Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Geriatrics | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

October 2010 Briefing - Geriatrics

Last Updated: November 01, 2010.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Geriatrics for October 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA: Methotrexate Injection Vials Recalled

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Sandoz have notified health care professionals of a voluntary recall of 24 lots of methotrexate injection (50 mg/2 mL and 250 mg/10 mL vials) due to the presence of small glass particulates in a limited number of vials in four lots.

More Information

Pneumonia Vaccination Rate Has Increased in Older Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The number of elderly Americans who get vaccinated against pneumonia has increased, but the proportion is still less than 60 percent, and disparities exist among ethnic and racial groups, according to the 2009 National Healthcare Disparities Report, published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

More Information

Many Factors Found to Predict Hospital Readmission

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to having a chronic disease, many factors, including race, type of payer, depressive symptoms, and even body mass index (BMI), increase the risk of hospital readmission, according to research published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract - Allaudeen
Full Text
Abstract - Mudge
Full Text

Sodium Intake in U.S. Adults Not Seen to Fall Over Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Based on data dating back to the 1950s, sodium intake among adults in the United States appears to exceed recommended intakes, with no evident decrease over time, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Green Tea Does Not Prevent Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although animal and in vitro studies have shown green tea to be protective against breast cancer, a large prospective trial in Japan has found no such benefit; the findings have been published online Oct. 28 in Breast Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text

CDC: Whooping Cough Vaccine Recommended for Elderly

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended that adults aged 65 years and older who are in close contact with infants be vaccinated against whooping cough.

More Information

For Coronary Patients, H2RA Plus Clopidogrel Spikes Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The concomitant use of a histamine2-receptor antagonist (H2RA) and clopidogrel for patients with prior acute coronary syndrome (ACS) more than doubles the risk of rehospitalization or death compared to treatment with clopidogrel only, according to research published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Red Yeast Rice Supplements Lacking Standardization

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Red yeast rice, a popular dietary supplement for reducing cholesterol, contains widely differing concentrations of monacolins, the active ingredients, by brand, and some contain a potentially toxic substance, according to research published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lifestyle Score, Decision Aid Affect Colon Cancer Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Each additional healthy lifestyle behavior can decrease colorectal cancer risk by 11 percent, according to research published online Oct. 26 in BMJ. In another article in the same issue, a decision aid to help adults with low education levels make informed colorectal cancer screening decisions appears to cause more patients to avoid the screening entirely.

Abstract - Kirkegaard
Full Text
Abstract - Smith
Full Text
Editorial

Sepsis in Elderly Linked to Lost Cognition, Functionality

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients who are hospitalized for severe sepsis are at increased risk of substantial new cognitive impairment and diminished functionality, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Smoking in Midlife Linked to Later Dementia Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who smoke heavily in midlife appear to have a higher risk of dementia -- including Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia -- decades later, according to research published online Oct. 25 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Primary Care Trails Other Specialties in Hourly Wages

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians have substantially lower hourly wages than other specialists, and although most physicians find Medicare reimbursement inequitable, they show little consensus on how to reform it, according to two studies published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Leigh
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Federman
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Barbershop Program Linked to Blood Pressure Benefits

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A program in which barbers with predominantly African-American clients conduct blood pressure monitoring and referral may improve hypertension control among black men, according to research published online Oct. 25 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

H1N1 Pandemic in 2010/2011 Season Unlikely

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers analyzing H1N1 antibody levels after the 2009 pandemic have determined that a third wave in 2010 is unlikely, though people aged 50 to 79 may be more vulnerable; their findings, which support shifting vaccination prioritization from young people to older people, have been published online Oct. 18 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

HealthGrades: Lower Mortality Seen at High-Ranked Hospitals

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients at hospitals performing better than average on a variety of procedures and diagnoses have a lower risk of mortality compared to patients at low-performing hospitals, according to research released Oct. 20 by HealthGrades.

More Information

Low Testosterone Linked With CVD-Related Mortality

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests a link between low testosterone levels and increased risk of death in men who have heart disease, according to a report published online Oct. 19 in Heart.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New Guidelines for Recurrent Stroke Prevention Published

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A joint committee representing the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association has published updated evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of ischemic stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack; the statement has been published online Oct. 21 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text

Mouse Study Links Proteins to Progressive Hearing Loss

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The development of hair cell stereocilia needed for hearing can proceed normally in the absence of either β-actin or γ-actin proteins, but the lack of either protein results in progressive hearing loss with aging, according to a study in mice published Oct. 14 in PLoS Genetics.

