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Category: Nursing | Monthly Briefing

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December 2010 Briefing - Nursing

Last Updated: January 03, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for December 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Underage Drinking Emergency Room Visits Rise Over Holiday

FRIDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital emergency department visits for underage drinking increased 263 percent on New Year's Day in 2009 as compared with emergency department visits on an average day during that year, according to a new Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) report published Dec. 30.

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Alcohol Consumption Tied to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

FRIDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol consumption among caregivers of infants appears to be associated with a higher risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDs), which surges on New Year's Day and increases on weekends, according to research published online Nov. 9 in Addiction.

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Drug Insurance Coverage Not a Factor in Diabetes Control

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patient demographics, cardiometabolic health, ethnicity, and ongoing drug therapy contribute more to the care gap between patients with type 2 diabetes than access to private drug insurance coverage, according to a study published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Surgical Team Training Can Improve Communication

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Team training interventions in the operating room (OR) may enhance communication among team members and result in improvements in outcomes such as complication rates, according to a report published in the December issue of the AORN Journal.

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Gestational Diabetes Testing Guidelines Updated

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In an effort to increase the identification of women with gestational diabetes and reduce health risks to mother and fetus, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has adopted new guidelines for testing pregnant women for gestational diabetes; these guidelines have been published in a special supplement to the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Pediatric Acute Sinusitis Visit Rates Unchanged

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Office and emergency department visits for acute sinusitis among children appear to have remained stable since the introduction of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, but amoxicillin use has increased substantially in accordance with American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions Vary Regionally

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- While the overall rate of admissions for substance abuse treatment in the United States remained stable between 1998 and 2008, there were substantial variations between regions, according to a new Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) report published Dec. 23.

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Collaborative Intervention May Trump Usual Care

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Collaborative, coordinated management, in which a supervised nurse works in tandem with a patient's primary care physician to provide guideline-based care, appears to result in better disease and depression control and management in patients than usual care, according to research published in the Dec. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Energy Drinks at Lower Doses May Help Reaction Times

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- An energy drink may improve individuals' reaction times, but improvements may dwindle with increasing doses, and acute caffeine consumption among adolescents has many effects that may be influenced by gender, according to two studies published in the December issue of Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.

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Alternative Medicine Tied to Adverse Events in Children

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among children is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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No Improvement Seen in Very Premature Infants

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although postnatal steroid exposure has fallen in recent years for babies born before 25 weeks' gestation, survival rates and adverse neurosensory and cognitive outcomes have changed little, according to research published online Dec. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Prepregnancy Overweight May Not Lead to Behavior Issues

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Being overweight prior to pregnancy may not increase the offspring's risk of behavioral problems or cognitive issues, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Weight Gain Accelerated With Cow Milk Formula

TUESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infants fed cow milk formula (CMF) seem to experience accelerated weight gain compared with infants fed protein hydrolysate formula (PHF), which seems to result in earlier satiety and leads to normative weight gain, according to research published online Dec. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Well-Balanced Diet Linked to Improved Survival in Elderly

TUESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A diet consisting of a high intake of low-fat dairy products, fruit, whole grains, poultry, fish, and vegetables appears to be associated with improved survival and quality of life among older adults, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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More Recreational Noise Tied to Hearing Loss in Girls

MONDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Increased exposure to recreational noise and lack of hearing-protection use may have led to an increase in noise-induced threshold shifts (NITSs), especially among female youths, in the last two decades, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in Pediatrics.

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FullPIERS Model Predicts Preeclampsia Adverse Events

MONDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A new model, called the fullPIERS model, may help identify women at risk for adverse maternal outcomes associated with preeclampsia up to seven days prior to complication onset, according to a study published online Dec. 25 in The Lancet.

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Primary Care Interventions Can Reduce Falls in Elderly

FRIDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A review and analysis of the literature suggests primary care-based interventions can reduce the number of falls suffered by the elderly; the research has been published in the Dec. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Transfer Time Above Two Hours Not Tied to Adverse Effects

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Provider-determined transfer time that exceeds a mandated maximum of two hours may not result in poorer outcomes in trauma systems, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Placebos Without Deception Still Work in IBS

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The placebo effect appears to work in some irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients even when they know their treatment contains nothing more than an inert substance, according to research published online Dec. 22 in PLoS ONE.

