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RSNA: Visceral Body Fat Tied to Poor Bone Health

Last Updated: November 30, 2010.

 

Women with more visceral fat have higher bone marrow fat and lower bone mineral density

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Increased visceral body fat appears to be negatively associated with bone health, potentially serving as a risk factor for osteoporosis among premenopausal women, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, held from Nov. 28 to Dec. 3 in Chicago.

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Increased visceral body fat appears to be negatively associated with bone health, potentially serving as a risk factor for osteoporosis among premenopausal women, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, held from Nov. 28 to Dec. 3 in Chicago.

Miriam A. Bredella, M.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues evaluated abdominal subcutaneous, visceral, and total fat, as well as bone marrow fat and bone mineral density of 50 premenopausal women with various body mass indexes.

The investigators found that women with increased visceral fat had higher levels of bone marrow fat and decreased bone mineral density. However, the investigators did not find a significant correlation between subcutaneous or total fat and bone marrow fat or bone mineral density.

"Our results showed that having a lot of belly fat is more detrimental to bone health than having more superficial fat or fat around the hips," Bredella said in a statement. "It is important for the public to be aware that excess belly fat is a risk factor for bone loss, as well as heart disease and diabetes."

Abstract No. SSJ17-05
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