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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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November 2010 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: December 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for November 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Impaired Mitochondrial Function Found in Autism

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may be more likely to have impaired mitochondrial function and abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) than children without autism, according to preliminary research published in the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Wide Variation Found in OTC Pediatric Drug Directions

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released guidelines recommending more consistency and clarity in over-the-counter (OTC) drug dosing directives in November 2009, top-selling pediatric OTC liquid drugs included extremely inconsistent and variable directions and measuring devices, according to a study published online Nov. 30 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Inactivated Flu Vaccine Effective in Protecting Young Children

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine appears effective in young children, even those under the age of 2, according to research published online Nov. 23 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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IOM Sets New Vitamin D, Calcium Intake Levels

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has set new dietary intake levels for vitamin D and calcium, and the agency notes that most North Americans already get enough calcium and vitamin D to be healthy.

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Risk Factors at Age 9 Predict Adult Cardiovascular Disease

TUESDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular risk factor assessment in childhood is not predictive of adult cardiovascular disease unless measured at or after 9 years of age, according to research published online Nov. 29 in Circulation.

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Overweight Children at Risk for Heart Disease Factors by Teens

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Children with a high body mass index (BMI) may develop heart disease-associated risk factors by their teens, though they -- girls in particular -- may be able to improve their heart disease profiles if they are able to reduce the excess weight by the time they reach adolescence, according to research published online Nov. 25 in BMJ.

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Vegetable, Fruit Intake Impacts Atherosclerosis Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle risk factors over a lifetime, especially fruit and vegetable consumption, are associated with the degree of adult arterial stiffness, according to research published online Nov. 29 in Circulation.

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Controlled Medications for Teens Nearly Doubled Since '94

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The number of prescriptions written for controlled medications to adolescents and young adults has approximately doubled since 1994, according to research published online Nov. 29 in Pediatrics.

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1 Percent of Deaths Worldwide Due to Secondhand Smoke

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 1 percent of the deaths that occur in the world annually are due to passive smoking, and many of these deaths are in children, according to research published online Nov. 26 in The Lancet.

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Dermatitis May Not Influence Bone Density in Children

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- There appears to be no correlation between low bone mineral density (BMD) and atopic dermatitis in children, and use of topical corticosteroids in children with atopic dermatitis is not associated with a decrease in BMD, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Chlamydia Screening Remains Important for Doctors to Note

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In young women now getting cervical cancer screening every two years instead of annually, health care providers should be aware of other opportunities for chlamydial screening, according to research published in the December issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Antiepileptic Drugs May Not Harm Breast-Fed Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children of mothers who breast-feed while on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) do not appear to suffer harmful cognitive effects, according to research published online Nov. 24 in Neurology.

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PPI Use in Early Pregnancy Not Linked to Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) by pregnant women in the first trimester to treat the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux does not significantly increase the risk of major birth defects, according to a study in the Nov. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Peanuts During Pregnancy Linked to Infant Sensitization

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of peanuts during pregnancy is associated with later sensitization to peanuts and possible peanut allergy among infants with apparent egg or milk allergy, according to research published online Oct. 29 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Reallocation of Care Would Increase PCPs' Work Weeks

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Specialists spend a substantial amount of time providing routine chronic disease follow-up care, and reallocating half of this care to primary care physicians (PCPs) would add a few work weeks for each PCP, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Medical Care.

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Congenital Heart Disease Death Rate Down

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The mortality rate for children and adults has declined in individuals with congenital heart disease (CHD), but there is still significant mortality in adults, and ethnic/racial disparities persist, according to research published online Nov. 22 in Circulation.

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Racial Disparity Seen With High-Risk Neuroblastoma

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- High-risk neuroblastoma appears to be more prevalent in blacks and Native Americans, and blacks with high-risk disease tend to have a higher rate of late-occurring events, according to research published online Nov. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Privacy in Health Care Important to Adolescents

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents are most concerned about the privacy of their health information, but also are sensitive to the psychological, social, and physical aspects of privacy encountered in health care situations, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Late-Preterm Birth Tied to Lower IQ After Adjustment

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Independent of maternal intelligence quotient (IQ), residential setting, and sociodemographics, children born late-preterm are at higher risk for having a lower IQ and more behavioral problems at age 6 than children from a full-term pregnancy, according to research published online Nov. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Adverse Events Down in Infants Following OTC Med Withdrawal

MONDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of adverse events seen in emergency departments that were linked to infant cough and cold medications (CCMs) dropped by more than half soon after the over-the-counter products were withdrawn from the market in 2007, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in Pediatrics.

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White Areas in Hemangiomas Point to Ulceration

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with infantile hemangiomas (IHs), early white discoloration predicts ulceration with high sensitivity, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Secondhand Smoke Tied to Hearing Loss Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to the known increased risk of hearing loss associated with smoking, it appears that exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) may pose a similar risk, according to research published online Nov. 15 in Tobacco Control.