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Rotavirus Vaccine Linked to Consistent Effect in Children

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The drop in pediatric hospitalizations linked to diarrhea and rotavirus that was seen in the 2007 to 2008 season, compared to prevaccine seasons, was sustained but smaller in the 2008 to 2009 season, according to research published online Dec. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Caffeine Citrate Cost-Effective for Infant Apnea

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Use of caffeine citrate, at a cost of $0.21 (Canadian) per mg is both less expensive and more effective than placebo to treat apnea in premature infants, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Web-Based Shared Medical Records Useful for Sick Patients

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Web-based shared medical records (SMR) may provide an effective way for physicians to conduct non-visit-based health care, specifically for older individuals with diabetes, according to a report published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Prenatal Micronutrients Tied to Increased Functioning

TUESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In areas where the community diet may be lacking in iron, prenatal supplementation with iron and folic acid is associated with increased intellectual and motor functioning in offspring, according to research published in the Dec. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Birth Rates in 2009 at Record Lows

TUESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The birth rate among women in their twenties and thirties, preterm birth rate, percentage of births to teenagers, general fertility rate, and total number of births declined in 2009, with the birth rate among women in their forties and the cesarean delivery rate increasing, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Breast-Feeding Duration Tied to Educational Outcomes

MONDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who are predominantly breast-fed for six months or longer have better educational outcomes in middle childhood, though it appears these effects are evident in boys only, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Birth Rates Fall, As Do Death Rates in Children

MONDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to the previous year, 2008 found birth rates falling in teens and women, preterm birth rates and infant mortality rates decreasing, and death rates for children and teenagers also falling, according to a summary of vital statistics published online Dec. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Adherence to Schedule for HPV Vaccination Series Low

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to recommended schedules for human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine is relatively low, and even lower among blacks, raising concerns about disease disparity, according to research published online Dec. 13 in Pediatrics.

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Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences High

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A history of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) is commonly reported by adults, with more than half reporting at least one ACE, according to a report published in the Dec. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Many Children Consuming Sizable Amount of Caffeine

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Many children may be consuming more caffeine than previously reported, with older children consuming enough to cause physiological effects in adults, according to research published online Dec. 17 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Early Cell Phone Exposure Linked to Behavioral Problems

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Early (i.e., prenatal and postnatal) cell phone exposure may set children up for subsequent behavioral problems, according to research published online Dec. 7 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Report Addresses Vaccination Disparities in Older Adults

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Older African-Americans and Hispanics are much less likely than older whites to get vaccinated against influenza and pneumonia, according to a report by the American Lung Association, "Missed Opportunities: Influenza and Pneumonia Vaccination in Older Adults."

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2009 H1N1 Vaccine Effective and Safe in Beijing

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The PANFLU.1 vaccine, a monovalent split-virion vaccine of 15 µg of hemagglutinin antigen without adjuvant, appears to be safe and effective against H1N1 virus infection in school-age children in Beijing, according to a study published in the Dec. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Different Opioids Linked to Different Risks of Events

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The risks of adverse events among older adults using opioid analgesics for nonmalignant pain varies by agent, according to research published in the Dec. 13/27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Maternal Depression Tied to Offspring Stress

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An elevated level of depressive symptoms among women during pregnancy appears to be associated with higher levels of stress hormones among offspring at birth, as well as other neurological and behavioral differences in offspring, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in Infant Behavior and Development.

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Palm Device Monitors Recovery After Knee Replacement

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Use of Palm electronic technology by patients to record pain, mobility, and functionality improvement after knee replacement surgery provides clinicians with a real-time method to monitor patient recovery, according to a study published in a supplement to the Dec. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Benzonatate Tied to Adverse Events in Young Children

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and consumers that ingestion of the cough suppressant benzonatate (Tessalon) in children younger than 10 years of age may result in serious adverse events or death.

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Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems' Safety Questioned

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarettes, known as electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), are poorly designed and labeled, leading to safety concerns which might merit removal from the market, according to research published online Dec. 7 in Tobacco Control.

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Incidence of Neonatal Herpes Varies by Region, Insurance

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal herpes simplex virus (nHSV) is relatively rare, but more common among Midwestern newborns and those covered by public health insurance, according to research published online Dec. 13 in Pediatrics.

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Intervention Addresses Opioid Delivery in Pediatric Fractures

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A quality- and process-improvement effort can lead to improved timeliness of pain management in children with clinically apparent extremity fractures who present to the emergency department, according to research published online Dec. 13 in Pediatrics.

