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Category: Nursing | Monthly Briefing

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March 2010 Briefing - Nursing

Last Updated: April 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for March 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Disability Course in Elderly Usually Not Predictable

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- In most older people followed at the end of life, the condition leading to death isn't associated with a predictable course of disability, according to research published in the April 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Advance Directives Effectively Guide End-of-Life Care

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly persons with reduced decision-making capacity who have prepared advance directives, such as living wills, are likely to receive the kind of end-of-life care they request, according to research published in the April 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Physicians Weigh Many Factors in Surrogate Decision Making

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians making medical decisions for patients unable to decide for themselves often include factors other than expressed patient preferences in their decisions, even though most physicians consider those preferences their most important guideline, according to a study in the March issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
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Research Urged to Help Iraq, Afghanistan War Vets Readjust

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs urgently need to conduct research on how to help veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and their families readjust to post-deployment life and cope with mental health problems, as well as improve the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to Returning Home from Iraq and Afghanistan, a preliminary assessment of veterans' needs by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

Press Release
Online Text of Returning Home from Iraq and Afghanistan

Triple Regimen Plus Radiation Effective for Esophageal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, docetaxel and capecitabine plus radiation therapy before surgery is effective and relatively safe in patients with localized operable esophageal cancer, according to a study published online March 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Elderly Lung Cancer Patients Not Likely to Receive Chemo

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer are not likely to receive chemotherapy, and platinum-based doublet regimens in particular, despite their clear survival benefits, according to a study published online March 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Asclera Approved to Treat Varicose Veins

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Polidocanol (Asclera) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat small varicose veins, the agency said in a news release.

National Library of Medicine

Pediatric Endocrinologists Vary Widely in Diabetes Practices

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric endocrinologists vary widely in their management of pediatric type 2 diabetes, with younger providers likely managing the disease more aggressively, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Knee Osteoarthritis Patients Often Rely on Self-Help

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients newly diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis seek medical care, but they also institute lifestyle changes -- often without a physician's advice -- which improve their pain and function levels, according to a study in the April issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
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Delayed Intervention Ups Mortality in Coronary Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within eight hours of clinical presentation have better mortality and cardiac outcomes than those in whom the procedure is delayed, according to a study in the April 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Education Program in Primary Care Can Help Low Back Pain

TUESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with low back pain in the primary care setting, the addition of a brief education program on active management to usual care can lead to small improvements in pain, disability, and other measures, according to research published in the March 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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'Medical Home' Project Cuts Emergency Room Visits

TUESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with complex disease are less likely to be taken to the emergency room for treatment if their families are given extra support to organize their children's health care needs, and care is coordinated by one constant source such as a general pediatrician, according to a study published online March 11 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Telemonitoring Program Beneficial in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Among individuals with type 2 diabetes and inadequate glycemic control, management with a home telemonitoring program leads to larger reductions in A1C compared to a monthly care coordination phone call, though both improve glycemic control, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Imaging Detects Child Abuse Fractures With High Sensitivity

TUESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is likely more sensitive than a skeletal survey in identifying fractures due to child abuse, according to a study in the April issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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H1N1 Still Circulating, Uptick Seen in Southeastern U.S.

TUESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- The H1N1 influenza virus is still circulating throughout the United States, and there has even been an uptick in the number of cases in the southeast, health officials said during a March 29 press briefing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Regular Diabetes Screenings Should Start Early

TUESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, initiation of screening for type 2 diabetes between ages 30 and 45, with repeat screenings every three to five years, is cost effective, according to a study published online March 30 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Diabetes Ups Post-Op Mortality Risk in Cancer Patients

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients with preexisting diabetes have a greater risk of dying after surgery compared to patients without diabetes, according to research published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Colorectal Cancer in Distant Family Can Increase Risk

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Having a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) in second- and third-degree relatives can increase an individual's risk of the disease when combined with a first-degree family history, according to research published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Study Finds Minority Children Lacking in Vitamin D

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- In the southeastern United States, minority, low-income children have a high prevalence of both 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and insufficiency, with age and season significant predictors of vitamin D deficiency, according to a study published online March 29 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Racial and Ethnic Disparities Persist in Pediatric Health Care

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- There are pervasive, persistent and extensive racial/ethnic disparities that occur in every domain of pediatric health and health care, according to a technical report by the American Academy of Pediatrics published online March 29 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Antibiotic Reduces Mortality in African AIDS Patients