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Antibiotic Use in Children's Hospitals Varies Greatly

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Many children admitted to a children's hospital receive antibiotics while there, but the use of antibiotics varies widely by hospital, according to a study published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics.

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U.S. Health Insurance Compared to 10 Other Nations

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults in the United States spend more time and money on health insurance than those in many other developed nations, and ultimately deal with more coverage-related disputes and denials, according to research published online Nov. 18 in Health Affairs.

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3-Year-Olds' Weight Is Determinant of Systolic BP

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In 3-year-old children, current weight is a determinant of systolic blood pressure while postnatal growth to 6 months of age is more predictive than birth weight, according to a study published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Fraud in Scientific Literature Appears Intentional

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Scientific papers retracted after publication due to fraudulent data represent a calculated, deliberate effort to deceive, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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United States Still Has Too-High Rate of Preterm Birth

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Since the previous year's report card, the preterm birth rate in the United States has improved, but the nation still earns a D on the new March of Dimes 2010 Premature Birth Report Card when compared to Healthy People 2010 goals, according to the organization, which released the report on Nov. 17.

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Review Notes Shift in Otitis Media Microbiology After PCV7

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Though the microbiology of acute otitis media (AOM) has shifted, there is still no gold standard for diagnosis or treatment of the condition, according to research published in the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Education Linked to Pain-Reducing Steps at Pediatrician

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- An hour-long teaching session in pediatric offices on reducing immunization pain is associated with increased use of pain-reducing strategies, according to research published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Lactobacillus GG Linked to Benefits in Childhood IBS

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) may reduce abdominal pain in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), possibly due to improvement of the gut barrier, according to research published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Poor Handwriting in Autism Persists Into Adolescence

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Poor handwriting with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) persists from childhood into adolescence, but the main predictor for poor handwriting shifts from motor skills to perceptual reasoning ability in the older group, according to a study published the Nov. 16 issue of Neurology.

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Foreign Bodies Increase Cost, Length of Stay, Not Mortality

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The procedures during which foreign bodies are most likely to be left behind in pediatric patients tend to be gynecologic, and although these mishaps increase hospital stay and cost, they do not appear to increase mortality, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Vyvanse Approved for Adolescent ADHD

MONDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) capsules have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among adolescents aged 13 to 17, maker Shire Pharmaceuticals said Monday.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Problematic Teen Gamers Few; Adverse Effects Serious

MONDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- While playing video games in moderation does not adversely affect health for most adolescents, problematic gamers are more likely to smoke, use drugs, fight, and feel depressed, according to a study published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Motorcycle Crashes a Major Cause of Brain Injury in Youths

MONDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Motorcycle crashes are a substantial cause of hospitalization and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adolescents, but helmet laws that target only younger riders are less effective than universal helmet laws in reducing TBI, according to a pair of studies published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Motorcycle Accidents & TBIs
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Child Mortality in India Found to Be Largely Preventable

MONDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In India, nearly 1.5 million children who died in 2005 succumbed to five avoidable causes, according to research published online Nov. 15 in The Lancet.

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Patients Treated for Severe Acne Have Higher Suicide Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals treated with isotretinoin for severe acne are at an increased risk of attempted suicide up to six months after the end of treatment, though there is already an increased risk in acne patients before treatment, so an additional risk due to treatment cannot be established, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in BMJ.

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Childhood, Teenage Abuse Linked to Diabetes in Adulthood

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate to severe physical and sexual abuse in childhood and adolescence appears to increase the risk for type 2 diabetes in adult women, partly because of the higher body mass index in women who were abused as children, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Physician-Industry Financial Ties Decreased Since 2004

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer physicians received drug samples, food and beverages, reimbursement, or payment for professional services in 2009 than in 2004, but a large majority of physicians still report financial relationships with industry, according to research published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Combo Therapy With Ribavirin Superior in Children With Hep C

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In children and adolescents with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), the combination of peginterferon alfa-2a (PEG2a) and ribavirin is effective for achieving sustained virologic response (SVR), according to a study published online Nov. 1 in Gastroenterology.