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Rates of Drunk, Drugged Driving in U.S. Decline

FRIDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In the last year, 13.2 percent of those age 16 or older drove while under the influence of alcohol, and 4.3 percent drove while under the influence of illicit drugs, according to a recently released Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) report, the "National Survey on Drug Use and Health: State Estimates of Drunk and Drugged Driving."

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U.S. Falling Short on Women's Health Goals

FRIDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In terms of women's health, the United States hasn't met a number of its goals, many of which are found on the Healthy People 2010 list, according to a new report from the National Women's Law Center and the Oregon Health & Science University.

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Death Rate in U.S. Down, but So Is Life Expectancy, Slightly

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Life expectancy has declined slightly in the United States, stroke is no longer the third leading cause of death, and heart disease and cancer still account for nearly half of U.S. deaths; these and other statistics can be found in a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, entitled "Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2008."

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Brief, Slight Exposure to Smoke Can Still Cause Damage

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Even very brief exposure to tobacco smoke may cause immediate damage that can have serious long-term consequences, according to a recently released Surgeon General's report, "How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease."

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Counseling May Lead to Some Improvement in Patient Health

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral counseling to improve diet or increase physical activity, provided at medium to high intensity, can lead to small improvements in patients' blood pressure, weight, and cholesterol, according to research published in the Dec. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Youths With Diabetes Smoke Cigarettes

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- High proportions of youths with types 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus use tobacco, which adds to their already elevated risk for developing cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Dec. 6 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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In Pregnancy, Buprenorphine Effective for Opioid Dependency

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Buprenorphine is an acceptable alternative to methadone for the treatment of opioid dependency during pregnancy that appears to reduce the severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), according to a study published in the Dec. 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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As Children Age, Smoking by Adults in Home More Likely

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- As children age, their family members are more likely to smoke inside the home, and older children are more likely to have recurrent ear infections if someone smokes inside the home, according to a study published online Dec. 8 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Regular Family Meetings Not Linked to Shorter ICU Stays

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In long-stay intensive care unit (ICU) patients, regular discussions between family members and staff aren't associated with a shorter length of stay, according to research published in the December issue of Chest.

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Researchers Identify Risky Infant Weight Gain Threshold

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Weight gain of at least 8.15 kg from ages 0 to 24 months may be a useful tool in screening for childhood overweight, particularly if demographic, growth pattern, and early feeding information are factored in, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Nausea, Vomiting in Pregnancy Decrease With Diclectin

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A delayed-release formulation of doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride can help lessen symptoms of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Dating Violence Among Youths Tied to Peer, Sibling Violence

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Perpetration of dating violence often overlaps with violence against peers and siblings among high school students, and it is likely to be one of many co-occurring adolescent problem behaviors, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Asthma May Hamper Young Students' Reading Ability

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Children who enter school with asthma may be more likely to have low reading achievement after 12 months, according to research published in the December issue of Chest.

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Reimbursement Issues Hinder Combination Vaccine Uptake

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Inadequate reimbursement for combination vaccines prevents more than 20 percent of pediatricians from using them, with practice size and proportion of children whose vaccinations are paid for with public funds also influencing use of combination vaccines, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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ECGs May Miss Heart Disease in Postmenopausal Women

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women may not be able to rule out coronary heart disease (CHD) based on a normal electrocardiogram (ECG), according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Gay Youths at Higher Risk for Criminal, School Sanctions

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Nonheterosexual youths are at disproportionate risk for criminal justice and school disciplinary sanctions that are not explained by increased engagement in criminal or transgressive behaviors, according to research published online Dec. 6 in Pediatrics.

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Primary Ovarian Insufficiency Tied to Depression Risk

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) appear to be at an increased lifetime risk for major depression, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Sensation Seeking, R-Movies Jointly Affect Youth Smoking

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent sensation seeking and viewing of R-rated movies both appear to increase the risk for beginning to smoke, and the relationship between them appears to be bidirectional, according to a study published online Dec. 6 in Pediatrics.

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CDC: Flu Outbreak in Georgia Signifies Start of Flu Season

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Georgia appears to be experiencing an influenza outbreak, mostly among school-aged children and caused by the influenza B strain, which can be well controlled with this season's influenza vaccine, according to a Dec. 3 press briefing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Factors Appear Useful in Predicting Gestational Diabetes

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Several easily measured demographic and clinical factors, along with two biochemical values, can be used for predicting gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in women in their first trimester of pregnancy, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes.

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Spina Bifida Is Only Major Risk to Fetus From Carbamazepine

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Spina bifida is the only major congenital malformation significantly associated with exposure to carbamazepine monotherapy, and this risk is much lower than the risk of spina bifida associated with use of valproic acid, according to research published Dec. 2 in BMJ.

