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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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October 2010 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: November 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for October 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Associations Found Between ADHD and Adulthood BMI

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who report symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at risk for obesity in adulthood, according to research published online Oct. 26 in the International Journal of Obesity.

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Video, TV, Gamer Violence Desensitizes Teenage Boys

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent boys who watch violent movies or television programs or play violent video games may become desensitized to aggression, which could promote aggressive attitudes and behaviors, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.

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CDC: Second Dose of Meningitis Vaccine Recommended

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices panel has recommended that 16-year-olds get a meningitis booster shot, as the vaccine does not appear to last as long as previously thought.

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CDC: Whooping Cough Vaccine Recommended for Elderly

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended that adults aged 65 years and older who are in close contact with infants be vaccinated against whooping cough.

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Majority of Infants Sleep Through the Night at 5 Months

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A set of criteria can be used by pediatricians to reassure new parents that their infant is likely to sleep through the night -- on the parents' sleep schedule -- by the age of 5 months, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Primary Care Trails Other Specialties in Hourly Wages

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians have substantially lower hourly wages than other specialists, and although most physicians find Medicare reimbursement inequitable, they show little consensus on how to reform it, according to two studies published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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New Bivalent Poliovirus Vaccine Appears Effective

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A novel bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV) against poliovirus types 1 and 3 appears to be superior to trivalent OPV (tOPV) and non-inferior to monovalent type 1 OPV (mOPV1) and mOPV3, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet.

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Teens With Both-Sex Partners Engage in Risky Behaviors

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 sexually active adolescents reports a same-sex partner, and those who have partners of both sexes report behaviors that put them at risk for sexually transmitted infections, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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H1N1 Pandemic in 2010/2011 Season Unlikely

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers analyzing H1N1 antibody levels after the 2009 pandemic have determined that a third wave in 2010 is unlikely, though people aged 50 to 79 may be more vulnerable; their findings, which support shifting vaccination prioritization from young people to older people, have been published online Oct. 18 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Autism Prevalence Rising Rapidly in Some Schools

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In Wisconsin, the number of children with autism is increasing in school districts with low baseline prevalence, while other school districts are seeing a leveling off in their numbers, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Strength Training Generally Effective in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Resistance training can lead to significantly increased muscular strength in children, but the biggest effect is seen in those who are more physically mature, train longer, and perform more sets, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Children Comprise Two-Thirds of ER Visits for Drug Ingestion

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children under the age of 5 made up two-thirds of emergency department visits for accidental ingestion of drugs in 2008, according to a new report issued by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Vaccination Rate Down in Privately-Insured Children

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination rates among children with private health insurance have decreased -- possibly because of unproven fears that vaccines cause autism -- and rates among children with Medicaid have increased, according to the new State of Health Care Quality report released by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA).

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High-Risk Teens, Parents Underreport Illicit Drug Use

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reports of illicit drug use by high-risk teens and reports of teen drug use by parents are substantially lower than actual drug use as determined objectively by analysis of hair samples, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Pediatric Hospitalizations for ATV Injuries on the Rise

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Since the first four-wheeled all-terrain vehicle (ATV) debuted in the mid-1980s, pediatric injuries and deaths related to the use of ATVs have increased notably, more than doubling between 1997 and 2006, according to research published online October 18 in the Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care.

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Functional MRI Helps Distinguish Pediatric Mental Disorders

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to observe brain activity related to emotional responses and working memory can help distinguish between pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conditions which may have similar symptoms in children, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Update on Iron Deficiency in Infants and Toddlers Issued

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have updated a policy statement on diagnosing and preventing iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in children up to age 3 based on data from an extensive literature review; their report has been published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Eye Damage Seen in Anorexia Nervosa

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Anorexia nervosa (AN) may cause serious eye damage, even without noticeable vision loss, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Season of First Trimester Associated With Food Allergy

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children who were at about 11 weeks gestational age during springtime allergy season may be at increased risk for sensitivity to food allergies, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Neuro/Endothelial Effects of Sleep Apnea Coexist in Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive dysfunction and endothelial dysfunction usually coexist in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), raising the possibility of using the simple measurement of microvascular postischemic reperfusion of the forearm as a screen for cognitive defects as well, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Children With Food Allergies May Face More Bullying

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children and teens with food allergies are at increased risk of bullying and harassment, according to a report published in the October issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Alcohol, Marijuana Use Linked to Youths' Cognitive Problems

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy alcohol consumption, as well as marijuana use, appears to affect cognitive development in adolescents, according to research published online Oct. 19 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Pneumococcal Meningitis Remains Cause of Deafness

