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Category: Gynecology | Monthly Briefing

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October 2010 Briefing - OBGYN & Women’s Health

Last Updated: November 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for October 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Green Tea Does Not Prevent Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although animal and in vitro studies have shown green tea to be protective against breast cancer, a large prospective trial in Japan has found no such benefit; the findings have been published online Oct. 28 in Breast Cancer Research.

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Removing Deductible Affects Use of Preventive Screenings

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among healthy individuals, the use of first-dollar coverage -- also known as zero-deductible coverage -- may modestly improve utilization of preventive services, especially in people in low-deductible plans, according to research published online Oct. 28 in Health Services Research.

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IUD Expulsion Risk Greater With Postpartum Insertion

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who have a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (IUD) inserted immediately after delivery are much more likely to expel the device in the months after delivery than women who delay insertion, but IUD use six months after delivery is similar in the two groups, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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2 mm Free Margin Minimizes Risk of Residual Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A free margin of 2 mm from the invasive tumor appears to be associated with a low risk of residual disease in patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery, according to research published in the November issue of the International Journal of Clinical Practice.

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Primary Care Trails Other Specialties in Hourly Wages

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians have substantially lower hourly wages than other specialists, and although most physicians find Medicare reimbursement inequitable, they show little consensus on how to reform it, according to two studies published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Leigh
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Abstract - Federman
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Colorectal Screening Strategy for Minority Women Tested

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Offering colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) to low-income minority women during mammography visits can be an effective way to increase screening in this population, but a lack of medical insurance remains an important barrier for many women, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Cancer.

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Teens With Both-Sex Partners Engage in Risky Behaviors

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 sexually active adolescents reports a same-sex partner, and those who have partners of both sexes report behaviors that put them at risk for sexually transmitted infections, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Elective Bilateral Salpingo-Oophorectomy Has Decreased

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of women electing to undergo bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy has dropped significantly since 2002 after increasing in prior years, though the risks versus the benefits have not been clearly established, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Bacteriuria Unrelated to Painful Bladder Syndrome Flares

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Episodes of bacteria in the urine (bacteriuria) do not seem to be related to symptoms of painful bladder syndrome (PBS) in women with interstitial cystitis (IC), according to a study in the October issue of Urology.

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Eye Damage Seen in Anorexia Nervosa

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Anorexia nervosa (AN) may cause serious eye damage, even without noticeable vision loss, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Spinal Fractures Spotlighted During World Osteoporosis Day

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Spinal fractures worldwide occur at an estimated rate of one every 22 seconds, and health care professionals need to be able to recognize the signs of these fractures in their patients, according to the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) report, The Breaking Spine.

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More Node+ Breast Cancer, Higher Mortality After HRT

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal estrogen-plus-progestin therapy not only results in an increased incidence of invasive breast cancers but also in more node-positive cancers and an increased mortality rate, according to an analysis published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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DHA Supplements Don't Prevent Postpartum Depression

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The results of the large, multicenter DOMInO (DHA to Optimize Mother Infant Outcome) trial do not support routine docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation for pregnant women to reduce depressive symptoms or to improve cognitive or language outcomes in early childhood, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Researchers Identify Most Common HPV Types

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Eight types of human papillomavirus (HPV) appear to be responsible for over 90 percent of the world's cervical cancer cases; researchers recommend these eight types be the target for future vaccines and that the three most common high-risk HPV types -- 16, 18, and 45 -- which occur in younger women, should be the focus of type-specific HPV screening. Their findings have been published online Oct. 18 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Soy Lowers Recurrence Rate in Some Types of Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Although concerns have been raised in recent years about the potential adverse effect of soy consumption on estrogen- and progesterone-receptor positive breast cancers, new research has shown a lower risk for recurrence of these cancers for women who consume high amounts of soy isoflavones; the study has been published online Oct. 18 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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"Natural" Weight Loss Products Pose Danger

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An examination of poisoning cases in Hong Kong linked to over-the-counter (OTC) weight loss products often advertised to contain only "natural" ingredients" revealed the products to be laced with multiple illicit ingredients with toxicities that can cause illness or even death, according to a report published online Oct. 13 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Diabetes Hospitalizations Rise Among Young Adults

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizations associated with diabetes have significantly increased among young adults, in particular young women, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Women's Health.

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Fibromyalgia Sufferers May Benefit From Yoga Practice

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga might provide an effective counterpart to pharmacotherapy in helping patients cope with and manage fibromyalgia, according to research published in the November issue of Pain.

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Sex Practices Driving Surge in HPV-Linked Oral Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Changing sexual practices, including increased oral sex, multiple sex partners, and an early start of sexual activity, are behind an epidemic of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) linked to sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), according to an article in the November issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Studies Assess Regimens After Nevirapine

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In women with HIV-1 who have taken peripartum single-dose nevirapine, the use of ritonavir-boosted lopinavir with tenofovir-emtricitabine is associated with better outcomes than therapy featuring nevirapine, and in children with prior nevirapine exposure, benefits are seen with zidovudine and lamivudine plus ritonavir-boosted lopinavir, according to two studies published in the Oct. 14 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Lockman
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Abstract - Palumbo
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Bisphosphonate Users at Possible Risk of Thigh Fracture

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphosphonates may put users at risk for atypical thigh bone fractures, according to a warning to health care providers and patients issued Oct. 13 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; the risk will be reflected in a labeling change and Medication Guide.

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Bisphosphonates Up Risk of A-Fib in Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Older cancer patients who receive intravenous bisphosphonate therapy may be at a modestly increased risk for atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), and stroke, according to research published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Advanced Cancer Patients Still Getting Cancer Screenings

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced cancer continue to undergo common cancer screening tests that are unlikely to provide benefit because of their shortened life expectancy, according to research published in the Oct. 13 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Midwife Training Programs Cut Neonatal Deaths in Zambia

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Two midwife training programs significantly decreased the seven-day neonatal death rate in community health clinics in Zambia, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Pediatrics.

