of three infrared thermal detection systems (ITDS) tested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reliably distinguish people with and without fever better than individual self reports, according to research published in the November issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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FDA Approves Botox for Chronic Migraine Treatment

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- On Friday, Oct. 15, 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the approval of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) injection for the prevention of headaches in adult patients with chronic migraines.

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Bed Sharing Linked to Higher Rate of Breast-Feeding

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The potential hazard of bed sharing with infants has led many professionals to recommend against it, but researchers who have found a relationship between bed sharing and breast-feeding suggest this relationship be taken into account; their findings have been published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Hypertensive Black Children at Higher Risk Than Non-Blacks

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- African-American children with primary hypertension have clinical characteristics that place them at higher risk of developing heart disease than non-African-American children, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Aids Risk Classification in Elderly

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery calcium (CAC) levels can be used to fine-tune coronary heart disease (CHD) risk assessment in elderly people with no disease symptoms, according to a study in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Epidemiology of Multiple-, Single-Child Autism Described

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Though some families have a single child with autism spectrum disorder, other families have multiple autistic children or otherwise normal children with some autistic traits, suggesting differing genetic bases for the condition, according to a study published Oct. 1 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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FDA Issues Warnings About Unapproved "Chelation" Drugs

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and consumers that no evidence has proved that nonprescription "chelation" products actually rid the body of toxic metals and can treat a variety of serious conditions and diseases.

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Individual BP Goal May Affect Mortality for Dialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients on hemodialysis, age, race, and diabetes status may affect the relationship between blood pressure and mortality, according to research published online Oct. 14 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Experimental HCV Drug Combination Shows Potential

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental oral drug combination appears to be well-tolerated and safe, showing promising antiviral activity for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in The Lancet.

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"Natural" Weight Loss Products Pose Danger

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An examination of poisoning cases in Hong Kong linked to over-the-counter (OTC) weight loss products often advertised to contain only "natural" ingredients" revealed the products to be laced with multiple illicit ingredients with toxicities that can cause illness or even death, according to a report published online Oct. 13 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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