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Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Prevalence Up

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of children aged 4 to 17 with a parent-reported attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis increased more than 20 percent between 2003 and 2007, with particularly notable increases among older teenagers and Hispanic children, according to a report published in the Nov. 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Most Family Doctors Provide Routine Vaccinations

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Most family physicians provide routine vaccinations as a part of their general services, but many refer patients to other locations for certain vaccines, often due to lack of adequate reimbursement, according to research published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Infant Diet May Affect Beta-Cell Autoimmunity Markers

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In infants at increased risk for type 1 diabetes due to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype, supplementing breast milk with a highly hydrolyzed milk formula is associated with fewer signs of beta-cell autoimmunity into childhood, according to research published in the Nov. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Adolescent Preventive Care Opportunities Missed

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents tend to utilize doctor visits more for non-preventive care than for preventive care, but most see a doctor at least once a year, findings that suggest all visits could be opportunities for providing preventive care services, according to research published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Obese Teens at Risk of Being Severely Obese As Adults

TUESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Obese adolescents face a higher risk of developing severe obesity in young adulthood, according to research published in the Nov. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Artesunate Better Than Quinine for Malaria Treatment in Africa

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Artesunate is clearly superior to quinine for treatment of severe falciparum malaria in African children, according to research published online Nov. 8 in The Lancet to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, held from Nov. 3 to 7 in Atlanta.

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Using Formula May Not Help New Moms Sleep Better

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers who use formula to feed their infants, as opposed to breast-feeding, may not get better sleep, according to research published online Nov. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Parent's Deployment Linked to Child's Mental Health Visits

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children of military personnel appear to have an increase in outpatient visits for mental and behavioral health issues while a parent is deployed, according to research published online Nov. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Teen Oral Sex Found to Predict Vaginal Sex Onset

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- When teens become sexually active, oral sex usually occurs first, which increases the likelihood that vaginal sex will also soon occur, according to research published online Nov. 1 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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HPV Vaccine Cost-Effective for Anal Cancer Prevention

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Targeted human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of young men who have sex with men (MSM) is cost-effective for prevention of some anal cancers, according to research published online Nov. 3 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Exposure to Epilepsy Drugs Tied to School Performance

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used by pregnant women to control seizures may adversely affect school performance in their children during their teen years, according to research published online Nov. 3 in Epilepsia.

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IOM Recommends More Nutritious Meals at Day Cares

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Federally funded snacks and meals served at child and adult day care facilities should be composed of more fruits and vegetables and less fat, salt, and sugar, according to a new report from the Institute of Medicine, "Child and Adult Care Food Program: Aligning Dietary Guidance for All."

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Missing Well-Child Visits Risky for Chronically Ill Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Young children with chronic conditions who get regular well-child care (WCC) are less likely to be hospitalized than those who do not get regular care, especially if the children also have high continuity of care (COC), according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Obese Children Getting New Liver Face Long-Term Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Obese pediatric patients undergoing liver transplantation have a higher risk of late mortality than normal and overweight patients, while thin and extremely thin patients have higher risk of early mortality, according to research published in the November issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Rural Teens More Likely to Abuse Prescription Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents living in rural areas are significantly more likely to abuse prescription drugs than their counterparts in urban areas, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Toothache Found in 11 Percent of U.S. Children

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Toothache occurs in about 11 percent of U.S. children, at disproportionately higher rates in minorities, low-income children, and those with special needs; most children, however, see doctors who could address oral health issues, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Preventing Obesity in Young Black Girls Proves Challenging

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A variety of interventions, including hip-hop dancing, group counseling, home/family interventions, and health education, failed to prevent obesity or body mass index (BMI) gain in young African-American girls in a pair of research studies published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract - Robinson
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Change to Healthier Beverages in Schools Is Slow

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Despite Institute of Medicine guidelines recommending only the sale of water, 100 percent juice, and 1 percent or nonfat milk from vending machines in elementary schools, the percentage of students attending public schools that adhere to these guidelines has increased only to 16 percent, according to research published online Nov. 1 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Many Children Hospitalized With H1N1 Were in ICU or Died

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Among children hospitalized with 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) in California, more than one-fourth were placed in intensive care units (ICUs) or died, according to a study published in the November Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. According to another study in the same issue that assessed children in Israel, those who had underlying illnesses and premature infants were at higher risk of severe complications from H1N1.

Abstract - Louie
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Teens Recover From Depression With Short-Term Treatment

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who respond fully to short-term treatment for major depression are more likely than partial or non-responders to recover within two years, and full or partial responders are less likely to suffer a recurrence, though recurrence occurs in nearly half of recovered adolescents -- particularly females, according to research published online Nov. 1 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Childhood Sexual Abuse May Raise Risk for Psychosis

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood sexual abuse involving penetration appears to increase the risk of developing psychotic disorders later in life, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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AAN Releases Statement on Sports-Related Concussion

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has issued a position statement on sports-related concussion.

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Preschoolers Racking Up High Amounts of Daily Screen Time

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Preschoolers may be spending more time watching television and videos at home and in child care than experts recommend, according to research published online Oct. 28 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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PHQ-9 Effectively Screens Adolescents for Depression

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Item (PHQ-9) appears to be an effective method for screening adolescents for depression, according to research published online Nov. 1 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Ankle Sprain Incidence Varies Demographically

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- About half of all ankle sprains occur during participation in athletics, and teens have more than a three-fold higher incidence of these injuries than the general population, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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