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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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November 2010 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: December 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for November 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Surgery to Remove Ingested Foreign Bodies Safe But Costly

FRIDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The ingestion of foreign bodies (FBs) is a serious and recurring problem that rarely has endoscopic complications but can be expensive to treat, according to research published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Diabetes-Depression Link Appears Bidirectional

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The relationship between depression and diabetes appears to be bidirectional: those with diabetes may be at higher risk for depression, and vice versa, according to research published in the Nov. 22 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Retirement May Ease Fatigue, Depression

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Retirement from work appears to have no influence on the prevalence of chronic disease, but it does appear to lessen physical and mental fatigue and depressive symptoms, particularly in those with chronic diseases prior to retirement, according to research published online Nov. 23 in BMJ.

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Depressive Disorders Prevalent in Pregnant Women

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 10 percent of pregnant women may suffer from depressive disorders, and these disorders are significantly associated with identifiable, clinically relevant risk factors, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Privacy in Health Care Important to Adolescents

TUESDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents are most concerned about the privacy of their health information, but also are sensitive to the psychological, social, and physical aspects of privacy encountered in health care situations, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Researchers ID Phenotype Tied to Maternal Alzheimer's History

MONDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Adults whose mothers had late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) -- but not those whose fathers did -- have a pathobiological phenotype marked by amyloid-beta (Aβ) oxidative stress, which may reflect their risk for developing the disease themselves, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of Biological Psychiatry.

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U.S. Health Insurance Compared to 10 Other Nations

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults in the United States spend more time and money on health insurance than those in many other developed nations, and ultimately deal with more coverage-related disputes and denials, according to research published online Nov. 18 in Health Affairs.

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Survey Finds High Mental Illness Burden in U.S.

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- About one-fifth of American adults have experienced mental illness during the past year, according to the results of a survey released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) on Nov. 18.

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Young Adult Cancer Patients Do Not Cope As Well

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients age 40 and younger have more cancer-related pain and financial difficulties, and do not cope with cancer as well as older patients, despite having a generally better prognosis, according to research published in the October issue of Pain Medicine.

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Fraud in Scientific Literature Appears Intentional

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Scientific papers retracted after publication due to fraudulent data represent a calculated, deliberate effort to deceive, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Social Status May Affect Depression Treatment Outcome

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Working-class and poor individuals may see less improvement in their ability to function at work after treatment for depression compared to middle-class patients, according to research published in the July issue of Psychiatric Services.

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Smoking in Pregnancy, Criminal Behavior Link Confirmed

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The relationship between heavy maternal smoking in pregnancy (MSP) and criminal offenses committed by adult offspring remains significant even after adjustment for multiple potential confounders, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Longer Surgery, Night Duty Tied to Stress Among Surgeons

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Surgeons face stress associated with longer surgeries and decreased arousal following night shifts, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Energy Drinks Linked to Alcohol Problems in College Students

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Frequent consumption of energy drinks is associated with a higher risk of alcohol dependence in college students, according to research published online Nov. 12 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Poor Handwriting in Autism Persists Into Adolescence

TUESDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Poor handwriting with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) persists from childhood into adolescence, but the main predictor for poor handwriting shifts from motor skills to perceptual reasoning ability in the older group, according to a study published the Nov. 16 issue of Neurology.

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Vyvanse Approved for Adolescent ADHD

MONDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) capsules have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among adolescents aged 13 to 17, maker Shire Pharmaceuticals said Monday.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Problematic Teen Gamers Few; Adverse Effects Serious

MONDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- While playing video games in moderation does not adversely affect health for most adolescents, problematic gamers are more likely to smoke, use drugs, fight, and feel depressed, according to a study published online Nov. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Patients Treated for Severe Acne Have Higher Suicide Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals treated with isotretinoin for severe acne are at an increased risk of attempted suicide up to six months after the end of treatment, though there is already an increased risk in acne patients before treatment, so an additional risk due to treatment cannot be established, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in BMJ.

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Childhood, Teenage Abuse Linked to Diabetes in Adulthood

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate to severe physical and sexual abuse in childhood and adolescence appears to increase the risk for type 2 diabetes in adult women, partly because of the higher body mass index in women who were abused as children, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Physician-Industry Financial Ties Decreased Since 2004

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer physicians received drug samples, food and beverages, reimbursement, or payment for professional services in 2009 than in 2004, but a large majority of physicians still report financial relationships with industry, according to research published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Prevalence Up

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of children aged 4 to 17 with a parent-reported attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis increased more than 20 percent between 2003 and 2007, with particularly notable increases among older teenagers and Hispanic children, according to a report published in the Nov. 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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New Cognitive Assessment Tool Appears Effective

THURSDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A new cognitive assessment tool, the Sweet 16, appears to be as effective as or superior to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), according to a study published online Nov. 8 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Parent's Deployment Linked to Child's Mental Health Visits

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children of military personnel appear to have an increase in outpatient visits for mental and behavioral health issues while a parent is deployed, according to research published online Nov. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Rural Teens More Likely to Abuse Prescription Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents living in rural areas are significantly more likely to abuse prescription drugs than their counterparts in urban areas, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Teens Recover From Depression With Short-Term Treatment

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who respond fully to short-term treatment for major depression are more likely than partial or non-responders to recover within two years, and full or partial responders are less likely to suffer a recurrence, though recurrence occurs in nearly half of recovered adolescents -- particularly females, according to research published online Nov. 1 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Childhood Sexual Abuse May Raise Risk for Psychosis

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood sexual abuse involving penetration appears to increase the risk of developing psychotic disorders later in life, according to research published in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Marital Distress May Predict RA Pain, Disability

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Marriage may have a role in reducing pain and disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but only if the marriage is well-adjusted or non-distressed, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Hours, Nights on Call Linked to Burnout in Surgeons

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Among surgeons, longer hours and more nights on call are associated with burnout, depression, career satisfaction, and conflicts at work and home, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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PHQ-9 Effectively Screens Adolescents for Depression

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Item (PHQ-9) appears to be an effective method for screening adolescents for depression, according to research published online Nov. 1 in Pediatrics.

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Previous: November 2010 Briefing - Pediatrics Next: November 2010 Briefing - Pulmonology

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