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Category: Nephrology | Monthly Briefing

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October 2010 Briefing - Nephrology

Last Updated: November 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for October 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Kidney Stone Risks for Gastric Surgeries Compared

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Obese patients who undergo gastric banding or sleeve gastrectomy to lose weight are less likely to form kidney stones after the procedure than patients who have the more invasive Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, according to a study in the October issue of Urology.

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Poor Social Support May Hurt Kidney Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Dialysis patients may be more vulnerable to premature death, low physical quality of life, and lack of adherence to doctors' recommendations if they have little support from family and friends, according to research published online Oct. 21 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Primary Care Trails Other Specialties in Hourly Wages

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians have substantially lower hourly wages than other specialists, and although most physicians find Medicare reimbursement inequitable, they show little consensus on how to reform it, according to two studies published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Leigh
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Abstract - Federman
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Biomarkers May Help Predict Chronic Kidney Disease

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A panel including circulating homocysteine and several other biomarkers may help predict risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and microalbuminuria (MA), according to research published online Oct. 21 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Individual BP Goal May Affect Mortality for Dialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients on hemodialysis, age, race, and diabetes status may affect the relationship between blood pressure and mortality, according to research published online Oct. 14 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Muscle Mass Predicts Health, Survival in Dialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) tend to fare better when they're heavier rather than lighter; new research indicates that these patients benefit from increased muscle mass. The findings were published online Oct. 14 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Estrogen Replacement Raises Kidney Stone Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen therapy appears to significantly increase the risk of kidney stone formation in healthy postmenopausal women, according to research published Oct. 11 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Nightly Blood Pressure Dosing Improves Outcomes

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of at least one blood pressure (BP) medication at night instead of upon waking appears to significantly improve BP control, decrease the prevalence of non-dipping, and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, according to a study published in the September issue of Chronobiology International.

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Rolofylline Not Found to Help Acute Heart Failure Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The adenosine A1-receptor antagonist rolofylline does not appear beneficial in treating acute heart failure patients with renal dysfunction, according to research published in the Oct. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Dialysis Facility Characteristics Influence Patient Survival

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The difference in patient survival rates among dialysis centers could be due to facility characteristics such as patient engagement, physician communication, and staff coordination, according to research published online Sept. 30 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Impaired Kidney Function Linked to Future Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is associated with later risk of stroke, and even early stages of chronic kidney disease are associated with a higher risk of subsequent coronary heart disease, according to research published Sept. 30 in BMJ.

Abstract - Lee
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Abstract - Di Angelantonio
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Type of Hemodialysis Access Affects Hospitalization Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term hemodialysis patients who switch from catheter access to either fistula or graft access are significantly less likely to be hospitalized than patients who continue with catheter access, according to a report published online Sept. 30 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Depression, Activity Tied to Work Status After Dialysis

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who remain employed after starting dialysis are less likely to experience possible or probable depression than those who quit working, and higher activity level is associated with a greater likelihood of continued employment, according to a report published online Sept. 30 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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