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Category: Gynecology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2010 Briefing - OBGYN & Women’s Health

Last Updated: December 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for November 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Pregnancy-Related Mortality Increased in Recent Decades

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, pregnancy-related mortality has increased substantially, with African-American women dying at more than three times the rate of white women, according to a study in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Diabetes Linked to Poor Breast Cancer Outcomes

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Women with diabetes mellitus and breast cancer appear to be at a higher risk of mortality and other negative breast cancer-related events, according to two studies published online Nov. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Several other studies published online also highlight the links between obesity, diabetes, and poor breast cancer prognosis.

Abstract - Peairs
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Abstract - Erickson
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IOM Sets New Vitamin D, Calcium Intake Levels

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has set new dietary intake levels for vitamin D and calcium, and the agency notes that most North Americans already get enough calcium and vitamin D to be healthy.

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Chlamydia Screening Remains Important for Doctors to Note

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In young women now getting cervical cancer screening every two years instead of annually, health care providers should be aware of other opportunities for chlamydial screening, according to research published in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Weight Misperception Common Among Young Women

FRIDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Weight misperceptions are common among reproductive-age women, according to a study in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Antiepileptic Drugs May Not Harm Breast-Fed Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children of mothers who breast-feed while on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) do not appear to suffer harmful cognitive effects, according to research published online Nov. 24 in Neurology.

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PPI Use in Early Pregnancy Not Linked to Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) by pregnant women in the first trimester to treat the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux does not significantly increase the risk of major birth defects, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Peanuts During Pregnancy Linked to Infant Sensitization

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of peanuts during pregnancy is associated with later sensitization to peanuts and possible peanut allergy among infants with apparent egg or milk allergy, according to research published online Oct. 29 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Home STI Testing Improves Screening Rates

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women on long-acting contraceptives are more likely to complete sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening when they can self-test at home instead of going to a clinic, according to research published in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Reallocation of Care Would Increase PCPs' Work Weeks

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Specialists spend a substantial amount of time providing routine chronic disease follow-up care, and reallocating half of this care to primary care physicians (PCPs) would add a few work weeks for each PCP, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Medical Care.

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ACOG Issues Guidelines for Care of Women With HIV

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In the face of rising numbers of HIV-positive women in the United States, many of them of reproductive age, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has issued a set of new guidelines to assist Ob-Gyns in delivering optimal care to this population. The guidelines have been published in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Management of Abnormal Pap-HPV Tests Not Guideline Based

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- When faced with managing even the most common abnormal Pap smear and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing results, most physicians, including obstetrician-gynecologists, do not adhere to current management guidelines, according to research published in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Depressive Disorders Prevalent in Pregnant Women

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 10 percent of pregnant women may suffer from depressive disorders, and these disorders are significantly associated with identifiable, clinically relevant risk factors, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Pregnancy From Donor Egg Raises Hypertension Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancies resulting from in vitro fertilization (IVF) using donated eggs are more likely to result in gestational hypertension and preeclampsia than IVF pregnancies in which autologous eggs are implanted, and pregnancies from cryopreserved embryos are also tied to a higher risk for hypertensive disorders, according to a study in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Gestational Weight Gain Guidelines Questioned

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy may be appropriate for underweight or normal-weight women, but overweight and obese women may have better outcomes if they adhere to different gestational weight gain recommendations, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Research Supports Annual Mammogram for Some

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For women younger than 50 who are at medium familial risk of breast cancer, yearly mammographic surveillance could increase cancer detection, allow disease to be detected at an earlier stage, and decrease predicted mortality, according to research published online Nov. 18 in The Lancet Oncology.

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U.S. Health Insurance Compared to 10 Other Nations

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults in the United States spend more time and money on health insurance than those in many other developed nations, and ultimately deal with more coverage-related disputes and denials, according to research published online Nov. 18 in Health Affairs.

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Risk of Mammography Radiation Found to Be Low

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among women aged 40 and older undergoing routine mammographic screening, the risk of resulting radiation-induced breast cancer is low, suggesting that women shouldn't be deterred from mammography for this concern, according to research published online Nov. 16 in Radiology.