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Sexual Function Same in OCP, Injectable Progestin Users

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Users of combined oral contraceptives (COC) and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) have significantly different sex hormone levels, but no differences in sexual function, according to research published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Oral Progestogens Found Inferior in Endometrial Hyperplasia

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Oral progestogens may result in a lower endometrial hyperplasia regression rate than the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), according to a literature review and analysis published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Socioeconomic Differences in Neonatal Deaths Evaluated

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Most of the "deprivation gap" in neonatal mortality in England is due to differences in death rates from prematurity or congenital anomalies, according to research published online Dec. 2 in BMJ.

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Updated Guidelines for the Prevention of Stroke Issued

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has released new guidelines for the primary prevention of strokes. The guidelines have been published online Dec. 2 in Stroke.

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Etanercept Improves Growth in Children With JIA

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Etanercept alone or in combination with methotrexate (MTX) may mitigate the potentially permanent growth retardation associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), according to research published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Annual Cytology Best Screening Strategy After CIN

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Using a model to compare various follow-up strategies after treatment for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), annual cytology screening appears to be the most cost-effective, and human papillomavirus screening adds little value, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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High Stress of Crohn's Disease Associated With Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with the burden of having Crohn's disease appears to be linked to disease exacerbations, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in Frontline Gastroenterology.

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Mental Health Conditions Prevalent in Young Women

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Depression or other serious psychological distress (SPD) is present in a substantial proportion of women of reproductive age, and a large proportion of these women go untreated, according to research published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Chronic Pesticide Exposure Tied to Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic pesticide exposure appears to be associated with an increased risk of long-term cognitive decline and possibly evolution toward dementia, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Long-Term Toxoplasmosis Outcomes Generally Good

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In children with toxoplasmosis diagnosed and treated in utero, about a quarter will develop chorioretinitis -- almost all before age 5 -- and outcomes are consistently good, according to research published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Burnout Driving Away Many Emergency Physicians

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts between work and family and poor on-the-job teamwork contribute to burnout and drive many physicians, particularly emergency physicians, to want to leave their profession, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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All-Cause Mortality Lowest With BMI of 20 to 24.9

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- All-cause mortality is lowest for adults with a body mass index (BMI) of 20.0 to 24.9 kg/m², and the risk is more than doubled for those who are extremely obese, according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Report Focuses on Eating Disorders in Children and Teens

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A new report discusses the diagnostic criteria and initial evaluation recommended in pediatric patients with disordered eating. The report has been published online Nov. 29 in Pediatrics.

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Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverage Consumption Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Substantial increases in the consumption of caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) among young adults have emerged as a public health problem, and the issue requires further investigation with well-controlled experimental trials and survey research, according to research published online Nov. 30 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Evaluation Improves Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients appears to be associated with more joint destruction and a lower probability of a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-free remission, but there is still a delay to assessment of at least 12 weeks in more than two-thirds of patients, according to a study published in the December issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Bloodstream Infections Tied to Excess Mortality in ICU

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Health-care-associated bloodstream infections and pneumonia appear to be strongly associated with increased mortality among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), according to a study published online Dec. 1 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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PAD Performance Measures Developed

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The Peripheral Artery Disease Performance Measures Writing Committee recently issued performance measures for adults with peripheral artery disease (PAD). The measures have been published online Nov. 29 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Sleeping Problems Associated With Metabolic Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- People who have trouble sleeping, particularly those with loud snoring, may be at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome, according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of SLEEP.

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CDC: HIV Testing Among Adults Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The number of adults ever tested for HIV is increasing, though nearly one-third of diagnoses still occur during late stages of disease, according to a report published in the Nov. 30 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Benefits of Probiotics, Prebiotics in Children Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The efficacy of probiotics and prebiotics to treat and prevent gastrointestinal and other ailments in children needs more research to be verified, according to a clinical report published online Nov. 29 in Pediatrics.

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Variations in U.K. Referral Patterns Examined

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Referral inequalities in the United Kingdom are more apparent for conditions that are not life threatening and when there is an absence of explicit guidelines, and for older patients, according to research published online Nov. 30 in BMJ.

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Integrated Care Cost-Effective for Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- An integrated care program that incorporates workplace ergonomics appears to be a cost-effective alternative to usual care for individuals sick listed due to chronic low back pain, according to research published online Nov. 30 in BMJ.

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