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Neonatal Jaundice Ups Risk of Infantile Autism

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal jaundice appears to increase the risk of autism and other psychological development disorders, but only for a subset of term infants, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Pediatrics.

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New White Paper Issued on Ovarian Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO) has issued a comprehensive white paper -- as part the organization's professional GynecoLogic Cancer Collaborative education program -- that provides an overview of and background on the screening, diagnosis, and management of ovarian cancer. The report is published in the October issue of Gynecologic Oncology.

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Lifestyle Can Lower Breast CA Risk Despite Family History

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Following American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines for physical activity, alcohol consumption, and body weight provides similar benefits for postmenopausal women with and without a family history of later-onset breast cancer (FHLBC), according to research published online Oct. 12 in Breast Cancer Research.

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Estrogen Replacement Raises Kidney Stone Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen therapy appears to significantly increase the risk of kidney stone formation in healthy postmenopausal women, according to research published Oct. 11 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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More Than One-Third of Women With Epilepsy Infertile

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For women with epilepsy, the risk of infertility increases with each additional antiepileptic drug (AED), and more than a third may be unable to conceive, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Neurology.

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Breast Cancer Treatment Race Disparities Not Socioeconomic

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Racial and ethnic differences in adherence to guideline-recommended breast cancer diagnostics and care remain even after adjustment for insurance coverage and socioeconomic status (SES), according to research published online Oct. 11 in Cancer.

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Light Drinking in Pregnancy Not a Cause of Childhood Problems

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- At age 5, children of women who were light drinkers during pregnancy do not have higher risk of socioemotional or cognitive deficits than those of women who did not drink at all in pregnancy, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Obesity Drug Pulled From U.S. Market

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Abbott Laboratories, maker of Meridia (sibutramine), agreed to voluntarily withdraw the obesity drug from the market because it might place users at increased risk of heart attack and stroke, according to an Oct. 8 announcement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Low Apgar Scores Associated With Cerebral Palsy

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Low Apgar scores at birth appear to be strongly associated with the development of cerebral palsy, more so in children of normal birth weight than those of low birth weight, according to research published Oct. 7 in BMJ.

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Faith-Based Intervention Facilitates Lifestyle Change

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Sisters in Motion, a faith-based intervention designed to increase walking and lower blood pressure in older, sedentary African-American women appears to be effective, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
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Pregnancy Depression Linked to Adverse Birth Outcomes

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal depression during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of preterm birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW), though the strength of the relationship varies by country, measurement of depression, and, in the United States, socioeconomic status, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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More Evidence Links Dense Breasts to Later Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and mammographically dense breasts may have an increased risk of subsequent breast cancer, particularly in the opposite breast, according to research published in the October issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Cesarean Rates in England Vary Considerably

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of cesarean deliveries among different National Health Service (NHS) trusts in England found that, while maternal characteristics differ among the trusts, variation remains, even after adjusting for these characteristics. The researchers recommend examining issues linked to emergency procedures; their work was published Oct. 6 in BMJ.

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Artemether-Lumefantrine As Effective As Quinine

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of artemether and lumefantrine appears to be better tolerated than, and as effective as, oral quinine for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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U.S. Teen Birth Rate Levels Off After Steady Decline

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The teen birth rate in the United States declined progressively for about a decade but appears to have leveled off for most demographic groups while rising among older Hispanic teens, according to research published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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New Method Could Improve in Vitro Fertilization Outcomes

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A noninvasive imaging approach for predicting which embryos will reach the blastocyst phase could be useful in assessing the potential of embryos during assisted reproduction, according to research published online Oct. 3 in Nature Biotechnology.

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Successful Fat Loss May Require Adequate Sleep

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight dieters who don't get enough sleep may lose less fat and more fat-free body mass while experiencing greater hunger than those who get adequate nightly rest, according to research published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Flu Vaccine in Pregnancy Reduces Infants' Infection Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Women who receive a seasonal influenza vaccination while pregnant may be sparing their infants from risk of influenza, influenza-like illness (ILI), and related hospitalization, according to research published online Oct. 4 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Study Highlights U.S. Adult and Adolescent Sexual Behaviors

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Initial findings from the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB), published in nine separate research articles in a special October issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine, highlight the sexual behaviors and condom use of U.S. adolescents and adults.

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Doctors' Exercise Linked to Confidence Counseling Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' exercise habits and weight are associated with their confidence in their abilities to counsel patients on exercise and diet, as is the level of training they have received in counseling techniques, according to research published in the fall issue of Preventive Cardiology.

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Early Pregnancy Sleep Duration Tied to Hypertension Risks

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Both short and long sleep durations during early pregnancy are associated with elevated blood pressure (BP) as well as increased risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia during the third trimester, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of SLEEP.

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Empowerment Strategy May Be Beneficial for IVF Decision

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A strategy to empower couples seeking in vitro fertilization (IVF) to decide how many embryos to transfer could increase the number who use single-embryo transfer, therefore reducing the twin pregnancy rate, according to research published Sept. 30 in BMJ.

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No Benefit to Early Chemo in Ovarian Cancer Relapse

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- For women whose ovarian cancer has been in remission, restarting chemotherapy early on the basis of heightened CA125 concentration does not improve survival compared with postponing treatment until symptoms of relapse appear, according to a study published in the Oct. 2, cancer-themed issue of The Lancet.

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Modest Drinking Tied to Lower Cardiac Death Risk in Women

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Lower levels of alcohol intake are associated with a significantly reduced risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among women, according to research published in the October issue of Heart Rhythm.

Abstract
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