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Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2010 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: December 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for November 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

IBD Patients With Infection at Higher Risk for Complications

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- People with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who acquire a nosocomial infection have a significantly higher risk of mortality and increased length of stay (LOS) in the hospital, according to research published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Surgery to Remove Ingested Foreign Bodies Safe But Costly

FRIDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The ingestion of foreign bodies (FBs) is a serious and recurring problem that rarely has endoscopic complications but can be expensive to treat, according to research published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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PPI Use in Early Pregnancy Not Linked to Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) by pregnant women in the first trimester to treat the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux does not significantly increase the risk of major birth defects, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Abnormal Liver Tests May Improve With Statins

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Statins can actually improve liver function in patients with abnormal liver tests, and those patients reap substantially greater cardiovascular benefits from the drugs compared to patients who have normal liver tests, according to research published online Nov. 24 in The Lancet.

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Reallocation of Care Would Increase PCPs' Work Weeks

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Specialists spend a substantial amount of time providing routine chronic disease follow-up care, and reallocating half of this care to primary care physicians (PCPs) would add a few work weeks for each PCP, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Medical Care.

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Possible Red Flag to Predict Colorectal Cancer Identified

MONDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Large serrated polyps (LSPs) discovered during a colonoscopy are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) -- proximal CRC in particular, according to research published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Gastroenteritis Outbreak Tied to Later Health Problems

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- People who have gastroenteritis after drinking water contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter may have a higher risk of renal impairment, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension, according to research published Nov. 17 in BMJ.

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Widespread Lynch Syndrome Screening May Be Cost-Effective

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Screening unaffected individuals through demographic and family histories to determine who should be offered genetic testing for Lynch syndrome mutations may be a cost-effective approach to identifying people at higher risk for endometrial and colorectal cancer, according to research published online Nov. 18 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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U.S. Health Insurance Compared to 10 Other Nations

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults in the United States spend more time and money on health insurance than those in many other developed nations, and ultimately deal with more coverage-related disputes and denials, according to research published online Nov. 18 in Health Affairs.

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Preventive Care, Surveillance High Among CRC Survivors

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors who participate in clinical trials have better routine preventive health care and cancer screening than the general population, and also have high rates of compliance with cancer surveillance, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Intra-Abdominal Fat Predicts Hepatectomy Complications

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Use of imaging to identify patients with intra-abdominal fat, as opposed to outer-abdominal fat or mere high body mass index (BMI), may help assess risk for increased complications, including death, following major hepatectomy, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Fraud in Scientific Literature Appears Intentional

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Scientific papers retracted after publication due to fraudulent data represent a calculated, deliberate effort to deceive, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Laparoscopic Liver Resection May Beat Open Surgery

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopic liver resection for malignant tumors appears to result in fewer complications than open surgery and is associated with at least comparable long-term survival, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Combo Beats Monotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Combined sorafenib and doxorubicin appears to slow disease progression and increase overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) more effectively than doxorubicin alone, according to research published in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lactobacillus GG Linked to Benefits in Childhood IBS

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) may reduce abdominal pain in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), possibly due to improvement of the gut barrier, according to research published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Pain Linked With Poorer Prognosis in Liver Cancer

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Pain at presentation may indicate a worse prognosis for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Physician-Industry Financial Ties Decreased Since 2004

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer physicians received drug samples, food and beverages, reimbursement, or payment for professional services in 2009 than in 2004, but a large majority of physicians still report financial relationships with industry, according to research published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Combo Therapy With Ribavirin Superior in Children With Hep C

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In children and adolescents with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), the combination of peginterferon alfa-2a (PEG2a) and ribavirin is effective for achieving sustained virologic response (SVR), according to a study published online Nov. 1 in Gastroenterology.

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Chemo Combo for Biliary Tract Cancer Successful

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Cetuximab in combination with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin shows promise as a first-line palliative care treatment for biliary tract cancers and appears to increase the chance for potentially curative secondary resection, according to the results of a prospective, phase II trial published online Nov. 10 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Androgen Deprivation May Up Risk of Colorectal Cancer

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Men taking androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer may have a higher risk of colorectal cancer, and that risk appears to increase with longer duration of ADT, according to research published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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ACCF/ACG/AHA: PPIs + Antiplatelet Drugs May Be OK

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recent concerns of increased cardiac events during concomitant use, using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and antiplatelet drugs (thienopyridines) together may be appropriate treatment for patients with cardiovascular disease who are also at high risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, according to a joint Expert Consensus Document released by the American College of Cardiology Foundation, the American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Heart Association. The document was published online Nov. 8 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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CDC Compares Hep C Infection Surveillance Systems' Accuracy

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) used to track hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is not as complete or as timely as the enhanced surveillance of the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) used in some states, according to a report published Nov. 5 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Men With Diabetes Have Higher Colorectal Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Men -- but not women -- with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have a modestly increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), though insulin use is not related to a substantially increased CRC risk, according to a study in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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Studies Assess Genes in Ribavirin-Induced Anemia

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Two variants in the ITPA gene that cause inosine triphosphatase (ITPase) deficiency are linked to protection from ribavirin-induced hemolytic anemia in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and a missense substitution on the ITPA gene influences ribavirin-induced anemia in Japanese patients with the virus, according to two studies published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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Obese Children Getting New Liver Face Long-Term Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Obese pediatric patients undergoing liver transplantation have a higher risk of late mortality than normal and overweight patients, while thin and extremely thin patients have higher risk of early mortality, according to research published in the November issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Colorectal Screening Strategies for African-Americans Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Though African-Americans are less likely than other ethnic groups to be screened for colorectal cancer (CRC), interventions employing individually-tailored communications delivered in multiple ways and at multiple times may effectively improve screening rates, according to a review in the November/December issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

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Cholera Outbreak Strain in Haiti Identified

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population has received the results of laboratory testing demonstrating that the cholera strain tied to the current outbreak in Haiti, Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, is most similar to cholera strains found in South Asia. The research findings were released as part of a collaboration between Haiti's National Public Health Laboratory and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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