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Category: Oncology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2010 Briefing - Hematology & Oncology

Last Updated: December 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Hematology & Oncology for November 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Surveillance Reasonable for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- For men with low-risk, localized prostate cancer, active surveillance appears to be an attractive alternative to initial treatment in terms of quality of life, according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Patient Attitudes Toward CT Risk Assessed

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department patients requiring computed tomography (CT) appear more concerned about having their condition diagnosed with CT imaging than they are about their risk of cancer associated with the procedure, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Abstract
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Celecoxib May Prevent Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor celecoxib appears to be an effective chemopreventive agent for nonmelanoma skin cancers in patients who have extensive actinic damage and are at high risk for the cancers, according to research published online Nov. 29 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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Editorial

Diabetes Linked to Poor Breast Cancer Outcomes

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Women with diabetes mellitus and breast cancer appear to be at a higher risk of mortality and other negative breast cancer-related events, according to two studies published online Nov. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Several other studies published online also highlight the links between obesity, diabetes, and poor breast cancer prognosis.

Abstract - Peairs
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Abstract - Erickson
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Surgeons' Experience Tied to Prostatectomy Outcome

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of surgeons with high annual radical prostatectomy (RP) caseloads has increased over the last decade, and patients undergoing RPs are at lower risk of complications or transfusions if their surgeons are in the high caseload tertile, according to research published in the December issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
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1 Percent of Deaths Worldwide Due to Secondhand Smoke

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 1 percent of the deaths that occur in the world annually are due to passive smoking, and many of these deaths are in children, according to research published online Nov. 26 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Informed Consent Discussions Often Miss Key Topics

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- When oncologists and cancer patients discuss informed consent for clinical trial participation, oncologists may leave out key topics, while patients may interpret information incorrectly, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Outcomes Better in Recent Hematopoietic Cell Recipients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplants during a period in the mid-2000s had a variety of improved outcomes compared to patients during a period 10 years earlier, according to research published in the Nov. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Reallocation of Care Would Increase PCPs' Work Weeks

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Specialists spend a substantial amount of time providing routine chronic disease follow-up care, and reallocating half of this care to primary care physicians (PCPs) would add a few work weeks for each PCP, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Medical Care.

Abstract
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Alpha-Carotene Associated With Lower Risk of Death

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Having higher serum concentrations of α-carotene is associated with a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all causes, according to research published online Nov. 22 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Prostate Cancer Severity No Influence on Recurrence

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Practitioners frequently err in determining the severity of prostate cancer, but clinical stage does not appear to influence risk of recurrence after surgical treatment, according to research published online Nov. 22 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Racial Disparity Seen With High-Risk Neuroblastoma

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- High-risk neuroblastoma appears to be more prevalent in blacks and Native Americans, and blacks with high-risk disease tend to have a higher rate of late-occurring events, according to research published online Nov. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Arsenic in First Remission May Improve Leukemia Survival

MONDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- When administered in early remission, arsenic appears to improve the survival rates of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), according to a study published in the Nov. 11 issue of Blood.

Abstract
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Possible Red Flag to Predict Colorectal Cancer Identified

MONDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Large serrated polyps (LSPs) discovered during a colonoscopy are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) -- proximal CRC in particular, according to research published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Widespread Lynch Syndrome Screening May Be Cost-Effective

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Screening unaffected individuals through demographic and family histories to determine who should be offered genetic testing for Lynch syndrome mutations may be a cost-effective approach to identifying people at higher risk for endometrial and colorectal cancer, according to research published online Nov. 18 in Cancer Prevention Research.

Abstract
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Xgeva Approved to Prevent Fractures in Bone Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Xgeva (denosumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent fractures and other skeletal complications in people with advanced cancer that has metastasized to the bones.

this approval

Research Supports Annual Mammogram for Some

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For women younger than 50 who are at medium familial risk of breast cancer, yearly mammographic surveillance could increase cancer detection, allow disease to be detected at an earlier stage, and decrease predicted mortality, according to research published online Nov. 18 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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U.S. Health Insurance Compared to 10 Other Nations

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults in the United States spend more time and money on health insurance than those in many other developed nations, and ultimately deal with more coverage-related disputes and denials, according to research published online Nov. 18 in Health Affairs.

