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Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

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October 2010 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: November 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for October 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

CDC Warns Travelers of Cholera Outbreak in Haiti

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has warned those traveling to Haiti to celebrate All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day to take precautions to protect themselves from cholera.

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Original Mutation to Pancreatic Cancer May Take 10 Years

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Genomic sequencing of metastatic pancreatic cancers along with mathematical modeling suggests that there is a 10- to 15-year time period in which to find and destroy malignant pancreatic cells before the cancer becomes advanced, according to research published online Oct. 27 in Nature.

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Removing Deductible Affects Use of Preventive Screenings

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among healthy individuals, the use of first-dollar coverage -- also known as zero-deductible coverage -- may modestly improve utilization of preventive services, especially in people in low-deductible plans, according to research published online Oct. 28 in Health Services Research.

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For Coronary Patients, H2RA Plus Clopidogrel Spikes Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The concomitant use of a histamine2-receptor antagonist (H2RA) and clopidogrel for patients with prior acute coronary syndrome (ACS) more than doubles the risk of rehospitalization or death compared to treatment with clopidogrel only, according to research published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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Lifestyle Score, Decision Aid Affect Colon Cancer Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Each additional healthy lifestyle behavior can decrease colorectal cancer risk by 11 percent, according to research published online Oct. 26 in BMJ. In another article in the same issue, a decision aid to help adults with low education levels make informed colorectal cancer screening decisions appears to cause more patients to avoid the screening entirely.

Abstract - Kirkegaard
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Abstract - Smith
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Electronic Tracking Ups Capture of Endoscopy Complications

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- An electronic tracking system picks up more outpatient endoscopic-related complications requiring an emergency department visit/hospitalization than does standard physician reporting, according to research published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. These visits add substantially to the real cost of endoscopic procedures.

Abstract
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Tumor Location Affects Mortality Reduction Benefit of Colonoscopy

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Colonoscopies may significantly reduce the risk of dying from colorectal cancer (CRC), though the benefits appear limited to reducing mortality from distal, not proximal, CRC, according to research published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Colorectal Cancer Tumor Type Affects Cetuximab Response

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with colorectal cancer who have the KRAS codon 13-mutated tumor type respond better to treatment with cetuximab than patients with other KRAS-mutated tumor types, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Primary Care Trails Other Specialties in Hourly Wages

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians have substantially lower hourly wages than other specialists, and although most physicians find Medicare reimbursement inequitable, they show little consensus on how to reform it, according to two studies published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Leigh
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Abstract - Federman
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Colorectal Screening Strategy for Minority Women Tested

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Offering colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) to low-income minority women during mammography visits can be an effective way to increase screening in this population, but a lack of medical insurance remains an important barrier for many women, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Infections Exert Heavy Mortality Toll in Cirrhosis

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with cirrhosis, infections are associated with a steep increase in one-year mortality risk, according to research published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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Low-Dose Aspirin Can Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term, low-dose aspirin intake may reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) by nearly a quarter, and the risk of death from CRC by more than a third, according to research published online Oct. 22 in The Lancet.

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Most PCPs Not Following Colorectal Screening Guidelines

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than one-fifth of primary care physicians (PCPs) comply with practice guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, according to the results of a National Cancer Institute survey published online Oct. 14 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Baraclude Sanctioned for Severe Liver Disease

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Bristol-Myers Squibb said Monday its liver drug Baraclude (entecavir) has received expanded approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat chronic hepatitis B in adults with decompensated liver disease, a form of severe liver damage.

hepatitis B

Prolonged Diarrhea Accounts for Substantial Disease Burden

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged episodes of acute diarrhea (ProD), lasting seven to 13 days, account for a substantial portion of the diarrhea burden in challenged populations and appear to be associated with an increased risk of subsequent persistent diarrhea and malnutrition, according to research published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Experimental HCV Drug Combination Shows Potential

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental oral drug combination appears to be well-tolerated and safe, showing promising antiviral activity for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Religiosity May Improve Survival After Liver Transplant

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals who undergo a liver transplant, religiosity is associated with prolonged survival after transplantation, according to a study published in the October issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Omeprazole Shows Benefit With Aspirin, Clopidogrel

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Omeprazole may be associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking aspirin and clopidogrel, without a significant increase in risk of cardiovascular events, according to research published online Oct. 6 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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