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Category: Pulmonology | Monthly Briefing

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November 2010 Briefing - Pulmonology

Last Updated: December 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for November 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

1 Percent of Deaths Worldwide Due to Secondhand Smoke

MONDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 1 percent of the deaths that occur in the world annually are due to passive smoking, and many of these deaths are in children, according to research published online Nov. 26 in The Lancet.

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Reallocation of Care Would Increase PCPs' Work Weeks

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Specialists spend a substantial amount of time providing routine chronic disease follow-up care, and reallocating half of this care to primary care physicians (PCPs) would add a few work weeks for each PCP, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Medical Care.

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Evidence of Autoimmune Process in Evolution of COPD

MONDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of two types of circulating autoantibodies in one-fourth to one-third of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients suggests that autoimmunity may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease, according to research published online Nov. 19 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Secondhand Smoke Tied to Hearing Loss Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to the known increased risk of hearing loss associated with smoking, it appears that exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) may pose a similar risk, according to research published online Nov. 15 in Tobacco Control.

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U.S. Health Insurance Compared to 10 Other Nations

FRIDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adults in the United States spend more time and money on health insurance than those in many other developed nations, and ultimately deal with more coverage-related disputes and denials, according to research published online Nov. 18 in Health Affairs.

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Fraud in Scientific Literature Appears Intentional

THURSDAY, Nov. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Scientific papers retracted after publication due to fraudulent data represent a calculated, deliberate effort to deceive, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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VX-770 Treatment Could Hold Promise in Cystic Fibrosis

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Among adults with cystic fibrosis, VX-770 -- a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator -- may be linked to improvements in CFTR and lung function, according to research published in the Nov. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Gray Matter Deficits Found in Sleep Apnea Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive impairment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) appears to be linked to a decrease of gray-matter volume in specific regions of the brain; however, these may be partially or fully reversed with early detection and treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Physician-Industry Financial Ties Decreased Since 2004

FRIDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer physicians received drug samples, food and beverages, reimbursement, or payment for professional services in 2009 than in 2004, but a large majority of physicians still report financial relationships with industry, according to research published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Federal Law Will Not Help All Smokers Wishing to Quit

TUESDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- With the passage of the federal health care overall legislation, millions of Americans will get help to quit smoking, but it may take a state-by-state effort to reach everyone who needs treatment, according to an American Lung Association (ALA) report, "Helping Smokers Quit: State Cessation Coverage 2010."

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Physician Alert Decreases D-Dimer Testing in Elderly

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- An automatic electronic message sent to physicians immediately after they order a possibly inappropriate D-dimer blood test for elderly patients decreases the use of that test, according to research published online Nov. 4 in the American Journal of Managed Care.

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CT Screening May Reduce Lung Cancer Death Rate

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Annual lung cancer screening using computed tomography (CT) rather than conventional X-ray imaging could cut lung cancer mortality in older current or former heavy smokers by 20 percent, according to the results of the National Lung Screening Trial published online Nov. 2 in Radiology.

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U.S. Smoking Prevalence Varies Widely by State and Territory

FRIDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported cigarette smoking prevalence in U.S. states and territories ranges from 6.4 percent in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 25.6 percent in Kentucky and West Virginia, while the prevalence of smokeless tobacco use ranges from 0.8 percent in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 9.1 percent in Wyoming, according to a report published Nov. 5 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Radiotherapy Method Improves Survival in Elderly With Cancer

THURSDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in elderly patients is associated with a significant improvement in survival and a drop in the proportion of untreated patients, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Many Children Hospitalized With H1N1 Were in ICU or Died

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Among children hospitalized with 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) in California, more than one-fourth were placed in intensive care units (ICUs) or died, according to a study published in the November Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. According to another study in the same issue that assessed children in Israel, those who had underlying illnesses and premature infants were at higher risk of severe complications from H1N1.

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Exercise Tied to Reduced Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise five days a week may be the key to reducing fall and winter upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), according to research published online Nov. 1 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Most Surrogates Want Say in Life-Support Decisions

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Surrogate decision makers for critically ill patients are likely to want more authority for life-support decisions than technical medical choices, and low trust in physicians may have a role in this preference, according to research published online Oct. 29 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Teflaro Sanctioned for Bacterial Infections

MONDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The injected antibiotic Teflaro (ceftaroline fosamil) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat bacterial infections including community acquired bacterial pneumonia and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the agency said in a news release.

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