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Risk of Mammography Radiation Found to Be Low

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among women aged 40 and older undergoing routine mammographic screening, the risk of resulting radiation-induced breast cancer is low, suggesting that women shouldn't be deterred from mammography for this concern, according to research published online Nov. 16 in Radiology.

Abstract
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Young Adult Cancer Patients Do Not Cope As Well

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients age 40 and younger have more cancer-related pain and financial difficulties, and do not cope with cancer as well as older patients, despite having a generally better prognosis, according to research published in the October issue of Pain Medicine.

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Breast Cancer Screening Results Worse With BRCA1 Mutation

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among hereditary breast cancers, those with BRCA1 mutations are less likely to be detected mammographically and more likely to be larger than 1 cm when detected, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Low Vitamin D Levels May Be Detrimental in Leukemia

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Insufficient vitamin D levels in people with chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) appear to be associated with faster disease progression and a higher mortality rate, according to research published online Nov. 3 in Blood.

Abstract
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Study Probes Mutations That Underlie Uveal Melanoma

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most uveal melanomas and blue nevi may have mutations in GNAQ -- which encodes an alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins -- or GNA11, a paralogue of GNAQ, according to research published online Nov. 17 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Preventive Care, Surveillance High Among CRC Survivors

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors who participate in clinical trials have better routine preventive health care and cancer screening than the general population, and also have high rates of compliance with cancer surveillance, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Intra-Abdominal Fat Predicts Hepatectomy Complications

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Use of imaging to identify patients with intra-abdominal fat, as opposed to outer-abdominal fat or mere high body mass index (BMI), may help assess risk for increased complications, including death, following major hepatectomy, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Lymphedema Prominent in Early Breast Cancer Survivors

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is fairly high in early breast cancer survivors, and being African-American or more educated is related to a higher risk, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Fraud in Scientific Literature Appears Intentional

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Scientific papers retracted after publication due to fraudulent data represent a calculated, deliberate effort to deceive, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Abstract
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Laparoscopic Liver Resection May Beat Open Surgery

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopic liver resection for malignant tumors appears to result in fewer complications than open surgery and is associated with at least comparable long-term survival, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Experts Show Lack of Consistency in High-Risk SCC

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mohs surgeons show a lack of consistency regarding indications for radiologic nodal staging (RNS) and adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) in high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (HRCSCC), suggesting a need for clinical trials, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Radiation of Head, Neck Tied to Severe Hearing Loss

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Radiotherapy for head and neck cancer that includes the auditory system in the radiation field may result in severe hearing loss in nearly one in five patients, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Combo Beats Monotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Combined sorafenib and doxorubicin appears to slow disease progression and increase overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) more effectively than doxorubicin alone, according to research published in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Halaven Approved for Late-Stage Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Halaven (eribulin mesylate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat metastatic (spreading) breast cancer among people who have had at least two prior chemotherapy treatments for late-stage disease.

this approval

Pain Linked With Poorer Prognosis in Liver Cancer

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Pain at presentation may indicate a worse prognosis for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
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Men's Knowledge of Testicular Cancer May Be Rising

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to a few decades ago, men may be more aware of issues surrounding testis cancer, including symptoms and cure rates, and may be more likely to perform self-examination, according to research published in the October issue of Urology.

Abstract
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Novel Combo Imaging Spots Malignant Breast Lesions

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed imaging system that combines optical and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging can noninvasively distinguish malignant and benign breast lesions, cysts, and adipose tissue, potentially reducing the false positives and unnecessary biopsies that can occur with conventional mammography, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in Radiology.

Abstract
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Physician-Industry Financial Ties Decreased Since 2004

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer physicians received drug samples, food and beverages, reimbursement, or payment for professional services in 2009 than in 2004, but a large majority of physicians still report financial relationships with industry, according to research published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Chemo Combo for Biliary Tract Cancer Successful

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Cetuximab in combination with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin shows promise as a first-line palliative care treatment for biliary tract cancers and appears to increase the chance for potentially curative secondary resection, according to the results of a prospective, phase II trial published online Nov. 10 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Androgen Deprivation May Up Risk of Colorectal Cancer

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Men taking androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer may have a higher risk of colorectal cancer, and that risk appears to increase with longer duration of ADT, according to research published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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Editorial