Full Text

Weekly INR Self-Testing Not Superior to Monthly Clinic Tests

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients using warfarin, self-testing of international normalized ratio (INR) doesn't appear superior to clinic testing for reducing the risk of adverse outcomes, including major bleeding and stroke, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pradaxa Approved for Atrial Fibrillation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help prevent stroke in people with a type of abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation.

atrial fibrillation

Cardiorespiratory Fitness Linked to Cardiac Death Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although better cardiorespiratory fitness reduces the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in middle-aged and older men, adding this risk factor to a conventional risk-prediction model only modestly improves SCD prediction, according to research published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

More Node+ Breast Cancer, Higher Mortality After HRT

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal estrogen-plus-progestin therapy not only results in an increased incidence of invasive breast cancers but also in more node-positive cancers and an increased mortality rate, according to an analysis published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamin D Levels Lower in Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS), many of whom routinely protect themselves from the sun due to higher risk of skin cancer, appear to be at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Invasive Dental Procedures May Up Vascular Event Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Whether due to inflammatory effects or to a brief cessation of daily aspirin or other antiplatelet therapy, invasive dental treatments appear to be associated with a transient increased risk of a vascular event, particularly in the first four weeks after surgery, according to research published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Homocysteine, B12 Associated With Alzheimer's Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Serum levels of homocysteine (tHcy) and holotranscobalamin (holoTC) -- the active form of vitamin B12 -- may be useful in determining the risk of, and preventing, Alzheimer's disease (AD), with higher holoTC levels being a protective factor, according to research published in the Oct. 19 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Coronary Artery Calcium Aids Risk Classification in Elderly

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery calcium (CAC) levels can be used to fine-tune coronary heart disease (CHD) risk assessment in elderly people with no disease symptoms, according to a study in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Issues Warnings About Unapproved "Chelation" Drugs

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and consumers that no evidence has proved that nonprescription "chelation" products actually rid the body of toxic metals and can treat a variety of serious conditions and diseases.

More Information

Individual BP Goal May Affect Mortality for Dialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients on hemodialysis, age, race, and diabetes status may affect the relationship between blood pressure and mortality, according to research published online Oct. 14 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Pattern of MRI Findings Predicts Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have more cerebral microhemorrhages and an altered iron distribution on magnetic resonance imaging compared with controls, and analysis using a support vector machine (SVM) may identify patients with MCI at higher risk of cognitive decline, according to research published online Oct. 5 in Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bioavailable Testosterone Linked to Lower Alzheimer's Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of bioavailable testosterone may be protective against Alzheimer's disease in older men, according to research published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Stent and CABG Patients Have Similar Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with unprotected left main coronary artery (LMCA) disease who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation have similar long-term mortality risk, but a substantially higher revascularization risk, than those who undergo coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), according to a study published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fibromyalgia Sufferers May Benefit From Yoga Practice

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga might provide an effective counterpart to pharmacotherapy in helping patients cope with and manage fibromyalgia, according to research published in the November issue of Pain.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

In Elderly, Algorithm Helps Reduce Number of Medications

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A tool known as the Good Palliative-Geriatric Practice algorithm can help safely reduce the use of medications in community-dwelling elderly individuals, according to research published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Long-Distance Walking Ups Gray Matter Volume

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, more physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume years later, which in turn is linked to a lower risk of cognitive impairment, according to research published online Oct. 13 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bisphosphonate Users at Possible Risk of Thigh Fracture

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphosphonates may put users at risk for atypical thigh bone fractures, according to a warning to health care providers and patients issued Oct. 13 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; the risk will be reflected in a labeling change and Medication Guide.

More Information

IOM: Front-of-Package Nutrition Labels Need New Focus

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Front-of-package (FOP) nutrition labeling would be most helpful to consumers if it clearly highlighted the information of greatest concern -- calories, saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium -- according to the findings of an Institute of Medicine committee review released Oct. 13.

Full Text

CDC: In U.S., Hispanics Outlive General Population

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic individuals in the United States live an average 2.5 years longer than non-Hispanic white individuals and 7.7 years longer than non-Hispanic black individuals, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report United States Life Tables by Hispanic Origin, 2006, which was released today.

Full Text

Bisphosphonates Up Risk of A-Fib in Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Older cancer patients who receive intravenous bisphosphonate therapy may be at a modestly increased risk for atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), and stroke, according to research published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Prior Aspirin Use Is Marker for Recurrent MI Risk After ACS

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with a history of aspirin use who experience an incident of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at modestly higher risk of recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), but not mortality, compared with non-prior aspirin users, according to a study in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Buprenorphine Implants Effective in Opioid Dependence

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Implanted buprenorphine is an effective alternative for treatment of opioid dependency, resulting in fewer withdrawal symptoms and less treatment drop-out than placebo implants, according to research published in the Oct. 13 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Advanced Cancer Patients Still Getting Cancer Screenings

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced cancer continue to undergo common cancer screening tests that are unlikely to provide benefit because of their shortened life expectancy, according to research published in the Oct. 13 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Peripheral Artery Disease Procedures Recurrent, Costly

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Peripheral artery disease (PAD) carries a high economic burden, with many asymptomatic patients going on to experience an ischemic event requiring hospitalization and many symptomatic patients requiring one or more revascularizations and other procedures, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Estrogen Replacement Raises Kidney Stone Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen therapy appears to significantly increase the risk of kidney stone formation in healthy postmenopausal women, according to research published Oct. 11 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nightly Blood Pressure Dosing Improves Outcomes

