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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2010 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: December 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for November 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Impaired Mitochondrial Function Found in Autism

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may be more likely to have impaired mitochondrial function and abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) than children without autism, according to preliminary research published in the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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New Tool Can Help Measure Neurologic Care

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has developed a tool that can help doctors gauge the level of care they are providing for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). These quality measures have been published in the Nov. 30 issue of Neurology.

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Antiepileptic Drugs May Not Harm Breast-Fed Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children of mothers who breast-feed while on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) do not appear to suffer harmful cognitive effects, according to research published online Nov. 24 in Neurology.

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Thrombolysis Tied to Better Stroke Outcome at All Ages

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous alteplase tend to fare better than those who do not undergo thrombolysis, and this holds true for those over the age of 80, according to research published online Nov. 23 in BMJ.

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Reallocation of Care Would Increase PCPs' Work Weeks

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Specialists spend a substantial amount of time providing routine chronic disease follow-up care, and reallocating half of this care to primary care physicians (PCPs) would add a few work weeks for each PCP, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Medical Care.

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Racial Disparity Seen With High-Risk Neuroblastoma

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- High-risk neuroblastoma appears to be more prevalent in blacks and Native Americans, and blacks with high-risk disease tend to have a higher rate of late-occurring events, according to research published online Nov. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Researchers ID Phenotype Tied to Maternal Alzheimer's History

MONDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Adults whose mothers had late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) -- but not those whose fathers did -- have a pathobiological phenotype marked by amyloid-beta (Aβ) oxidative stress, which may reflect their risk for developing the disease themselves, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of Biological Psychiatry.

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U.S. Health Insurance Compared to 10 Other Nations

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults in the United States spend more time and money on health insurance than those in many other developed nations, and ultimately deal with more coverage-related disputes and denials, according to research published online Nov. 18 in Health Affairs.

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Fraud in Scientific Literature Appears Intentional

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Scientific papers retracted after publication due to fraudulent data represent a calculated, deliberate effort to deceive, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Gray Matter Deficits Found in Sleep Apnea Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive impairment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) appears to be linked to a decrease of gray-matter volume in specific regions of the brain; however, these may be partially or fully reversed with early detection and treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Poor Handwriting in Autism Persists Into Adolescence

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Poor handwriting with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) persists from childhood into adolescence, but the main predictor for poor handwriting shifts from motor skills to perceptual reasoning ability in the older group, according to a study published the Nov. 16 issue of Neurology.

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Motorcycle Crashes a Major Cause of Brain Injury in Youths

MONDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Motorcycle crashes are a substantial cause of hospitalization and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adolescents, but helmet laws that target only younger riders are less effective than universal helmet laws in reducing TBI, according to a pair of studies published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Motorcycle Accidents & TBIs
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Abstract - Helmet Laws
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AHA Urges Certification Program for CVD, Stroke Care

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association (AHA) has proposed the development of a national hospital certification program to improve and standardize the delivery of care for cardiovascular disease and stroke. The AHA proposal has been laid out in a Presidential Advisory published online Nov. 12 in Circulation.

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Physician-Industry Financial Ties Decreased Since 2004

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer physicians received drug samples, food and beverages, reimbursement, or payment for professional services in 2009 than in 2004, but a large majority of physicians still report financial relationships with industry, according to research published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Disability Status Scale Predicts Progression in MS

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A worsening of the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) lasting at least six months is effective in identifying disease progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Prevalence Up

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of children aged 4 to 17 with a parent-reported attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis increased more than 20 percent between 2003 and 2007, with particularly notable increases among older teenagers and Hispanic children, according to a report published in the Nov. 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Most Family Doctors Provide Routine Vaccinations

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Most family physicians provide routine vaccinations as a part of their general services, but many refer patients to other locations for certain vaccines, often due to lack of adequate reimbursement, according to research published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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No Cholesterol-Alzheimer's Association Seen in Midlife

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Midlife cholesterol does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, though there may be a very small risk in individuals who live to an age at risk for dementia, according to research published online Nov. 10 in Neurology.

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New Cognitive Assessment Tool Appears Effective

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A new cognitive assessment tool, the Sweet 16, appears to be as effective as or superior to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), according to a study published online Nov. 8 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Low Vitamin D Levels Not Tied to Postpartum MS Relapses

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although pregnancy and exclusive breast-feeding are strongly related to low vitamin D levels in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, these low levels are not related to an increased risk of postpartum MS relapses, according to research published online Nov. 8 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Early Neurologic Improvement Tied to Good Outcome Later

TUESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) who demonstrate very early neurologic improvement (VENI) after intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) perfusion are likely to have favorable outcomes at three months, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Workers' Compensation Hand Injuries Receive Different Care

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Workers' Compensation insurance tend to have more clinic visits for hand injuries and disorders prior to surgery and more diagnostic testing than hand-injured patients with standard insurance, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Dabigatran Prevents Secondary Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The new anticoagulant dabigatran is as effective as warfarin for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and does not have a higher bleeding risk, according to research published online Nov. 8 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Rivastigmine Does Not Reduce Delirium in Critically Ill

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Rivastigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, does not appear to reduce the duration of delirium in critically ill patients, and it may even hasten death, according to research published online Nov. 5 in The Lancet.

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Vitamin E Tied to Increased Risk for Hemorrhagic Stroke

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin E supplementation appears to be associated with a 10 percent reduction in the risk for ischemic stroke but a 22 percent increase in the risk for hemorrhagic stroke, according to research published Nov. 4 in BMJ.

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Exposure to Epilepsy Drugs Tied to School Performance

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used by pregnant women to control seizures may adversely affect school performance in their children during their teen years, according to research published online Nov. 3 in Epilepsia.

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Brain MRI Can Detect Time of Stroke to Guide Treatment

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Indications of when a stroke occurred can be seen on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain, enabling clinicians to tell whether a stroke patient is within the window for potentially life-saving thrombolytic therapy, according to a study published online Nov. 2 in Radiology.

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Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Linked to Physical Decline

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Men with prostate cancer on androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) do not appear to suffer accelerated cognitive decline but may have diminished physical function and quality of life (QoL), according to a pair of studies published online Nov. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract - Cognitive Function Study
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Abstract - Physical Function Study
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Hospitalization Greatly Ups Risk of Severe Disability in Elderly

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In older people, illnesses and injuries steeply increase the chances of developing new or worsening disability, and the Advanced Dementia Prognostic Tool (ADEPT), as a continuous measure, has a modest ability to identify nursing home residents with advanced dementia who are at high risk of dying within six months, according to two studies published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Gill
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Abstract - Mitchell
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DHA Doesn't Show Benefit in Alzheimer's Disease

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation doesn't appear to slow the rate of cognitive and functional decline, according to research published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dabigatran Cost-Effective Alternative to Warfarin

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor that does not cause hepatotoxicity, may provide a cost-effective alternative to warfarin for preventing strokes in older adults with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, according to research published online Nov. 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Worse Outcome for Weekend Stroke Admission Confirmed

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Another study has confirmed that hospital admission for stroke on a weekend is associated with a higher mortality rate than admission on a weekday, but the reasons for this remain unclear, according to research published in the Nov. 2 issue of Neurology.

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AAN Releases Statement on Sports-Related Concussion

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has issued a position statement on sports-related concussion.

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Afinitor Approved for Rare Genetic Disorder

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Afinitor (everolimus) has received expanded approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat a rare genetic disorder called subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) that cannot be treated with surgery.

FDA

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