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Prophylactic daily administration of the inexpensive and widely-used antibiotic co-trimoxazole among HIV-infected African patients beginning triple-drug antiretroviral therapy improved mortality for up to 72 weeks after the start of treatment, according to a study published online March 29 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Children With Cancer Often Unaware of Study Participation

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric cancer patients often do not realize their treatment is part of a research study, do not have a good understanding of the research in which they are participating, and feel uninvolved in the decision-making process, according to a study published online March 29 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Anemia Increases Mortality Risk After Heart Attack

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Anemia increases the risk of death in patients who have had a heart attack and coronary angioplasty, particularly in those with multivessel disease and incomplete revascularization, according to a study in the March 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis Mostly in Line With Guidelines

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnostic imaging tests used for suspected pulmonary embolism are generally in accordance with accepted guidelines, but there is some variation by treating physician specialty and geographic location, according to research published in the April American Journal of Roentgenology.

Abstract
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Breast-Feeding in U.S. Falls Short of National Targets

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- With breast-feeding among non-Hispanic black women lagging well behind Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women, the United States has fallen short of targets for breast-feeding under the Healthy People 2010 (HP2010) health initiative, according to a report in the March 26 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Chest X-Ray Helps Predict Adverse H1N1 Outcomes

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Abnormal findings on an initial chest X-ray in patients infected with H1N1 influenza, particularly extensive involvement of both lungs, may be associated with a worse prognosis, according to research published in the April issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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Common Signals May Underlie Obesity and Drug Addiction

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Over-consumption of calorie-rich food may trigger a reaction similar to cocaine and heroin addiction-like responses, according to a study in rats published online March 28 in Nature Neuroscience.

Abstract
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Depth of Infant Head Injury Can Help Identify Cause

MONDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Head injury depth can be a useful tool to assess the causes and mechanisms of acute cranial trauma in children under 3 years of age, according to a study published online March 29 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Racial Disparities Observed in Stroke Quality of Care

FRIDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- African-American ischemic stroke patients have a moderate but consistent reduction in the frequency with which guideline-based care is provided in-hospital, according to a study published online March 22 in Circulation.

Abstract
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HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Carcinoma on the Rise

FRIDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma related to human papillomavirus (HPV) represents an emergent, distinct, and increasingly prevalent type of head and neck cancer that may ultimately affect public health policy and clinical practice, according to an editorial published March 25 in BMJ.

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Danish Study Assesses Use of Clopidogrel in Heart Failure

FRIDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have a heart attack and heart failure have a lower risk of death if treated with clopidogrel (Plavix), even though clopidogrel use is currently low in these patients, according to research published in the March 30 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

AHA Calls for New Strategies to Cut Medication Errors

FRIDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- New strategies are needed to reduce medication errors in acute cardiovascular and stroke patients, according to an American Heart Association scientific statement published online March 22 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Giving Emergency Contraception in Advance Found Ineffective

FRIDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Giving women emergency contraception in advance for use after unprotected sex does not reduce pregnancy rates or lead to changes in contraceptive methods or sexual behavior, according to a review in the March issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

Abstract
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Intensive Program Can Reduce Large Hospitals' MRSA Burden

THURSDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Over the long term, the use of an intensive program can reduce the burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a large hospital institution, according to research published in the March 22 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Diet Plus Weight Control Shown to Improve Cognition

THURSDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In hypertensive patients who are overweight and obese, combining the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet with a weight management program may improve neurocognitive function, according to a study published online March 19 in Hypertension. Another Hypertension study, published online March 8, found that perindopril may effectively reduce the risk of major vascular events in patients of any weight category with a history of stroke.

Abstract - Smith
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Abstract - Czernichow
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Four Risk Factors Linked to Life Expectancy Disparities

THURSDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Four preventable risk factors -- smoking, high blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, and overweight and obesity -- account for a significant proportion of the nation's disparities in life expectancy, according to a study published March 23 in PLoS Medicine.

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Nearly a Third of 2007 U.S. Infants Delivered by C-Section

THURSDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Almost a third of births in the United States were cesarean section deliveries in 2007, an increase of 53 percent from 1996 and the highest rate ever reported in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics' March NCHS Data Brief No. 35.