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Breast Cancer Screening Results Worse With BRCA1 Mutation

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among hereditary breast cancers, those with BRCA1 mutations are less likely to be detected mammographically and more likely to be larger than 1 cm when detected, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Lymphedema Prominent in Early Breast Cancer Survivors

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is fairly high in early breast cancer survivors, and being African-American or more educated is related to a higher risk, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Fraud in Scientific Literature Appears Intentional

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Scientific papers retracted after publication due to fraudulent data represent a calculated, deliberate effort to deceive, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Smoking in Pregnancy, Criminal Behavior Link Confirmed

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The relationship between heavy maternal smoking in pregnancy (MSP) and criminal offenses committed by adult offspring remains significant even after adjustment for multiple potential confounders, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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United States Still Has Too-High Rate of Preterm Birth

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Since the previous year's report card, the preterm birth rate in the United States has improved, but the nation still earns a D on the new March of Dimes 2010 Premature Birth Report Card when compared to Healthy People 2010 goals, according to the organization, which released the report on Nov. 17.

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OTC Analgesics Up Risk of Congenital Cryptorchidism

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of over-the-counter pain medication during pregnancy -- particularly in the second trimester -- may increase the risk of congenital cryptorchidism, a finding which may explain recent marked increases in the incidence of this condition, according to research published online Nov. 8 in Human Reproduction.

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Foreign Bodies Increase Cost, Length of Stay, Not Mortality

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The procedures during which foreign bodies are most likely to be left behind in pediatric patients tend to be gynecologic, and although these mishaps increase hospital stay and cost, they do not appear to increase mortality, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Halaven Approved for Late-Stage Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Halaven (eribulin mesylate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat metastatic (spreading) breast cancer among people who have had at least two prior chemotherapy treatments for late-stage disease.

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Novel Combo Imaging Spots Malignant Breast Lesions

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed imaging system that combines optical and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging can noninvasively distinguish malignant and benign breast lesions, cysts, and adipose tissue, potentially reducing the false positives and unnecessary biopsies that can occur with conventional mammography, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in Radiology.

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Childhood, Teenage Abuse Linked to Diabetes in Adulthood

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate to severe physical and sexual abuse in childhood and adolescence appears to increase the risk for type 2 diabetes in adult women, partly because of the higher body mass index in women who were abused as children, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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AAGL: Laparoscopic or Vaginal Hysterectomy Preferred

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Most hysterectomies for benign disease should be performed either vaginally or laparoscopically, according to a position statement by the AAGL (formerly known as the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists and now referred to only by its acronym) published online Nov. 9 in the Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology.

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Physician-Industry Financial Ties Decreased Since 2004

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer physicians received drug samples, food and beverages, reimbursement, or payment for professional services in 2009 than in 2004, but a large majority of physicians still report financial relationships with industry, according to research published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Invasive Breast Cancers Show Decline in Older Women

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Alongside a steep decline in the use of hormone therapy, incidence of invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ fell in older women undergoing regular mammography in 2002 to 2006, according to research published online Nov. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Low Vitamin D Levels Not Tied to Postpartum MS Relapses

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although pregnancy and exclusive breast-feeding are strongly related to low vitamin D levels in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, these low levels are not related to an increased risk of postpartum MS relapses, according to research published online Nov. 8 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Venlafaxine Preferred Over Gabapentin for Hot Flashes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer survivors may prefer venlafaxine for treating hot flashes over gabapentin, according to research published online Nov. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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HPV Vaccine Program Reduces Genital Warts Diagnoses

TUESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program for females aged 12 to 26 years in Australia substantially reduced the diagnosis of genital warts among females, and subsequently decreased the diagnosis of genital warts among unvaccinated heterosexual men, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Silicone Beats Saline for Satisfaction With Implants

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who undergo post-mastectomy reconstruction report higher satisfaction with silicone implants than with saline implants, according to research published online Nov. 8 in Cancer.

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Fitness Tied to Lower Mortality Despite Adiposity Category

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Women with high cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) have lower all-cause mortality than less fit women in all categories of adiposity, according to a study in the November issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Teen Oral Sex Found to Predict Vaginal Sex Onset

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- When teens become sexually active, oral sex usually occurs first, which increases the likelihood that vaginal sex will also soon occur, according to research published online Nov. 1 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Exposure to Epilepsy Drugs Tied to School Performance

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used by pregnant women to control seizures may adversely affect school performance in their children during their teen years, according to research published online Nov. 3 in Epilepsia.

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Placental Growth Factor May Be Marker for Pregnancy Location

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Placental growth factor (PIGF) may serve as an effective diagnostic biomarker for early pregnancy location and pregnancy outcome, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Allergies Tied to Higher Coronary Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Common allergies may be linked to an increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), especially in women under the age of 50, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Very Elderly Women at Risk for Unneeded Catheter Placement

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Women 80 years of age and older appear to be at high risk for inappropriate urinary catheter (UC) utilization in the emergency department, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Childhood Sexual Abuse May Raise Risk for Psychosis

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood sexual abuse involving penetration appears to increase the risk of developing psychotic disorders later in life, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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