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of at least one blood pressure (BP) medication at night instead of upon waking appears to significantly improve BP control, decrease the prevalence of non-dipping, and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, according to a study published in the September issue of Chronobiology International.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Insulin Resistance Is Potential Marker for Ischemic Stroke

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin resistance (IR), as measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), appears to be independently associated with an increased risk of first ischemic stroke (IS) among patients without diabetes, potentially providing clinical practitioners with the ability to identify those at high risk of stroke, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

B-Vitamin Therapy May Not Be Useful

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Routine supplementation with folic acid for five years has no effect on cardiovascular outcomes, cancer incidence, or mortality, according to a meta-analysis published Oct. 11 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

43% of Orthopedic Patients Have Low Vitamin D Level

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D within the adult orthopedic surgery population, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Word Choice Influences Patient Perception of Prognosis

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The way clinicians explain a patient's back pain may influence the patient's perceived prognosis and uptake of therapy; sticking with language used in radiology reports may be more helpful than using degenerative terms, such as "wear and tear," according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Informant-Based Tool Is Good Screen for Alzheimer's

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A brief informant-based dementia assessment can identify Alzheimer's disease better than more traditional methods and may be a lower-cost alternative for Alzheimer's screening, according to a report published online Sept. 7 in Brain.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Faith-Based Intervention Facilitates Lifestyle Change

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Sisters in Motion, a faith-based intervention designed to increase walking and lower blood pressure in older, sedentary African-American women appears to be effective, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Stress Testing Common in Years After Revascularization

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients undergoing coronary revascularization are likely to have a stress test in the following two years, with relatively few requiring repeat revascularization, according to research published in the Oct. 12 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Arthritis Prevalence Nearly 25 Percent in U.S. Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly a quarter of U.S. adults have doctor-diagnosed arthritis and many also have arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL); the prevalence of arthritis is particularly high among obese individuals, according to a report published in the Oct. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Many Americans Do Not Plan to Receive Flu Vaccination

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Almost all physicians plan to get vaccinated against influenza this season and most also discuss the vaccine with patients. However, more than 40 percent of Americans in general do not plan to get vaccinated this season, many of whom have misconceptions about the vaccine or the disease, according to survey results announced by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) at an Oct. 7 news conference.

More Information

Well-Being, Cardiorespiratory Fitness Key to Survival

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Low levels of negative emotion and high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are independent predictors of long-term survival, and individuals who have both are at much lower risk of premature death, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

New Insurance Criteria May Adversely Affect Apnea Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- New local coverage determination (LCD) adherence criteria for continued reimbursement of continuous positive airway pressure after 90 days among patients with obstructive sleep apnea may have a negative impact on their clinical care, according to research published in the October issue of Chest.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increasing Catheter Size Tied to Greater Thrombosis Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Previous deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and increasing catheter size are related to an increased risk for peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-associated DVT, according to a study in the October issue of Chest.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Successful Fat Loss May Require Adequate Sleep

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight dieters who don't get enough sleep may lose less fat and more fat-free body mass while experiencing greater hunger than those who get adequate nightly rest, according to research published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Mortality Predictors for Parkinson's Disease Identified

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Age at onset (AAO), chronological age, presence of dementia, motor severity, and psychosis are among the independent factors predictive of mortality in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, according to research published in the Oct. 5 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Validates Noninvasive Blood Test for CAD

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A new blood test measuring gene expression can modestly increase the accuracy of predicting obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients without diabetes or known CAD, according to research published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Consensus Statement Pushes Lower BP Goals in Blacks

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The updated International Society on Hypertension in Blacks (ISHIB) consensus statement on the management of hypertension in this population places a major emphasis on comprehensive assessment and appropriate risk stratification of individual patients with hypertension, according to a report published online Oct. 4 in Hypertension.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors' Exercise Linked to Confidence Counseling Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' exercise habits and weight are associated with their confidence in their abilities to counsel patients on exercise and diet, as is the level of training they have received in counseling techniques, according to research published in the fall issue of Preventive Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text

Impaired Kidney Function Linked to Future Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is associated with later risk of stroke, and even early stages of chronic kidney disease are associated with a higher risk of subsequent coronary heart disease, according to research published Sept. 30 in BMJ.

Abstract - Lee
Full Text
Abstract - Di Angelantonio
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Modest Drinking Tied to Lower Cardiac Death Risk in Women

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Lower levels of alcohol intake are associated with a significantly reduced risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among women, according to research published in the October issue of Heart Rhythm.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

DMARDs, Glucocorticoids, Biologics Similar for RA

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, biologics, or a combination of these agents significantly reduces radiographic evidence of joint destruction, with no advantage seen for patients whose treatment includes biologics, according to research published in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Calls for Halt on Marketing of Unapproved Colchicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ordered companies manufacturing, distributing, or marketing unapproved single-ingredient oral colchicine to cease doing so.

More Information

Copyright © 2010 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: October 2010 Briefing - Cosmetic Surgery Next: October 2010 Briefing - Pain Management

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.