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although pneumococcal vaccination has reduced invasive disease, pneumococcal meningitis as a cause of deafness among children has not been eliminated, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Physician Assistant, Nurse Roles in Pediatric Care Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- With a shortage of pediatric physicians looming, nurse practitioners and physician assistants may increasingly be called on to deliver pediatric care, but these health care providers may lack the numbers and experience to fill the breach, according to a series of reports published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Newborn Hearing Screening Associated With Benefits

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Newborn hearing screening -- compared to distraction hearing screening -- is associated with improved developmental outcomes in 3- to 5-year-olds with permanent hearing impairment, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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DHA Supplements Don't Prevent Postpartum Depression

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The results of the large, multicenter DOMInO (DHA to Optimize Mother Infant Outcome) trial do not support routine docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation for pregnant women to reduce depressive symptoms or to improve cognitive or language outcomes in early childhood, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Medicaid Reimbursement Rate Affects Flu Shots for Children

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Higher Medicaid reimbursement rates for influenza vaccine administration are associated with an increase in the number of low-income level children who will receive one, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Offspring of Maternal Suicides at Risk for Suicide Attempt

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children who lose a mother to suicide appear to be at increased risk for suicide attempt-related hospitalization compared with children who lose a mother to a fatal accident, but this association doesn't hold for children who lose a father to suicide, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Compares Accuracy of Fever Screening Systems

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Two of three infrared thermal detection systems (ITDS) tested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reliably distinguish people with and without fever better than individual self reports, according to research published in the November issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Bed Sharing Linked to Higher Rate of Breast-Feeding

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The potential hazard of bed sharing with infants has led many professionals to recommend against it, but researchers who have found a relationship between bed sharing and breast-feeding suggest this relationship be taken into account; their findings have been published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Hypertensive Black Children at Higher Risk Than Non-Blacks

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- African-American children with primary hypertension have clinical characteristics that place them at higher risk of developing heart disease than non-African-American children, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Epidemiology of Multiple-, Single-Child Autism Described

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Though some families have a single child with autism spectrum disorder, other families have multiple autistic children or otherwise normal children with some autistic traits, suggesting differing genetic bases for the condition, according to a study published Oct. 1 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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FDA Issues Warnings About Unapproved "Chelation" Drugs

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and consumers that no evidence has proved that nonprescription "chelation" products actually rid the body of toxic metals and can treat a variety of serious conditions and diseases.

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Prolonged Diarrhea Accounts for Substantial Disease Burden

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged episodes of acute diarrhea (ProD), lasting seven to 13 days, account for a substantial portion of the diarrhea burden in challenged populations and appear to be associated with an increased risk of subsequent persistent diarrhea and malnutrition, according to research published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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Brain Hemisphere Connectivity Differs for Males With Autism

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have identified differences in the way the hemispheres of the brain communicate with each other in males with autism compared with normally developing males, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Cerebral Cortex.

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Sex Practices Driving Surge in HPV-Linked Oral Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Changing sexual practices, including increased oral sex, multiple sex partners, and an early start of sexual activity, are behind an epidemic of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) linked to sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), according to an article in the November issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Disabled, Ill Youths at Higher Risk of Being Bullied

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with disabilities or chronic illness appear more likely to be bullied, with certain social and family factors affecting their risk, according to research published online Oct. 8 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Mass Media Likely Tied to Health Risks in Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Media education may reduce harmful effects associated with mass media exposure among children and adolescents and promote beneficial outcomes, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics published in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Studies Assess Regimens After Nevirapine

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In women with HIV-1 who have taken peripartum single-dose nevirapine, the use of ritonavir-boosted lopinavir with tenofovir-emtricitabine is associated with better outcomes than therapy featuring nevirapine, and in children with prior nevirapine exposure, benefits are seen with zidovudine and lamivudine plus ritonavir-boosted lopinavir, according to two studies published in the Oct. 14 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Lockman
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IOM: Front-of-Package Nutrition Labels Need New Focus

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Front-of-package (FOP) nutrition labeling would be most helpful to consumers if it clearly highlighted the information of greatest concern -- calories, saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium -- according to the findings of an Institute of Medicine committee review released Oct. 13.

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Midwife Training Programs Cut Neonatal Deaths in Zambia

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Two midwife training programs significantly decreased the seven-day neonatal death rate in community health clinics in Zambia, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Pediatrics.

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Limited Screen Time Best Even for Active Children

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Watching TV or using a computer for more than two hours each day increases a child's risk of psychological difficulties, and the risk is even higher if the child is not physically active, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Pediatrics.

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Neonatal Jaundice Ups Risk of Infantile Autism

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal jaundice appears to increase the risk of autism and other psychological development disorders, but only for a subset of term infants, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Pediatrics.