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Reaching Out for Support Tied to Lower Diabetes Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who have a propensity to reach out for social support have lower odds of dying compared to their more independent counterparts, according to a study in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Home Screening for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Popular

THURSDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Home-screening for sexually transmitted infections is far more popular than going to a clinic for screening, according to a study published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Femur Fractures Very Rare With Bisphosphonates

WEDNESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- The occurrence of subtrochanteric or diaphyseal femur fractures is very rare in women who have used bisphosphonates, even for as long as 10 years, according to an article published online March 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial

Mortality Linked to Hospital Volume in Acute Conditions

WEDNESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia is generally reduced in hospitals that handle more patients with those conditions, but there is a point of diminishing returns, according to research published in the March 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Planning Improves Compliance With End-of-Life Wishes

WEDNESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly people who have formal end-of-life planning are more likely to have their wishes followed and their families better prepared than people who do not plan ahead, according to a study published online March 23 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Danish Study Finds Mammos Don't Impact Mortality

WEDNESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of Denmark's breast cancer mortality data found no evidence that mammography screening begun in Copenhagen in 1991 and Funen county in 1993 significantly reduced breast cancer mortality in those areas compared to unscreened regions, according to a study published online March 23 in BMJ.

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Americans Sustain 1.7 Million Traumatic Brain Injuries a Year

WEDNESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a contributing factor in almost one-third of all injury-related deaths, and there are 1.7 million cases of TBI every year in the United States, according to a report published March 8 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Complementary Medicine Not Uncommon in Pediatric Cancer

TUESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is often used to treat pediatric patients with cancer, according to a review published online March 22 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Place of Service May Affect Racial Disparities in Cancer Deaths

TUESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Although elderly African-American cancer patients have a higher risk of death than elderly Caucasian cancer patients, the differences disappear among those who are treated at a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center, according to a retrospective analysis published online March 22 in Cancer.

Abstract
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U.S. Tuberculosis Rate Sharply Dropped in 2009

TUESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- In 2009, the tuberculosis rate in the United States declined to a record low, according to a report published in the March 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Anaphylaxis Often Requires Repeat Epinephrine Treatment

TUESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- In children with food-related anaphylaxis who received epinephrine prior to arrival at an emergency department, 12 percent received a second dose after arrival, according to a review published online March 22 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Continuous Glucose Monitoring Shows Benefit in Critically Ill

TUESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in critically ill patients reduces severe hypoglycemic events, but doesn't lead to better glycemic control compared to intensive insulin therapy based on an algorithm, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Stress in Pregnancy May Hike Baby's Asthma Risk

TUESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Stresses on a mother during pregnancy may affect the development of her fetus's immune system and increase the risk of the child developing asthma, according to a study published online March 1 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
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Most U.S. Infants Not Getting Enough Daily Vitamin D

TUESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Whether fed on breast milk or formula, most U.S. infants do not receive the daily intake of vitamin D recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), according to research published online March 22 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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FDA Recommends Temporary Suspension of Rotarix Vaccine

MONDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recommended that health care providers in the United States temporarily suspend use of the rotavirus vaccine Rotarix, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline, because of possible contamination by an extraneous virus.

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Psychological Health Similar for Young Cancer Survivors, Peers

MONDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancers generally report good psychological adjustment but less positive health beliefs, according to a study published online March 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Measles Outbreak Linked to Under-Vaccination

MONDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Intentional under-vaccination of children can lead to measles outbreaks, resulting in significant costs to public health agencies, medical systems, and families, according to research published online March 22 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Two Approaches, Similar Improvement in Back Pain

MONDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with chronic low back pain, a multidisciplinary group rehabilitation program and an individual therapist-assisted back strengthening program are associated with similar long-term improvements in pain and disability, according to research published in the March 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Atorvastatin Linked to Insulin Resistance, Ambient Glycemia

MONDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals with hypercholesterolemia, the use of atorvastatin is associated with higher fasting insulin and glycated hemoglobin, suggesting insulin resistance and higher ambient glycemia, according to research published in the March 23 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Updated Physician Guide on Older Drivers Released

MONDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- To enlist physicians in the effort to reduce the disproportionate rate of fatalities from car accidents among older Americans, the American Medical Association has released the second edition of the Physician's Guide to Assessing and Counseling Older Drivers.