Invasive Breast Cancers Show Decline in Older Women

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Alongside a steep decline in the use of hormone therapy, incidence of invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ fell in older women undergoing regular mammography in 2002 to 2006, according to research published online Nov. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Romiplostim Beats Usual Care for Immune Thrombocytopenia

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Romiplostim, a thrombopoietin mimetic, is associated with higher rates of platelet response, lower rates of treatment failure and splenectomy, fewer blood transfusions, less bleeding, and a higher quality of life than standard care among patients with immune thrombocytopenia, according to a study published in the Nov. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Genetic Mutations for Poor Outcomes in AML Identified

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified genetic mutations that appear to be associated with adverse outcomes in people with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Their research has been published online Nov. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Venlafaxine Preferred Over Gabapentin for Hot Flashes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer survivors may prefer venlafaxine for treating hot flashes over gabapentin, according to research published online Nov. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Report Highlights Important Advances in Cancer Research

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Important recent advances in cancer research include studies assessing improved drug therapies, methods for reducing the risk of disease recurrence, and treatments for improving progression-free survival, according to a new report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology published online Nov. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Silicone Beats Saline for Satisfaction With Implants

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who undergo post-mastectomy reconstruction report higher satisfaction with silicone implants than with saline implants, according to research published online Nov. 8 in Cancer.

Abstract
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CT Screening May Reduce Lung Cancer Death Rate

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Annual lung cancer screening using computed tomography (CT) rather than conventional X-ray imaging could cut lung cancer mortality in older current or former heavy smokers by 20 percent, according to the results of the National Lung Screening Trial published online Nov. 2 in Radiology.

Abstract
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U.S. Smoking Prevalence Varies Widely by State and Territory

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported cigarette smoking prevalence in U.S. states and territories ranges from 6.4 percent in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 25.6 percent in Kentucky and West Virginia, while the prevalence of smokeless tobacco use ranges from 0.8 percent in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 9.1 percent in Wyoming, according to a report published Nov. 5 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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HPV Vaccine Cost-Effective for Anal Cancer Prevention

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Targeted human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of young men who have sex with men (MSM) is cost-effective for prevention of some anal cancers, according to research published online Nov. 3 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Men With Diabetes Have Higher Colorectal Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Men -- but not women -- with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have a modestly increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), though insulin use is not related to a substantially increased CRC risk, according to a study in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Radiotherapy Method Improves Survival in Elderly With Cancer

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in elderly patients is associated with a significant improvement in survival and a drop in the proportion of untreated patients, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Studies Assess Genes in Ribavirin-Induced Anemia

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Two variants in the ITPA gene that cause inosine triphosphatase (ITPase) deficiency are linked to protection from ribavirin-induced hemolytic anemia in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and a missense substitution on the ITPA gene influences ribavirin-induced anemia in Japanese patients with the virus, according to two studies published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract - Thompson
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Abstract - Ochi
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Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Linked to Physical Decline

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Men with prostate cancer on androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) do not appear to suffer accelerated cognitive decline but may have diminished physical function and quality of life (QoL), according to a pair of studies published online Nov. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract - Cognitive Function Study
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Abstract - Physical Function Study
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PSA Screening Cuts Prostate Cancer Deaths in Healthy Men

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in men in good health appears to reduce the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) with minimal overtreatment, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Recombinant Activated Factor VII May Increase Clot Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) to treat bleeding may increase the risk of arterial -- though not venous -- thromboembolic events, particularly in the elderly, according to research published in the Nov. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medicare Act Tied to Reductions in Inappropriate ADT Use

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of the Medicare Modernization Act, which led to reduced reimbursement for androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer, appears to have substantially reduced the rate at which the therapy is used for inappropriate indications, according to research published in the Nov. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Colorectal Screening Strategies for African-Americans Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Though African-Americans are less likely than other ethnic groups to be screened for colorectal cancer (CRC), interventions employing individually-tailored communications delivered in multiple ways and at multiple times may effectively improve screening rates, according to a review in the November/December issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Abstract

Afinitor Approved for Rare Genetic Disorder

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Afinitor (everolimus) has received expanded approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat a rare genetic disorder called subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) that cannot be treated with surgery.

FDA

Off-Protocol Therapy May Impact Clinical Trial Accrual

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Most recent oncology randomized controlled trials evaluate drugs that are available "off-protocol therapy" in the United States, and this can adversely impact trial enrollment, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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