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Category: Orthopedics | Monthly Briefing

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March 2010 Briefing - Orthopedics

Last Updated: April 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for March 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Education Program in Primary Care Can Help Low Back Pain

TUESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with low back pain in the primary care setting, the addition of a brief education program on active management to usual care can lead to small improvements in pain, disability, and other measures, according to research published in the March 1 issue of Spine.

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Curve Correction Not Influenced By Implant Density in Scoliosis

TUESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Segmental fixation via pedicle screw constructs assists in curve correction during scoliosis surgery, with unilateral or alternate attachment yielding results similar to the more extensive bilateral attachment, according to research published in the March 1 issue of Spine.

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Imaging Detects Child Abuse Fractures With High Sensitivity

TUESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is likely more sensitive than a skeletal survey in identifying fractures due to child abuse, according to a study in the April issue of Radiology.

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Femur Fractures Very Rare With Bisphosphonates

WEDNESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- The occurrence of subtrochanteric or diaphyseal femur fractures is very rare in women who have used bisphosphonates, even for as long as 10 years, according to an article published online March 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Two Approaches, Similar Improvement in Back Pain

MONDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with chronic low back pain, a multidisciplinary group rehabilitation program and an individual therapist-assisted back strengthening program are associated with similar long-term improvements in pain and disability, according to research published in the March 1 issue of Spine.

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Increased Risk of Death Persists After Hip Fracture

THURSDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, hip fracture is associated with both a short- and long-term increased risk of death, according to a meta-analysis published in the March 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Integrated Care Program Beneficial in Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic low back pain, an integrated care program that combines a patient-directed and workplace-directed intervention may significantly reduce disability in private and working life, according to a study published online March 16 in BMJ.

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Staples Riskier Than Sutures After Orthopedic Surgery

WEDNESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo orthopedic surgery -- especially those who undergo hip surgery -- wound closure with staples is associated with a significantly increased infection risk compared to wound closure with sutures, according to a study published March 16 in BMJ.

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MRI Shows Benefit in Identifying Types of Arthritis

THURSDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show differences in synovial enhancement 15 minutes after contrast injection, suggesting that this method may be helpful in differentiating between the diseases, according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Obese Children More Likely to Incur Lower Extremity Injuries

MONDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children may be more likely to suffer from lower extremity rather than upper extremity injuries and less likely to incur head and face injuries than their non-obese counterparts, according to research published online March 1 in Pediatrics.

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Oral Drug for Post-Knee Surgery Thromboprophylaxis Assessed

FRIDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo knee replacement surgery can be given the oral medication apixaban for thromboprophylaxis instead of enoxaparin, and it is effective and confers no additional risk of bleeding, according to a study in the March 6 issue of The Lancet.

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Arthritis Prevalence Is Higher in U.S. Than in Canada

WEDNESDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Arthritis is significantly more prevalent in the United States than in Canada, especially in American women, according to a study published in the March issue of Arthritis Care & Research. Authors of the study postulate increase may be due to higher rates of obesity and physical inactivity.

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ECG Improves Sensitivity of Young Athlete Screening

TUESDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Adding 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) to preparticipation cardiovascular screening for college athletes improves overall sensitivity to detection of cardiac abnormalities and may be cost-effective, but it also increases the number of false-positive results, according to two studies published in the March 2 Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Study Assesses Costs Related to Poor Discectomy Outcomes

MONDAY, March 1 (HealthDay News) -- The costs related to poor outcomes following discectomy may be underappreciated, and technologies to improve outcomes could be cost-neutral even at a considerable price, according to research published in the February issue of The Spine Journal.

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