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Light Drinking in Pregnancy Not a Cause of Childhood Problems

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- At age 5, children of women who were light drinkers during pregnancy do not have higher risk of socioemotional or cognitive deficits than those of women who did not drink at all in pregnancy, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Low Apgar Scores Associated With Cerebral Palsy

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Low Apgar scores at birth appear to be strongly associated with the development of cerebral palsy, more so in children of normal birth weight than those of low birth weight, according to research published Oct. 7 in BMJ.

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Mother's Stress Levels Affect Child's Asthma Status

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Different types of emotional stress and coping behaviors among mothers may have different impacts on children's asthma status, according to a study published Oct. 7 in BioPsychoSocial Medicine.

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Flu Vaccination Can Prevent Future Epidemic Wave

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination can mitigate the impact of additional waves in an influenza epidemic even when it appears an epidemic is subsiding, according to research published online Oct. 5 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Family-Based Treatment Improves Adolescent Anorexia

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A family-based treatment (FBT) approach appears to be more effective in facilitating full remission over the longer term than an adolescent-focused individual therapy (AFT) approach for adolescents with anorexia nervosa, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Rates Up Slightly in Children

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Seasonal influenza vaccination coverage rates among children were low for the 2009/2010 season, though they did increase some over the 2008/2009 season, and, from June through September of 2010, low levels of influenza activity were reported, according to two reports published in the Oct. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Many Americans Do Not Plan to Receive Flu Vaccination

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Almost all physicians plan to get vaccinated against influenza this season and most also discuss the vaccine with patients. However, more than 40 percent of Americans in general do not plan to get vaccinated this season, many of whom have misconceptions about the vaccine or the disease, according to survey results announced by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) at an Oct. 7 news conference.

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Diagnostic X-Ray Exposure Linked to Childhood Leukemia

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal diagnostic X-ray exposure may be associated with an increased risk of childhood acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), specifically B-cell ALL, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

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Pediatric Residents Often Choose Career Paths Early

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Most pediatricians make their choice between a career in general pediatrics or fellowship training prior to the start of their residency, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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U.S. Teen Birth Rate Levels Off After Steady Decline

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The teen birth rate in the United States declined progressively for about a decade but appears to have leveled off for most demographic groups while rising among older Hispanic teens, according to research published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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ADHD, Conduct Disorder Tied to Later Substance Use Problems

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at risk for adulthood substance use disorders (SUDs), particularly if they have conduct disorder (CD) as well, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Neighborhood Factors Tied to Adolescents' Activity Levels

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The characteristics of an adolescent's neighborhood and his or her perception of it can affect the tendency to engage in active or sedentary behaviors, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Binge Drinking Common in U.S. Adults, High School Students

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Binge drinking occurs among about a quarter of high school students and adults 18 to 34 years of age and is reported by more than 33 million U.S. adults every year, and the levels do not appear to be declining, according to a report published Oct. 5 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Investigations May Not Lower Risk of Child Maltreatment

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The investigation of suspected child maltreatment by Child Protective Services does not appear to result in an improvement in modifiable risk factors for child maltreatment, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Children With ADHD at Risk for Depression, Suicide Later

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have more than a four-fold increased risk of depression and a nearly four-fold increased risk of suicide attempt by age 18, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Flu Vaccine in Pregnancy Reduces Infants' Infection Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Women who receive a seasonal influenza vaccination while pregnant may be sparing their infants from risk of influenza, influenza-like illness (ILI), and related hospitalization, according to research published online Oct. 4 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Study Highlights U.S. Adult and Adolescent Sexual Behaviors

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Initial findings from the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB), published in nine separate research articles in a special October issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine, highlight the sexual behaviors and condom use of U.S. adolescents and adults.

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No Single Standard for Faces Pain Scales for Children

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- There is no single faces pain scale for use in children that is superior to the others in all respects, according to an article published online Oct. 4 in Pediatrics.

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IBM Children's Health Rebate Improves Family Health

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An employer cash-incentive family health program can help motivate families to eat better, exercise more, and cut back on sedentary pursuits, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Pediatrics.

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Immunosuppressive Regimen Treats Pediatric Brain Illness

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Immunosuppressive therapy may improve long-term neurological outcomes in children with childhood primary angiitis of the central nervous system (CNS), according to research published online Oct. 4 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Doctors' Exercise Linked to Confidence Counseling Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' exercise habits and weight are associated with their confidence in their abilities to counsel patients on exercise and diet, as is the level of training they have received in counseling techniques, according to research published in the fall issue of Preventive Cardiology.

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Dog Ownership Reduces Risk of Eczema in Dog-Sensitive Children

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Early household exposure to dogs in children who are dog-sensitized results in a four-fold decreased risk of eczema, but early exposure to cats in cat-sensitive children sharply increases the risk of eczema, according to a report published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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