AMA News Release
Physician's Guide to Assessing and Counseling Older Drivers

Extreme Obesity Considerable in Southern California Children

MONDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- More than half a million Southern California children are estimated to be extremely obese, raising the prospect of health problems for the individuals as they age as well as an increasing public health burden, according to a study published online March 22 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Benefits of Case Management Seen in Breast Cancer Program

FRIDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Case management for low-income women who receive free breast cancer screening and diagnostic services may reduce their time to diagnosis, according to research published online March 16 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Antiseptic Baths Reduce Infection in Critically Ill

FRIDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Bathing critically ill patients daily with cloths containing chlorhexidine reduces bacterial infections, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), as well as catheter-related infections and MRSA ventilator-associated pneumonia, according to a study in the March issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Complications Relatively Common With Neonatal CPAP

THURSDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- For patients in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), complications are relatively frequent with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), but not with cannula supplementation, according to a study in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Cancer Patients Benefit From Terminal-Diagnosis Disclosure

THURSDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with terminal cancer may have less emotional distress and a better quality of life if they are aware of their diagnosis, and standardized questionnaires may not capture common concerns in patients with inoperable lung cancer, according to two studies published online March 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract - Yun
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Abstract - Tishelman
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Smoking History Linked to Greater Eye Inflammation Risk

THURSDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Tobacco smoking history appears to be associated with a higher risk of developing uveitis, according to a study in the March issue of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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Racial Disparities in Neuro-Oncologic Care Worsen

THURSDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Access to high-quality neuro-oncologic care has worsened over time for Hispanics and blacks in the United States, even though access has improved overall, according to research in the March issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Dipstick for Kidney Disease in Children Not Cost-Effective

THURSDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- For primary care providers, dipstick urinalysis isn't a cost-effective method of screening for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children, according to research published online March 15 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Non-Toxic Lotion Effective Against Lice in Young Children

THURSDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A nontoxic lotion approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to suffocate lice is very effective in treating head lice in children as young as 6 months old, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in Pediatric Dermatology.

Abstract
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Corticosteroid Suppresses VEGF in Infantile Hemangioma

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- In a mouse model of infantile hemangioma, injections of the corticosteroid dexamethasone were able to suppress vasculogenesis by inhibiting the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), according to a study in the March 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Increased Defibrillator Access Improves Survival Rate

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- The increasing availability of public-access automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in Japan has brought faster help to people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and has improved the rate of survival without neurologic impairment, according to a study in the March 18 New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Study Recommends Higher PSA as Risk Stratification Cutoff

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- An initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 1.5 ng/ml or higher may be better than the median PSA of 0.7 ng/ml for determining the risk of prostate cancer in African-American and Caucasian men age 50 and younger, according to research reported in the March issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
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Diabetes Education Linked to Comprehensive Clinical Care

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- People with diabetes who receive diabetes self-management education (DSME) have a higher likelihood of receiving more comprehensive diabetes clinical care, according to research published in the winter issue of Diabetes Spectrum.

Abstract
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Bilateral Oophorectomy May Do More Harm Than Good

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- The decision to perform prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy at the same time as hysterectomy should be made with caution, as it may do more harm than good, especially in women not at high risk for development of ovarian or breast cancers, according to a review published in the March issue of the Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Plastic Surgery Demand Drops 2 Percent From 2008 to 2009

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the recession, almost 10 million cosmetic procedures were performed in the United States in 2009 -- only 2 percent fewer than the year before -- at a cost of almost $10.5 billion, according to a report by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.

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Integrated Care Program Beneficial in Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic low back pain, an integrated care program that combines a patient-directed and workplace-directed intervention may significantly reduce disability in private and working life, according to a study published online March 16 in BMJ.

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Staples Riskier Than Sutures After Orthopedic Surgery

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo orthopedic surgery -- especially those who undergo hip surgery -- wound closure with staples is associated with a significantly increased infection risk compared to wound closure with sutures, according to a study published March 16 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Stereotactic Body Radiation Beneficial in Lung Cancer

TUESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with early-stage but inoperable lung cancer, treatment with stereotactic body radiation therapy may significantly improve rates of tumor control, according to a study in the March 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Seniors on Adjuvant Chemo Have Less Toxic Regimens

TUESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients with colon cancer who receive adjuvant chemotherapy tend to have less-toxic and shorter chemotherapy regimens and suffer fewer adverse events than younger patients, according to a study in the March 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Palliative Care Programs Are Common But Services Limited

TUESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- While most cancer centers have palliative care programs, they offer a limited range of services and few opportunities for research or professional development, according to a study in the March 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Household H1N1 Transmission Usually Starts With Children

MONDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Early in the 2009 outbreak of pandemic H1N1 influenza, household transmission primarily occurred from children to other household members, according to a study in the April issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Gastrointestinal Symptoms Linked to Childhood Abuse

MONDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Children who have been maltreated may be at an increased risk for unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms, and this connection is partly mediated by psychological distress, according to a study in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Pediatric C. difficile-Related Hospitalizations Increasing

MONDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- In U.S. hospitals, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the pediatric population appears to be increasing, according to a study published online ahead of print in the April 4 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Extended Use of Catheters in Newborns Linked to Infection

MONDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are probably associated with a higher risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLA-BSIs) in high-risk newborns when inserted for extended periods, particularly after more than 35 days, according to research published online March 15 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Warfarin May Raise Hemorrhage Risk After Stroke Treatment

MONDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Warfarin-treated patients may be at a higher risk for symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage after treatment for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) than their counterparts not being prescribed warfarin, according to a study published online March 8 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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FDA Adds Boxed Warning to Clopidogrel Label

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has added a boxed warning to the anti-blood-clotting drug clopidogrel (Plavix) to alert consumers and health care professionals that the drug may be less effective in patients who are unable to metabolize it in order to convert it into its active form.

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Obesity and Alcohol Combined Raise Risk of Liver Disease

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity and alcohol act together to increase liver disease risk, an effect seen in both men and women, according to research published online March 11 in BMJ.

Abstract - Liu
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Abstract - Hart
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Self-Testing for HPV May Increase Detection Rates

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Providing women at high risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) who do not attend regular screening with a kit that allows them to self-collect cervicovaginal samples can help boost the reach of screening programs and the HPV detection rate, according to a study published online March 11 in BMJ.

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Article Outlines Use of PCV13 Vaccine in Young Children

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- A 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was recently licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is recommended for all children ages 2 to 59 months, as well as some older children with underlying conditions, according to a report in the March 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. According to another report in the same issue, the vaccine could greatly reduce the prevalence of pneumococcal disease in children younger than 5 years.

Report 1
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'The Pill' Doesn't Increase Overall Long-Term Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although women under 45 years of age who are recent oral contraceptive (OC) users are at slightly higher risk of mortality than their non-OC-using counterparts, overall, women who have ever used the pill have significantly lower rates of death, according to a study published online March 11 in BMJ.

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Leptin Shows Advantages Over Insulin in Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- The ability of leptin to restore hemoglobin A1c to normal in mice with diabetes (along with its additional benefits relating to body fat and cholesterol) suggests that the hormone may have a role in treating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in humans, and may have both short- and long-term advantages over insulin monotherapy, according to research published online March 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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SSRIs Show Anti-Inflammatory Benefit in RA Models

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Fluoxetine and citalopram show an anti-inflammatory benefit in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in laboratory experiments, with findings pointing toward endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) as a target for therapy in the disease, according to research published in the March issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Score Conversion Assessed

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with a coronary calcium (CAC) score of zero likely do not require frequent repeat scanning, as conversion to a score above zero is uncommon before four years, suggesting that a zero score has a four-year "warranty period," according to research published in the March 16 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Efforts Evaluated

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Significant policy and practice gaps persist in the efforts of U.S. hospitals to prevent perinatal transmission of the hepatitis B virus (HBV), according to a study published online March 8 in Pediatrics.

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Diabetic Nephropathy Classification Developed

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- A new consensus on the classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes-related nephropathy, dividing diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions with varying degrees of severity, may aid international clinical practice, according to an article published online Feb. 18 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Findings Link Variability in Blood Pressure, Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Variability in systolic blood pressure (SBP) from visit to visit and maximum SBP are predictors of stroke, and the effect of drug classes on interindividual variation in blood pressure may explain the different effects of antihypertensive drugs on stroke risk, according to research published in the March 13 issue of The Lancet.

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Predictors of Hysterectomy Use and Satisfaction Identified

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- In women with non-cancerous uterine conditions that could be treated with hysterectomy, factors such as their sexual function and attitudes regarding hysterectomy may help determine which patients are most likely to benefit from the surgery, according to research published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Hormone Therapy May Up Risk of Needing Cataract Removal

THURSDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are more likely to undergo cataract removal than their counterparts who never used HRT, and the relative risk is higher among women on HRT who also drink more than one alcoholic drink a day, according to a study in the March issue of Ophthalmology.

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Pre-Diagnosis Diet May Affect Ovarian Cancer Survival Odds

THURSDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Women treated for ovarian cancer may have better odds of survival if their pre-diagnosis diet reflects dietary recommendations for optimal nutrition and cancer prevention, according to a study in the March issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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