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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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December 2010 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: January 03, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for December 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Alcohol Consumption Tied to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

FRIDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol consumption among caregivers of infants appears to be associated with a higher risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDs), which surges on New Year's Day and increases on weekends, according to research published online Nov. 9 in Addiction.

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Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions Vary Regionally

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- While the overall rate of admissions for substance abuse treatment in the United States remained stable between 1998 and 2008, there were substantial variations between regions, according to a new Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) report published Dec. 23.

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Collaborative Intervention May Trump Usual Care

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Collaborative, coordinated management, in which a supervised nurse works in tandem with a patient's primary care physician to provide guideline-based care, appears to result in better disease and depression control and management in patients than usual care, according to research published in the Dec. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Social Engagement Targets May Help in Autism Intervention

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), the addition of social engagement targets to interventions may improve social and communication skills, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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Prepregnancy Overweight May Not Lead to Behavior Issues

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Being overweight prior to pregnancy may not increase the offspring's risk of behavioral problems or cognitive issues, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Depression, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Linked

TUESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A significant association between the occurrence of depression and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has been found, although it is not clear whether unidirectional or bidirectional causality exists, according to a report published in the December issue of Urology.

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Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences High

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A history of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) is commonly reported by adults, with more than half reporting at least one ACE, according to a report published in the Dec. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Decreasing Depression Tied to Longer Survival in Breast CA

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers studying women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) have found a correlation between a reduction in depressive symptoms and increased duration of survival; their findings have been published online Dec. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Long-Term Antidepressant Use May Increase Type 2 DM Risk

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- When people at risk for type 2 diabetes use antidepressants long term they may be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, although metformin may protect against this, according to a study published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Lay Counselors Linked to Mental-Health Benefit

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- An intervention featuring lay counselors appears to have provided benefits in addressing common mental disorders in patients in public primary care facilities in India, according to research published online Dec. 14 in The Lancet.

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Unhealthy Teens More Isolated, Have Weaker Social Networks

MONDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Unhealthy adolescents are more likely to have a small social circle and to be on the periphery of that circle, according to a study in the Dec. 3 issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

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For Treatment of Depression, Psychotherapy on the Decline

MONDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Two studies published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry address treatment of depression, with one study finding that use of psychotherapy has significantly decreased since 1998. The other study found that, for maintenance of remission, either pharmacotherapy or mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) should be continued.

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Familial Alcoholism, Obesity Appear Linked

FRIDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- There is strong epidemiologic support for a link between familial alcoholism and obesity risk in women, with a less robust linkage found in men, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Rates of Drunk, Drugged Driving in U.S. Decline

FRIDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In the last year, 13.2 percent of those age 16 or older drove while under the influence of alcohol, and 4.3 percent drove while under the influence of illicit drugs, according to a recently released Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) report, the "National Survey on Drug Use and Health: State Estimates of Drunk and Drugged Driving."

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Depression Tied to Decreased Gestational Age, Birth Weight

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with depressive symptoms may give birth earlier and to lower-birth-weight offspring than those without depressive symptoms, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Longer Anxiety Therapy Reduces Relapse Rate

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended release (XR) for 12 months have substantially lower relapse rates when they stop the medication than patients who stop the medication after six months, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Suicide Risk Remains High Decade After First Psychosis

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Though suicide risk after a first psychotic episode is highest soon after presentation, it remains substantially elevated even a decade later, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Benefit Seen From Smoking Cessation in PTSD Treatment

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Incorporating smoking cessation treatment into mental health care may improve abstinence rates for people with military-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to referral to specialized cessation treatment, according to research published in the Dec. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dating Violence Among Youths Tied to Peer, Sibling Violence

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Perpetration of dating violence often overlaps with violence against peers and siblings among high school students, and it is likely to be one of many co-occurring adolescent problem behaviors, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Gay Youths at Higher Risk for Criminal, School Sanctions

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Nonheterosexual youths are at disproportionate risk for criminal justice and school disciplinary sanctions that are not explained by increased engagement in criminal or transgressive behaviors, according to research published online Dec. 6 in Pediatrics.

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Primary Ovarian Insufficiency Tied to Depression Risk

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) appear to be at an increased lifetime risk for major depression, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Sensation Seeking, R-Movies Jointly Affect Youth Smoking

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent sensation seeking and viewing of R-rated movies both appear to increase the risk for beginning to smoke, and the relationship between them appears to be bidirectional, according to a study published online Dec. 6 in Pediatrics.

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About 40 Suicide Events Yearly Reported in National Parks

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- During a recent seven-year period, an average of 41 suicide events per year were reported by 84 national parks in the United States, according to research published in the Dec. 3 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Sexual Function Same in OCP, Injectable Progestin Users

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Users of combined oral contraceptives (COC) and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) have significantly different sex hormone levels, but no differences in sexual function, according to research published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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High Stress of Crohn's Disease Associated With Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with the burden of having Crohn's disease appears to be linked to disease exacerbations, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in Frontline Gastroenterology.

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Mental Health Conditions Prevalent in Young Women

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Depression or other serious psychological distress (SPD) is present in a substantial proportion of women of reproductive age, and a large proportion of these women go untreated, according to research published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Burnout Driving Away Many Emergency Physicians

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts between work and family and poor on-the-job teamwork contribute to burnout and drive many physicians, particularly emergency physicians, to want to leave their profession, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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New Report Focuses on Eating Disorders in Children and Teens

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A new report discusses the diagnostic criteria and initial evaluation recommended in pediatric patients with disordered eating. The report has been published online Nov. 29 in Pediatrics.

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Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverage Consumption Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Substantial increases in the consumption of caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) among young adults have emerged as a public health problem, and the issue requires further investigation with well-controlled experimental trials and survey research, according to research published online Nov. 30 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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